• 5,813,095
    REGISTERED
  • 54,239
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: Motorola

googarola

Motorola is on fire, seemingly copying the ways of Sony in becoming a developer-friendly OEM. Everything seems to be perfect, but wait, Motorola? Do I have to mention that our Recognized Developers spent countless hours developing toolkits to crack your bootloader? Perhaps thanks to Google’s influence, the new Motorola has become one of the good guys in the Android OEM scene.

Earlier today, we talked a little about the Moto G, a relatively powerful phone with an unlocked bootloader aimed at dominating the mid-range arena at just $179. Motorola has gone even further. Now, requesting an unlock code for developer edition devices will no longer result in a voided warranty. Moreover, all developer devices that lost their warranties due to unlocking will have them reinstated. Way to go, Motorola!

Last but not least, Motorola also released images for said devices. All in all, the company seems to be setting a great example for how OEMs should conduct their affairs. There are rumors that Motorola will produce the next Nexus phone, and actions like these only leave us more hopeful. Good move, Moto!

You can learn more on the Official Motorola Blog. Those looking to download images for their developer edition devices can do so here.

[via Android Central]

Jordan0920

Apparently, unlocking the Sony Xperia Z1 Bootloader breaks the camera. That and much more is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is an article about Framaroot bringing One-Click Root to various devices and news about root and write protection bypass for the Moto X and the Droid Ultra.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer Kevin released a video talking about understanding Xposed Framework, Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler did an XDA Unboxing of the new Nexus 7 (2013), and TV Producer TK gave us an Android App Review of ViPER4Android. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

Advertisment
Root

As an almost exclusively Nexus device user, I have come to appreciate (and to some degree, expect) a friendly attitude towards aftermarket development and hacking from my device manufacturers. However, despite a certain OEM’s somewhat recent buyout, this isn’t always the case.

Thankfully, XDA Senior Member rootdefyxt320 has created a relatively quick guide that helps root quite a few Motorola devices—specifically those that use SBF firmware in CG2.smg format. The guide walks users through the process, starting with downloading and unpacking the SBF, to building your own CWM image, to using Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire’s SuperSU to achieve root access.

Thus far, this method has been tested on various Motorola devices, including the developer’s own Motorola Defy Mini XT320, as well as the Fire XT311, XT316, XT530, XT531, and Motoluxe XT615. However, it should work on most (if not all) devices that use SBF firmware packaged in CG2.smg format.

To give this a shot on your own Moto, head over to the original thread. If you try this on a device that hasn’t yet been tested, be sure to let rootdefyxt320 know how it goes! As always, though, proceed with caution when applying any modification—especially if it hasn’t yet been tested on your own device.

Update: It appears as if this root method only works on Qualcomm-based devices running Gingerbread, and it is not universal, as was originally thought. As stated by XDA Recognized Developer mattlgroff:

This is not for all Moto Qualcomms, either. It has been patched for a very long time and is the opposite of far reaching as the OP suggests.

msm8960-bootloader-unlocking

Dan Rosenberg (a.k.a. XDA Recognized Developer djrbliss) gets the credit for finding exploits on a lot of devices, and now you can add to it the line of Motorola units that use the Qualcomm MSM8960 chipset. There are currently three models included in this category, the Atrix HD, Razr HD, and Razr M. They’re based on the processor marketed as the Qualcomm Snapdragon, and they’re hiding some interesting tricks that may eventually keep users from loading their own ROMs. Dan’s investigation did lead to an exploit, but I find some of the pseudocode he authored based on the disassembly an interesting look at what the future might bring from Motorola.

READ ON »

Motorola

Not too long ago, we brought you news of a campaign aiming at having HTC release ICS for the Desire HD. It’s been a long time coming, but there is now a similar effort underway for Motorola. Motorola has often locked down various devices. They made an attempt at peace with a bootloader unlocker tool similar to HTCDev. Unfortunately, that soured quickly when only a few devices were available to unlock. Thankfully the new RAZR i was included in the list of supported devices.

The tension has hit the boiling point and thus, SupportMyMoto was born. Started by XDA Recognized Contributor Lokifish Marz, SupportMyMoto hopes to accomplish its goals through an organized effort including negative reports to the Better Business Bureau, complaints to the FTC, getting in touch with The Consumerist, signings petitions, and so on. The efforts have already taken off, with support from various blogs, as well as developers and contributors.

If you’d like to show your support, sign the petitions, or otherwise get in on the action, you can check out the original thread for more details.

Azrienoch

It’s easy to yell at Motorola. They make promises; they break promises. We tell them they’ve hurt us; they apologize, and promise to be better. But there you are again, sitting alone at the candle-lit restaurant in your nice clothes, by yourself, waiting for Motorola, who said they would be there an hour ago.

XDA Developer TV Producer Azrienoch talks about the relationship between Motorola and consumer enthusiasts. Azrienoch talks about Motorola’s past and gives us recommendations. What should developers and enthusiasts like you do with your Motorola devices? What has the greatest impact? To find out Azrienoch’s answers to these questions, check out this video.

READ ON »

Jordan

This has been another great week at the XDA Portal. XDA Developer TV Producer Jordan returns to cover all the news you need to know to keep you updated. Jordan talks about the highlights from the Nokia and Windows Phone Event and Motorola Event. Jordan mentions the other great videos released this week from other XDA Developer TV Producers. Lance released his second episode of how to build a Windows Phone App and TK released his latest app review for Around Sound.

In Jelly Bean news, Jordan mentions the AOKP nightlies for the Nexus 7. And in CyanogenMod news, Jordan mentions Xperia Acro S device getting CyangenMod 10 and 9. Also, mentioned is the Epic 4G getting CyanogenMod 10 nightlies. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

google-apple

Legend has it that Admiral Yamamoto made the following statement shortly after Japan’s 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor: “I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.” While the validity of the statement has never been verified, the principle remains that you should be careful that the enemy you try to tease and poke is not a lion ready to devour you. I have seen a lion first-hand in the wild, and their tails will swat at the flies with nary a concern in the world, but piss them off enough and they will go for blood.

In the last year and a half, Apple has filed over 20 lawsuits against smartphone manufacturers Samsung and HTC for the ways in which they have implemented their hardware designs and Android OS implementations. During that time Google has been largely silent, with the only thing closely resembling a corporate stance being a backhanded statement Google’s Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt made at a conference in Tokyo last year. When asked about whether Google would provide financial support to HTC should they lose a patent case with Apple,  Schmidt said: “We will make sure they don’t lose, then.” That however has been the last statement made by Google about the whole mess. Until now.

When Google announced their deal to buy Motorola Mobility in August of 2011, speculation arose as to their motivation to do so, with the blogosphere exploding with word that Google’s true motivation was to gain control of over 17,000 patents that Motorola controlled. Google CEO Larry Page stated in a shareholder conference call about the acquisition:

“The combination of the two companies is going to create tremendous shareholder value, drive great user experiences and accelerate innovation. Motorola also has a strong patent portfolio, which will help protect Android from anticompetitive threats from Microsoft, Apple and other companies.”

With the finalized acquisition of Motorola by Google in May, it seemed like it was only a matter of time before Google would stop letting its hardware partners be attacked by Apple and would take a stand. On Friday Google did just that, filing a patent-infringement lawsuit against Apple for the following seven patents:  5,883,5805,922,0476,425,0026,983,3706,493,673,7,007,064 and 7,383,983. The products they are seeking an import ban on are the Apple’s iPod Touch, the iPhone 3GS, 4 and 4S, the iPad 2 and the “new” iPad, as well as the Mac Pro, iMac, Mac mini, MacBook Pro and MacBook Air and all other Apple devices “which utilize wireless communication technologies to manage various messages and content.” Motorola also argues Apple was fully aware of the patents in question.

The obvious worst-case scenario for Apple would be that all of their  products would be banned in the U.S. until they resolve the issue. I don’t believe anyone sees the worst-case scenario happening, but it would not be surprising to see some sort of preliminary injunction until the International Trade Commission (ITC) makes a ruling which is scheduled for August 24.

What is obviously interesting in this case, is that Apple would seem to be caught between the proverbial rock and a hard place. Concerning the filing, Motorola states:

“We would like to settle these patent matters, but Apple’s unwillingness to work out a license leaves us little choice but to defend ourselves and our engineers’ innovations.”

It is common practice for a manufacturer to negotiate a license with a patent holder so that they can use the invention or innovation in their products, but Apple seems unwilling to do that with anyone. Samsung also stated almost the same thing in a filing in their current court battle with Apple, that they offered in 2011 a “fair and reasonable” royalty rate for using their standards-essential mobile technology that “is consistent with the royalty rates other companies charge.” The filing stated that Apple never made a counter-offer, but “Instead, it simply rejected Samsung’s opening offer, refused to negotiate further and to this day has not paid Samsung a dime for Apple’s use of Samsung’s standards-essential technology.” Apple replied that “Samsung’s royalty demands are multiple times more than Apple has paid any other patentees for licenses to their declared-essential patent portfolios.” That all sounds well and good, but the percentage Samsung was asking for was 2.4% of the entire selling price of Apple’s mobile products that utilized Samsung’s technology, amounting to roughly $16 per iPhone (and roughly $350 million dollars according to court records). Apple on the other hand tried to license to Samsung back in 2010 patents that it felt were being infringed upon, with a royalty fee of $30 per smartphone and $40 per tablet.

Now on the surface it sounds like both are seeking to be reasonable and offer licenses, but let’s look at this from a different perspective. Apple calls Samsung unfair for requesting royalties on industry standard-essential patents and cites their demands as being more than Apple has paid anyone else, but they were the ones who first tried to license to Samsung non-essential design patents which would be subject to perception for a fee which would be more than double what Samsung offered. Who’s really being unfair and unreasonable here?

So now we come back to the Motorola/Google vs. Apple case. With a precedent being shown that Apple is more than willing to try and license their patents and accept royalties, but unwilling to return the favor, I wonder how this case will play out. Google already has a very adept legal team, able to defend itself against baseless attacks (ala Oracle vs. Google), and Apple has been moderately successful around the world but has lost some very recent cases (ala Apple vs. HTC in the UK). Personally I do not feel that Apple will allow themselves to face seeing their main money-makers be banned in the U.S., but I also don’t see them stopping their baseless attacks on innovation around the world. I hope I am wrong, but I do see them turning around and unleashing on Google directly instead of attacking the partners like they have done, which will stifle innovation more than it already has. Seeing as that has been Apple’s modus operandi the last year and a half, it may not be far off from reality.

Sources:

[Image courtesy of Rule7Media]

Jordan Point

Jordan is back today to talk more about Jelly Bean news from the XDA Portal. Jordan covers CyanogenMod 10 for the Kindle Fire and Original Galaxy Tab. The HTC HD2 also gets an unofficial CM10 alpha release. Jordan talks about universal root for Ice Cream Sandwich phones.

In Jelly Bean news, Jordan mentions the Jelly Bean OTA for the Nexus S. Also mentioned are Jelly Bean ports for the Galaxy S II i9100, HTC Evo 4G, Nexus One, MyTouch 4G Slide, Desire HD and the Motorola Defy. Jordan wraps up the video with a mention of the Linux on Android Project. This is a video you cannot miss!

 

READ ON »

Jordan Rant

Join us as our friend Jordan returns for another episode of This Week in Development. Jordan begins by covering all the tutorials available on XDA, from Beginning Android ROM Development to porting LewaOS and JoyOS to your phone.

Jordan then talks about the AT&T HTC One X bootloader unlock, S Voice fix, and Samsung Note international source code release. Jordan covers XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire‘s Windows Mobile 6 market hack and XDA Portal Administrator Will Verduzco’s how to root the how to root the Meizu MX video. Finally, Jordan strongly discusses his views on all the copyright and patent wars in the mobile world. Check it out!

READ ON »

Capture

In today’s Quick Take of This Week in Development, Jordan covers all the noteworthy articles from the XDA Portal. As Jordan discusses, the most important articles were about the Samsung Galaxy S III. This weekend the Galaxy S III was rooted, official stock firmware was leaked, Samsung S Voice was ripped, and the first custom ROM was released. In related news, the older Samsung Galaxy S II and Note have a serious bug that could brick your device.

Jordan then talks about CM9 Alpha arriving for the Droid X2. Finally, Jordan mentions our new Pro Tip series on XDA TV. All said, this is another video you don’t want to miss!

READ ON »

Jordan 6

This week on the XDA Portal, we saw many important stories. To give a run down of these stories, XDA TV Producer Jordan returns with another episode of This Week in Development.

Jordan mentions the Apple versus HTC patent wars and court battles. In more big, rich companies versus other rich companies news, Jordan updates us on the Oracle versus Google trial. In more Google news, the limit on device deauthorization on Google Music is discussed. The lamentable actions by Motorola and the locking down of their devices is mentioned. Finally, Jordan urges you to go check out  XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler’s Galaxy Nexus tear down and unboxing.
READ ON »

Motorola

Not long ago, we brought you a nearly universal Gingerbread root method for Samsung phones. It was really cool, as more than two dozen Samsung devices could be rooted and unrooted two simple files. Since rooting is at the core of device development , new root methods—especially universal ones—are always exciting news.

XDA Forum Member rodrigojfuentes has posted a method that should root all Motorola phones currently running Gingerbread. The method requires users to be running Linux, so Windows and Mac users need to load a Linux virtual machine to proceed.

From there, it’s a few commands to obtain and alter the the files, followed by a simple flash. Nothing too difficult, but be sure to read the instructions thoroughly in order to make sure you understand what’s going on.

Full instructions can be found in the original thread.

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa

  • Nexus 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Galaxy Note 3 (T-Mobile) buy | sell
  • HTC One M7 (Verizon) buy | sell
  • Galaxy S 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Nexus 7 2013 buy | sell
  • Swappa is the official marketplace of XDA