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Posts Tagged: nokia

Jordan0407

Android 4.4.2 KitKat with Sense 5.5 update is coming to the Verizon HTC One Max today! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews some of the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is the announcement that the Verizon LG G2′s KitKat update was leaked, as well as a story about how to convert your Carrier HTC One M8 to Google Play Edition! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the exciting news coming out for development starting on the Nokia X with TWRP and CWM ported to it and the announcement that CyanogenMod 11 has hit Milestone 5! Pull up a chair and check out this and other XDA Developer TV videos.

READ ON »

632826Capturedcran25

Once you start mucking around with a device’s firmware to add all your favorite tweaks and whatnot, you’ll almost undoubtedly need to restore to stock at some point in the future. Luckily, there are various device- or OEM-specific tools out there for to help people accomplish this task. Samsung devices have Odin and Heimdall, Sony devices have Flashtool, and Nokia devices have a few different options including Nokia Care Suite.

So how do you use Nokia Care Suite to download and flash your Lumia device to its stock WP8 firmware? XDA Recognized Contributor anaheiim wrote a comprehensive guide detailing the exact process. The guide starts off with how to find and download the appropriate stock ROM using Nokia Care Suite. Once you’ve downloaded the right files, the guide then shows you how to use the Care Suite’s Product Support Tool to flash the file you just downloaded. The guide has plenty of screenshots to guide you along the way, as well as a couple possible error messages and what to do when you experience them. It even mentions how to de-brand your Lumia WP8 device and remove carrier-specific software—though it must be noted that this doesn’t SIM-unlock your device.

If you wish to restore your WP8-powered Nokia Lumia device to stock and are looking for an easy-to-follow guide on how to this, head over to the guide thread to learn more.

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Jordan0303

Android 4.4.2 KitKat source code for the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S4 been released! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement that the T-Mobile LG G2′s KitKat update is available as well and Android 4.4 has been leaked for the AT&T LG Optimus G Pro! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about adding 4k and 120 FPS abilities to the Stock LG Camera. Finally, Nokia treats developers well and the Nokia X has been rooted and loaded with Google Apps, the Play Store and Google Now! Pull up a chair and check out this and other XDA Developer TV videos.

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mwc

Mobile World Congress is happening right now. Chances are your FaceGramTwitterBook Plus feeds are being spammed with all the exciting announcements—everything from Sony’s new devices to Samsung and HTC, and that’s not all! There’s a good chance you missed something or have Kelly Bundyed it. That’s when you hear too much stuff and you loose the older information as it falls right out of your brain.

There is no need to fear because XDA Developer TV Producer Extraordinaire Jordan has scoured the web, RSS feeds, Social Media feeds, YouTube, and a Taco Bell Breakfast menu to compile all the information you need to know about what has been announced at this year’s Mobile world Congress. So, pull up a chair and check out this video.

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nokiax

Ever since we first caught wind of the potential existence of an Android-powered Nokia smartphones twenty days ago, rumors have been flying around left and right. The device, which was thought to be named “Normandy,” is the embodiment of what many would consider the ideal device: the Android operating system running on Nokia’s critically acclaimed (and durable) hardware.

The rumors got off to a healthy start with some leaked screenshots and renders showcasing a Qualcomm Snapdragon-based (unknown variant) device, with what appeared to be a 4″ screen running at WVGA resolution. The rumors also pointed to a 5 MP camera and a dual SIM slot. Not too long after, we saw alleged shots of the device powered on and booted up, showcasing its unique and highly customized Android UI. Around that time, we also saw a few color options appear in another leaked render. Then a couple days later, we saw another leaked shot of the physical device, as well as new leaked screenshots of the highly customized user interface, complete with two separate user interface modes. Now thanks to leaker extraordinaire @evleaks, we have a few additional details to add to the rumor mill.

For starters, according to @evleaks, the device in question will be called the Nokia X. This replaces the “Normandy” moniker we’ve seen thus far, as well as the A110 codename we saw in the first screenshots. And according to the leak, we also have a good idea about the device’s hardware specs:

Nokia X: 2 x 1GHz Snapdragon, 4″ WVGA, 512MB / 4GB / microSD, 5MP, 1500MAh, Nokia Store + 3rd party, dual-SIM, 6 colors.

Those with a keen eye will be quick to note that these latest rumored specs match up perfectly with the previously rumored details we shared about the A110, as this leak also points to a 4″ WVGA screen, a Snapdragon processor, dual-SIM slots, multiple casing colors, and a 5 MP camera. Judging by the limited storage, RAM, and battery capacity, we can assume this device will be aimed at the budget-friendly market currently being dominated by the likes of the fantastic Moto G. And the rumored Nokia Store lends even more credence to the idea that this device (if it ever comes to exist) will be based on a forked and heavily modified version of Android, which is perhaps only “Android” at its very core.

What are your thoughts on a potential Nokia-built Android device? Now that more rumors are flying around, do you think this could actually be in the works, or do you think that all of the hardware development and leaks we’ve seen surrounding the Normandy/Nokia X/A110 were just safety measures in case the Microsoft acquisition fell through? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

[Source: @evleaks]

nokia

You may remember that  just five days ago, we shared some relatively convincing rendered images and a few screenshots of the alleged Android-powered Nokia “Normandy.” Now, there is some new fuel to add to the rumor mill fire, as two new leaked pictures have appeared, only this time, they’re not renders!

This device, which seems to be branded as the Nokia A110 if the previously leaked screenshots are to be believed, is running a highly customized version of Android 4.4.1 atop Linux Kernel 3.4.0. However, as XDA Senior Member rahil3108 was quick to point out in the article comments, there is already an Android-powered device labeled A110: the Micromax A110. And sure enough, it runs at the same 854×480 resolution as was seen in the screenshots.

Now, however, we have two alleged photographs of the elusive Nokia Normandy, including one image featuring a UI very similar to the previously leaked renders. Given that Microsoft is in the process of acquiring Nokia’s device and services business, it’s relatively unlikely that the Normandy will ever see the light of day. But with all the leaked renders, screenshots, and today’s images capturing the device in the flesh; it’s not hard to believe that the device is (or was) being actively worked on.

What are your thoughts on the Normandy? Do you think this was some kind of “Plan B” in the event of problems with the Microsoft Acquisition, or do you think this device is just some Shenzhen knockoff? Let us know in the comments below!

[Source: Twitter (1,2) | Via PocketNow]

Bdd1OWuCIAQN_Ue

Bdd1OWuCIAQN_UeFor many, an Android-powered Nokia device would be the Holy Grail of smartphones. Imagine combining the fantastic industrial design and durability of Nokia devices with the power and versatility of Android. Sounds too good to be true, right? Not so fast.

For some time now, we’ve seen leaks and heard rumors that Nokia was working on an Android-powered device. Now, pictures of this rumored device, believed to be codenamed “Normandy,” have surfaced.

So what do we know about this super secret Android-powered Nokia device? Quite a bit—if the rumors are to be believed, that is. READ ON »

recycle-cell-phone1

I am, and have always been, an early adopter of a lot of things, particularly when it comes to technology. My cell phone voyage started back in the year 2000 with a Nokia 5110. Back then, only a handful of people had phones, and seeing someone on the street with one was a somewhat rare sight. Nowadays, the same cannot be said. Cell phones have become a massive commodity—one that gets a lot of attention, and certainly one that is likely one of the most profitable industries in the world today (in the tech sector anyways).

Every Joe Schmuck and Jane Doe sport the latest Galaxy devices or one of Apple’s latest iconic iPhones (just to mention a few manufacturers). Sure, they all have a somewhat interesting appeal, and many of them are loaded with more unique functions and capabilities that (in theory) make life a lot easier. However, looking at the overall market and trying to overlay an innovation line through the timeline from the early 2000′s (when Nokia reigned supreme) ’til today, we can easily notice a few trends that are worrying and don’t necessarily correlate with what anyone would expect from “progress” or “development.”

Going back to the very beginning of my article, I mentioned owning a dinosaur of a phone, the Nokia 5110. The device was a jewel, and it did exactly what it needed to do (and far more). The device was relatively cheap to get with a 2-3 year agreement. So, the device manufacturer (again, in this particular case, Nokia) knew that in order to have a good customer base, the devices needed to last that long. After all, not everyone could spend $400-600 USD on a phone upgrade while still being locked in the middle of a contract, nor were they willing to do so either.

Nokia designed the 5100 series with a few crucial engineering concepts in mind: good battery, reliable, easy to service, and durable. I had my device for the length of my contract before I decided to upgrade (mainly due to swapping carriers). I have to admit that it must have been one of the best cell phones I have ever had the pleasure of using. Not because of the usage per se, but rather how the device gave me 0 issues in the course of 3 years of ownership. Needless to say, the thing was built to last, as the body was virtually indestructible (exaggerating a tad here, but it was a tough device). When I upgraded, I went with a Nokia 8210. They had done a good job because with their mindset, they created a device that prompted me to want to see what else they could come up a few years down the line—all that without compromising my ability to enjoy the one I currently had.  Ah, those were the days.

Fast forward to 2007 (big jump, I know). The iPhone was released and the (back then) current king of smartphones, Windows Mobile HTC devices and Blackberry, were dethroned. Because of silly mistakes, loads of bugs, and a simple yet effective marketing strategy to get people to buy more, the iPhone 1G sees a successor not much later down the line. Seeing how many other manufacturers were now jumping into the bandwagon, stable and decent cell phone manufacturers saw themselves in dire need to release more products in a shorter timespan. This was primarily done to keep up with their competitors, who were quickly gaining market share due to shorter intervals between new products. The next thing that happened (and still does to this day), new models are released every 6-9 months, each one promising to be “better” than their predecessor(s). This last statement is the cornerstone of this entire article. Why are manufacturers releasing devices that are NOT designed to be the best they have to offer? It isn’t that they develop new tech for newer versions. Rather, they make enough (in)significant changes to the existing one, such that it can be labeled the “next best thing.”Does any of this sound familiar?

I myself am an engineer, as many of you are as well (or studying to become). It honestly makes my blood boil when I consider the engineering teams behind the product development of some of these devices. No longer are devices durable. Rather, they have gone entirely to the other end of the spectrum and have become practically disposable. I simply cannot believe that a $500-1000 USD item becomes “irreparable.” Product design basics dictate that any engineered product is designed to have a certain life expectancy under normal conditions, tear, and wear, and even leave some leeway for accidents. If products need repair, they should be perfectly serviceable by the manufacturer without having to charge the consumer exorbitant amounts of money to get the product back in working order. Needless to say, whenever a phone does break this day and age, sending it in for repairs is a fruitless ordeal due to the fact that more often than not, the device will be deemed as “not repairable” due to directions coming from engineering design teams.

Make the world a better place through the application of science? That is what product engineering should be about. Squeezing every last drop of sweat over your own design and making sure that you put your very best efforts into making something that people will have for years (not months) to come is what every engineering company should strive for. Unfortunately, this was quickly replaced with “ooh, look how shiny this new toy is,” which is then followed by “oh, your old one? pfft That is so 3 months ago…. you won’t get two pennies for it on eBay, and don’t even think about repairing it.”

We as consumers have allowed these companies to throw basic engineering practices out the window so that they can squeeze more juice out of us. Now, I have no issues with companies trying to make money. Hell, that is what they do after all. But when greed takes over your most basic principles, I simply have no sympathy. I still recall our friend XDA Senior Recognized Developer AdamOutler doing an unboxing of the new Droid Razr when it came out. His words have been stuck in my head ever since. “Motorola made this device to be disposable.” Why? What was the point of making the device “disposable?” Why did such an important part of engineering a new product (ease of service) gets tossed aside like this? Would it kill you to make your device fixable? Another example: I tried to fix the digitizer of my HTC Titan a few days ago, but ended up destroying the LCD entirely. Why would there be any need to superglue both LCD and digitizer and superglue that combo to the device’s body? To keep them in place you say? There are small, low profile screws that will do the job just as well without jeopardizing the serviceability of the device or its overall design (read: they will not make it any thicker).

The entire world has been sucked into a game that the companies play on a large scale. They are trying to see just how much they can shove down our throats, all while expending the least amount of effort in doing so. These practices not only have the effects mentioned earlier, but they can also have dangerous consequences (bulging exploding battery of SGS2 devices anyone?). The core activities here on XDA-Developers actually somewhat put a damper on this, as the allure of “a new OS version exclusive to a device” is now mitigated. But unfortunately, software is just but a small part of the overall equation.

Next time you are out there shopping for a cell phone, just think about a very important thing that goes beyond specs or pretty colors. Just think about how well the product you are about to purchase was engineered. Let that be your deciding factor, and don’t simply fall in line with the rest of the masses who will jump at anything shiny like fish in heat. There are manufacturers out there that still care about trying to keep their core engineering values. To these companies, kudos. To the ones like HTC, which used to be like this (my HTC Wallaby that I bought in 2003 and that has been through hell and back still works), look at your early years and try again. Get off the path you are in right now because you will lose this race. And to the companies that simply don’t give two flying feathers about engineering, progress, and making the world a better place (looking at you Apple), I sincerely hope that your lack of engineering values comes back with a vengeance and bites you where the sun doesn’t shine.

If I have to choose between a phone that is 0.0001 mm thick but that will break upon looking at it without any way to fix it or my old 5110, I’ll take my old Nokia any day of the week. At least, that has engineering at heart.

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