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Posts Tagged: newuser

2mcypa8

OK, it can happen to the best of us. No, I’m not talking about that. I’m talking about loosing root permissions. Sometimes it’s because of an OTA, other times it comes from a borked flash, and other times yet, it’s not even a lack of root access, but rather the lack of BusyBox.

Whatever the cause, it is annoying not having a properly functioning (and updated) version of the the superuser binary, a controller app, and BusyBox. Luckily for new users who run into issues, XDA Senior Member CrotaNexus created Simple Root Checker. The app does as its name implies and checks for proper installation of the aforementioned items, and also lists their versions if present—and it does this with a handy and legible UI. Please note, however, that this does not actually root your device. New users should instead look for guides to accomplish this task in their respective XDA Forum sections.

Obviously, this application is geared towards new users who would otherwise have a hard time figuring out where things went wrong when something does go wrong . That said, it can even be a little bit of a time saver for those who know what they’re doing.

Head over to the application thread to get started.

adb_pull

Most of us here are already quite familiar with the ADB (Android Debug Bridge). Heck, I’d even wager that many of us use it on quite a regular basis—adb pushing and pulling files, adb rebooting, running shell commands, and so on. Most new users, however, have not had such exposure. And let’s face it: For youngsters born after the emergence and popularization of the GUI, command line interfaces can be rather intimidating. So if you’re a seasoned veteran who knows ADB like the back of your hand, this article is not for you. But if you’re a new user looking to learn a little more about this great tool, read on!

The Android Debug Bridge, which comes as part of the Android SDK, allows for communication between your desktop computer and target device. So what can you do with ADB? Quite a bit. As alluded to earlier, you can push files to the device from the client PC, pull device from the device to the client PC, you can reboot (to Android, bootloader, or recovery), record a logcat, obtain a bug report, execute many standard Linux commands, and much, much more.

The biggest problem for new users becomes knowing what commands can be executed and remembering the proper syntax. Luckily, these commands and their syntax are all pretty understandable. For example, take a look at the following commands in proper syntax:

  • adb start-server : This command starts the adb daemon on your desktop computer and allows your computer to interact with your device. Note that this command isn’t essential, as executing any other ADB command will automatically start the daemon.
  • adb kill-server : As you would expect, this kills the adb daemon.
  • adb logcat : This generates a logcat, which is quite useful when figuring out where things are going wrong. You can redirect the output into a text file by using “>”. For example, you can type “adb logcat > logcat.txt” to record your logcat as logcat.txt.
  • adb bugreport : Generates a simple bug report. Just like logcat, you can redirect this into a text file using “>”
  • adb install <local apk name> : Installs an APK from your desktop computer directly to your device.
  • adb pull <source path and filename> <destination path and filename> : Pulls the specified file and deposits it into the specified folder with the specified name.
  • adb push <source path and filename> <destination path and filename> : Functions like adb pull, but in reverse.

The above, however, is not nearly comprehensive. These are just some of the more common commands that you’ll encounter.

For those looking to learn a few more, or those who would simply like to see a visual output of these commands in action, XDA Recognized Contributor doctor_droid has created a basic guide that covers everything a beginner needs to know in order to accomplish basic tasks through ADB.

Doctor_droid has also includes a direct link to the required ADB binaries for Windows users so that you don’t have to download the SDK for the sole purpose of getting ADB up and running. While the installation procedures are strictly for Windows users, the rest of the guide is equally valid for Linux and Mac users.

If you’re a new user looking to learn a little more about ADB, or even if you’re a seasoned vet looking to make sure you know all of the common commands, head over to the guide thread to learn more.

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wakelocks

The number one issue most people have with their smartphone is battery life—unless of course, it’s the Motorola Droid Maxx or the LG G2. There are many tricks people have to help extend their battery’s life: dim the screen all the way and squinting to read the screen, turning off WiFi when they aren’t at home and forgetting to turn it back on and using all their allotted data, or some other Voodoo trick. However, there may be something impacting their battery life that they don’t know about: wakelocks.

In today’s video, XDA Developer TV Producer Kevin talks about Wakelocks. He gives a basic overview of what wakelocks are. Kevin then talks about a few apps that can help with solving this puzzle. These apps have been review by TK in the past: Wakelock Detector and Greenify. So if you want to learn more about wakelocks and how to deal with them, check out this video.

READ ON »

Screenshot_md5sum

One of the most important tools we have for flashing images directly from a PC is fastboot. Almost anyone who’s rooted an HTC or Nexus device has used it, either through command line or through an automated tool making use of fastboot.

After all, this is how we execute that fastboot oem unlock command that we all know and love on Nexus devices. However, there’s much more that you can do with fastboot. Now thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor demkantor, we have a simple and incredibly easy to understand guide that teaches you how to setup fastboot, what it can do, how you can use it, and why you would even want to use it.

After drawing parallels to ADB and giving beginners a brief overview of what it can do, the initial setup is covered with two options: either manual setup via the Android SDK or a more automated tool to obtain the requisite binaries. After this, basic fastboot commands are covered such as erasing an existing partition or flashing it with an image. Sample output text is provided so that you know what to expect when doing it for yourself for the first time.

If you’re a new user who has never used fastboot, now would be a great time to learn. Head over to the guide thread to learn more.

xposedframework

XDA and its members are known for two things: being awesome and custom ROMs. Back in the Windows Mobile days, just about every tweak had to be setup in the ROM by the chef and flashed to your device. With Android, things have become more flexible. The most flexible option is the Xposed Framework. With this, you can cherry-pick different mods you want to add to your device.

In today’s video, XDA Developer TV Producer Kevin talks about the Xposed Framework. He gives a basic overview of what Xposed does. Then, Kevin talks about a few custom modules on XDA and shows what they can provide for you. So if you want to learn more about the Xposed Framework, check this video out.

READ ON »

HowTo_Phone_updater-script-600x681

If you’ve ever flashed any aftermarket development work or theme through a custom recovery, installed an OTA update, or used the powerful AROMA file manager, you’ve used an updater-script. No big deal, right? Everyone who reads this site should already know this.

What not every beginner can do, however, is look into the updater-script and make sense of it all. We’ve featured a few tools in the past that help users create updater-scripts, but it’d also be good to know what it all means. Now you can, thanks to a new guide.

Authored by XDA Recognized Developer KINGbabasula, the guide takes an example updater-script and explains various commands. These include getprop, mount, package_extract_file, set_perm, run_program, symlink, set_perm_recursive, and several more.

If you’re a beginner who wants to learn a little more about the ubiquitous updater-script, head over to the tutorial thread and get your reading on.

2192059-nfc-touch

With a more than a decade-old history, near field communication, better known as NFC, seems to have only just recently exploded onto the market, mass distributed with almost every new device since 2012 and onward. You now see ads marketing and exhibiting the ‘magic’ of this relatively old technology, exemplified with people merely touching their phones together to share photos, videos, documents and so on. But did you know that you aren’t limited to these specific use cases?

XDA Senior Member one5‘s surely knew, as a thread was created listing a plethora of items that can be scanned with your NFC-enabled device. These include credit cards, student IDs from various universities, passports of certain countries, public transport cards and tickets, rewards and member cards, as well as many other miscellaneous items, such as books from the ‘Les Champs Libres’ in France. Please be mindful however, that in many instances involving such listed items, particular apps or passwords are required, and some may even come up as unsupported or encrypted, depending on your locality and so forth.

Further discussion can be had in the thread regarding the introduction and implementation of NFC into the infrastructure of many countries and cities, and you may just pleasantly discover that your local train station or ATM is NFC enabled, giving you the perfect reason to whip out your phone and perform some ‘magic’ in front of onlookers and passersby.

So if this has gotten your attention, be sure to check out the original thread for more information.

downloaduf

If you’re an Android user, there’s really almost no reason why you shouldn’t have some basic knowledge on how to use ADB and pull a logcat. After all, what better way is there to give back to the developers that help make our mobile devices better than by giving them the tools they need to diagnose issues effectively whenever they arise? And while most casual users have used the Dalvik Debug Monitor Service to take screenshots before the feature was officially added to the stock Android UI, there’s much more that can be done with the tool.

By now, you should be no stranger to the importance of logcat. We’ve covered the topic quite a few times in the past with various tools to help you help devs looking to troubleshoot their applications. However, even with tools at your disposal, it’s always nice to know how to do the same process manually. The same can be said about ADB knowledge in general. It’s just plain useful to have, and something we’d highly recommend around here. And the ability to do so manually is the extra icing on the cake.

In this spirit, XDA Senior Member -MR.WORLDWIDE- has created a simple and introductory- to intermediate-level guide to help you accomplish all of the tasks listed above. The guide is focused towards Windows users, and it covers topics ranging from installing the Java JDK and the Android SDK, all the way to actually connecting via ADB, pulling a logcat, and using DDMS for various monitoring-related tasks. Regarding ADB commands, sample commands are given that will teach you how to accomplish tasks such as installing and uninstalling an APK from your local computer, pushing and pulling devices to and from your device, and using adb shell to access your device via command line.

Head over to the guide thread to get started

online_guide

It’s been well established that XDA-Developers  is the destination for resources relating to technology and development. With the Forums, the Wiki, XDA-University, and XDA-Developer TV; anyone regardless of skill level can visit XDA and learn and partake in development. So it is great to see an extensive compilation of guides from the XDA forums for the newbie and the dev, in one place for your availability and convenience.

Compiled by XDA Recognized Contributor adityalahiri13, the collection of 73 guides ranges from very simple activities such as flashing ROMs and kernels all the way up to compiling from source, theming, and porting features and functions. The guides are conveniently categorized according to the category of development they focus on, such as theming, compiling, and APKs, and numerically labelled for ease of navigation.

The compilation includes excellent guides previously covered on the Portal such as XDA Recognized Contributor sandy7‘s guide on how to port Sony Small Apps to any device, building your own kernel from source by Senior Member thewadegeek, and Senior Member HJ200‘s guide on how ‘3D-fying’ your apps.

This compilation of guides is a very bookmarkable page that anyone who is keen on learning development should have as a reference in their browser. It is also a reminder of the helpfulness of the community. Of course, all credit for the guides goes towards their respective authors.

If you would like to check this out, be sure to visit the original thread.

ADB_cmd_screenshot

You will have noticed that here on the portal we tend to harp on about the Android Debug Bridge (ADB for short) quite often. There’s a good reason for that though, as not only is it one of the most useful and versatile tools available, it is incredibly easy to use once you get started. XDA Senior Member Iamareebjamal has put together a thorough explanation of how to get ADB set up and the most commonly used commands to manipulate your device and gather those crucial logcats  for developers.

There are a multitude of different things that you can achieve via ADB, from rebooting the device into various states, pushing/pulling & installing/uninstalling files, and even backing up your device. It also allows you to execute what’s known as an ADB shell and navigate the file structure using commands that Linux users will be familiar with.

Quite possibly the most useful function of ADB from a development point of view is the ability to generate a complete real time log of what is happening on the device at any given time. Step into any development thread here on XDA, and there’s a pretty good chance you’ll find someone being asked to provide a logcat. As the old saying goes, logcat or GTFO.

All of these commands and more are explained in detail over in the tutorial thread. So check it out if you’re new to ADB or just looking for a little refresher course.

basics1

In this video, XDA Developer TV Producer TK talks about the ways you can back up your applications and data on your phone. This allows you to restore this information in case of a phone crash or in case you do a full wipe when flashing a new ROM or kernel.

In this video, XDA Developer TK Producer TK talks about three applications that will make backups for you. First is ROM Manager, which along with the ClockWorkMod Recovery allows you to make a Nandroid Backup of your system. Second is the popular Titanium Backup, which will work on any system with root privileges and backs up system applications and data along with installed applications and data. The third option is My Backup. Check out this video.

READ ON »

C Programming Language

While the unofficial ethos of XDA Developers deals with the hacking and development of various handheld devices, it is also a treasure trove of information. You can find tutorials on every day things like installing ADB, brush up on your terminology, and even stuff like compiling and decompiling APK files. Whether you’re here to show off your skills or learn some skills, there’s a thread on XDA for you.

One thing devs typically run into is programming. One of the things any dev needs to learn about, be it a ROM or kernel dev or an Android app dev, are various programming languages. XDA Senior Member mhrsolanki2020 has decided to help the community out by posting a tutorial that’ll help users learn C Programming.

So far there are three chapters posted, with many more still to come. Chapter one deals mostly in the concept of C Programming and explains things like what a program is and how they work. Chapter two deals with flow charts, their symbols, what they mean, and how they work. Chapter three goes into further depth on variables and constraints in flow charts. Since any programmer knows that learning flow charts is par for the course, it’s good to get it out of the way early. Future tutorials will deal more with C Programming in terms of proper syntax and how to actually write a good application.

If you’re looking to learn a little C Programming, check out the original thread.

ewwwwwwwwwMac

Most Android developers tend to prefer Linux as their desktop OS for all of their Android-related needs. However, that does not mean it isn’t possible to work with Android in Windows and Mac computers as well. There are a plethora of guides out there to install the Android SDK on Windows and Linux, but there aren’t many out there that will teach you how to do it with a Mac.

XDA Senior Member AshtonTS is looking to change that by writing up a comprehensive guide for new Mac users on the basics. That is, downloading and installing the Android SDK so you can use ADB and Fastboot. This includes actually getting it installed, and then adding it to your path so that you can use it without switching directories.

In addition to providing step by step directions, AshtonTS has also provided screen shots for those who need to see what’s going on. Download times aside, the process shouldn’t take very long. If you’re having issues, AshtonTS is also using the thread to provide support. What is nice about such a thread is that it is a complete tutorial and with all the resources included, and it gives new Mac users a go-to thread for getting the Android SDK installed.

For more info, check out the original thread.

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