POSTS TAGGED: Open Hardware

Google ADK 2012: Working with Google’s Accessory Development Kit – XDA Developer TV

adkvideo

Last year at Google I/O, Google released its ADK 2012. XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler got a hold of the device and unboxed it after last years Google I/O. He showed off all the features of the device back then. He promptly placed it on his desk and left it in clock mode.

In this video, AdamOutler decided it was time to do something with it. You will see AdamOutler deal with the display portion of the device. He will show you have to make it display messages and change the colors it displays them. Finally, he overcomes the 6 character display limitation.  Check out this video and get the source here.. . . READ ON »

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How to Build an Android App Part 3: Arduino Development – XDA TV

arduino

Last year at Google I/O, Google released the Android Accessory Development Kit. And yesterday we gave a brief primer on the options available for those looking to get started with the ADK. Arduino is the foundation which the Google ADK is based upon. In this video, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler demonstrates setup and use of an Arduino.

To start things off, AdamOutler shows us how to use an Arduino board to make a LED array. He then programs the board to flash the LEDs making an awesome flashlight-like device. Finally, AdamOutler shows us another option for an Arduino. Developers looking to get into making accessories that interface with mobile devices or just tinker with some really cool stuff . . . READ ON »

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Open-Source Hardware–The Industry Standard

Closed Source (TM)

The center of most modern development is Open-Source.

Open-Source is a huge selling point, allowing the user to potentially be on equal or greater knowledge-footing than product support.  Open-Source allows the end user to read and write the same software that comes on the device.  Open-Source also gives us the tools we need to modify our devices.

Lets take a look back at the beginnings of Open-Source, back in the 70’s.  When Richard Stallman’s (Founder of GNU) printer jammed, it gave no warning.  The printer was a networked printer, and it took an hour to print.  When a user would print, they would check back in an hour only to find out the printer was jammed to start with.

But at that point, we w

. . . READ ON »
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