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Posts Tagged: Oppo Find 5

Oppo-Find-5-1-160007

Oppo is quite a a developer friendly OEM, and the Oppo N1 is quite the confirmation of this. The previous Oppo device, the Find 5 is also very successful. Good technical specification and great support from Oppo were paramount to its success. However, Oppo didn’t avoid making some weird decisions, such as granting only 2 GB of space for user data.

Allocating 2 GB to /userdata is rather strange, as the device came with up to 32 GB of internal storage. Rather, almost all new devices ship with /userdata and /sdcard on the same parent partition to share the available space. Using ART on such limited storage space can be quite a hassle as well.

Luckily, the Oppo 5 developer scene is pretty active, and a number of developers lead by XDA Recognized Developer cyansmoker found a solution to make a data partition bigger. The whole process can be executed on Windows, Linux, and Mac because it uses ADB. To enlarge the data partition to 4 GB, you should carefully follow the instructions and be prepared to lose all data on your phone, so a backup is more than recommended. The developer was kind enough to provide an unbricking tutorial, but caution is required. Big thanks should also go to XDA Recognized Contributor anders3408 who put his device on risk of bricking and shared his experience with all users of Oppo forum.

If you own an Oppo Find 5 and want to expand your data partition, make your way to the hack thread to get started.

[Big thanks to my fellow news writer Samantha for the tip]

simple tool of5

Oppo is proving to be a developer-friendly manufacturer of Android devices. Not only was it a Senior Sponsor for the XDA Dev-Con event a couple of weeks ago, but it has also shown much love and acceptance for the open source development community on their flagship Oppo Find 5.

With this spotlight shining upon Oppo, it is with no surprise that it has attracted a great number of users, new and experienced, to the development prospects and potential it has to offer. To help both novice and end-users ease into the flow of things with the Find 5, XDA Recognized Developer benjamin.j.goodwin has developed Simple Tool. A multi-purpose tool for the PC, Simple Tool does some of the more frequently performed ADB and Fastboot actions in a simple and straightforward manner, including:

  • Rebooting the device
  • Rebooting to recovery
  • Rebooting the bootloader
  • Flashing a recovery
  • Flashing a boot image
  • Wiping the cache

A handy and brief FAQ has also been posted answering to some of the more common issues users may encounter. Benjamin.j.goodwin also has plans to update Simple tool with additional actions such as one-click rooting and support for additional devices.

If you would like to find out more, visit the original thread for more information.

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oppo5

We have talked about the Oppo Find 5 before. This relatively unknown phone manufacturer (though well known for their home entertainment equipment) has created a lot of buzz recently. To be honest, this video is going to continue that buzz. And rightfully so, as the Oppo Find 5 is easy to root and install a custom recovery.

In today’s video, XDA Developer TV Producer Kevin talks about the Oppo Find 5′s features. He then talks about how to install a custom recovery. Once you get there, you can flash a SuperSU APK from Recovery and you are rooted. Check this video out.

READ ON »

Jordan0712

The Oppo Find5 has a new firmware soon to be released, and we had a chance to preview it. That and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is an article teaching Android 101 basics and news about XDA’s new participated filter.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer Kevin released a video talking about using NFC to trigger events on your phone, later he released a video on getting Quick Settings on unrooted and older phones, and TK did an app review of CameraAce. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

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Right or wrong, first impressions often shape the way we view people, places and things. It’s in our makeup, the fabric of who we are. Sometimes we can ignore these thoughts, but more often than not they influence us. And that’s literally the first thing I thought when I was given a Release Preview to Oppo’s new Find5 Firmware, codenamed “Color” (previously known as “Project Firefly”).

For those who aren’t familiar, the Oppo Find5 is a beautiful device we’ve talked about on a few occasions, and our Portal Admin WillVerduzco reviewed recently. Having used one for the last few months, I have to say it’s a terrific device, a sleeper some would say in the mobile world populated with “Big Things” and “Ones”.

Once the ROM booted, I immediately made my way to the Security Settings and was quite delighted to see a few nice options:

  1. Guest Mode – you are able to assign a separate access for guests and can restrict them to certain activities.
  2. Application Encryption – this is misleading as it’s not really encryption but instead application locking. You are able to lock down specific applications via a password or swipe-lock.
  3. Holiday Mode – essentially the same as the long-standing CyanogenMod Quiet Mode option.

The Settings themselves are still sorted into different tabs,  à la TouchWiz and something they had in previous versions, with the difference to TouchWiz being that these actually make sense and look to be more refined compared to previous ROM iterations.

The visual aspects of the new ROM are great. The transitions are much smoother and make much more sense than before. The notifications are nice and crisp, though it’s a bit confusing how to “dismiss all,” as the broom icon at the bottom isn’t inherently obvious. Once you click it though, they all disappear nicely.

They have a built-in theme engine with what looks to be crowd-sourced themes as well as a nice (albeit TouchWiz-esque) implementation of the Android stock Calendar. Upon further digging, it seems Oppo is including their own implementation of GO Keyboard, but without all of the privacy concerns that come from GO’s intrusive ad system as part of 3G.cn.

I like what I see in this new firmware from a strictly aesthetic standpoint, and look forward to seeing exactly where this lands. There is also the hope that Oppo takes the user experience, including their personal and data security, seriously in this post-PRISM era.

Device Review: Oppo Find 5

June 20, 2013   By:

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All too often, major device manufacturers such as HTC, Samsung, and Motorola steal the thunder with their announcements and product releases, leaving little room for smaller OEMs to enter the market. Today we’re going to put aside the HTC One and Samsung’s Next Big Thing to talk about the Oppo Find 5, the Chinese company’s first foray into the global market. READ ON »

paranoid-android-halo

Little more than a few days ago, there was word from the guys behind Paranoid Android that they were working on a new feature called Halo. Similar in form and function to the “chat heads” feature of Facebook Home, Halo was intended to bring a new level of multitasking to Paranoid Android ROMs by allowing the user to receive notifications from apps and act on them from a floating or “windowed” version of the app in question.

Despite still being at an early stage with a lot of development still to be done, the PA guys have clearly been hard at work over the past few days and decided to release some test builds featuring Halo for public consumption. This is by no means a final version and there will be bugs, some of which are mentioned in a recently posted FAQ for this new feature. There now seems to be a build available for most of the devices officially supported by PA, which now includes the Oppo Find 5. For those of you without an officially supported device, I doubt you will have to wait very long before this makes its way into many of the unofficial Paranoid Android ROMs that are out there.

All that remains now is to see how this functionality holds up in the long run, specifically in regard to playing havoc with Play Store apps, which may not take kindly to being manipulated in this way. There does not appear to be any sort of white list for completely compatible apps in place with Halo, and as to whether or not that results in the same challenges faced by the CyanogenMod after attempting to integrate Cornerstone remains to be seen. For the time being though, Halo seems to be very well received by PA fans.

These most recent builds can be downloaded from either the Google+ post linked above or from the relevant forum threads here on XDA which are linked below. Please note that there is currently no forum thread available for the Oppo Find 5.

xda-cm-pa-oppo-collab.fw

Here at XDA, you’ve probably seen us talk about collaboration. The dictionary defines collaborating as “to work with another or others on a joint project.” We take collaboration seriously, so much so that we actually frown when we see members of the community not take it as seriously. What makes us even more upset is when manufacturers don’t take it seriously, though that rant is for another day.

There have been numerous instances of OEMs that have claimed to be “developer-friendly,” but whose actions spoke louder than their words. On the other hand, there are only a few instances of OEMs actually having their actions match their words, with one of those being Sony over the last 12-18 months and another being a relatively new entry to the Android world, Chinese manufacturer Oppo. If you recall we’ve spent some time discussing Oppo’s recent wins in the Android space, not the least of which is their GPLv2-required release of kernel source for the Find 5. On the surface this is not that noteworthy given it should already be done by default, however with Chinese manufacturers that is not a given. Given the negative track record of Chinese manufacturers adhering to licensing, Oppo is doing something extraordinarily rare by signaling a desire to position themselves in the Western market. Unlike other Chinese companies (Huawei comes to mind), Oppo is showing they have some understanding of, or are attempting to learn, what it takes to succeed.

As OEM Relations Manager for XDA, it is my job to contact OEMs and build a dialog with them. This usually starts with establishing a relationship where XDA, with its 5 million users and tremendous independent developers, and the respective OEM can begin to discuss ways to collaborate (there’s that word again) on win/win opportunities. Sometimes it is met with open arms, as has been the case with Oppo. When approached with the idea to work together with XDA in growing development, we immediately began to discuss ways to facilitate collaboration (!) to bring about a good relationship with the developer community.  We also knew that in order to make any collaboration a win/win for both parties, there would have to be value for the OEM.

After those initial discussions, I spoke with some veteran CyanogenMod maintainers (and members of the now-defunct Team Hacksung) XDA Elite Recognized Developer Entropy512, and Recognized Developers XpLodWILD and nebkat, about their interest in taking on a new device and bringing CM to it. All three were definitely interested, and I began working together with them and Oppo to make it happen. After a few weeks, CM10.1 was brought to Nightly status by the team.

Oppo was ecstatic, and so recently I reached out to XDA Recognized Developers, and Paranoid Android developers, molesarecoming and aaronpoweruser, about their interest in such a project. As was expected, their answer was in the affirmative. And after just a few days, aaronpoweruser posted on G+ that he was close to having an alpha build of PA soon.

All of this hasn’t come easily though, given the state of Oppo’s kernel source. The kernel source that was released was not fully GPLv2 compliant as it was released late (though better than some other companies we could name), had different config files (debug worked, release didn’t), and the kernel source has not been updated even after they’ve made kernel updates on recent firmware updates. With all that being said, the teams have done a great job bringing their respective projects to where they are today. And with language and cultural barriers between our developers and theirs being what they are, Oppo does appear to be trying to overcome those issues.

We know you look forward to seeing the great things that are bound to come out of this collaboration. And to the other OEMs out there, take this as a suggestion: It doesn’t hurt to embrace the developer community, and only makes your stock rise in the eyes of that community. When that happens, the word will spread, and consumers (who incidentally are highly influenced by what members of that developer community have to say about your products) will follow with their currency. It’s a cycle which can, and should, be repeated. If you’re interested, contact me and XDA.

Jordan0315

A new bill was released in congress addressing the SIM unlocking ban. That story and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is OPPO Find 5 source code release. Jordan talks about the rooting options for the Sony Xperia Z.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer Steve gives a Windows Phone App Review of Freda, XDA Developer TV Producer and newcomer Steve released a video on the Basics of Tasker, and XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Android app review showdown with Sidebar taking on Glovebox. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

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Often times, device manufacturers seem to think the GPL license that governs the Linux kernel used in Android is merely a suggestion rather than a legal obligation. Unfortunately, these are usually devices coming from manufacturers few of us have ever even heard of. And due to the lack of popularity in regions where GPL is properly enforced, these violations often go unnoticed.

The OPPO Find 5 is an intriguing device. Featuring a powerful 1.5 GHz Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, an outstanding 5″ 1080p display, and a healthy 2 GB of RAM; the device certainly had the right hardware. In fact, we even took a closer look at said hardware, thanks to Adam. However, even with the high end specs and purposefully designed innards, it was still the odd one out. Luckily, we’ve seen kernel source appear in unlikely places. And now, we get the chance to add one more to the mix.

Ideally, news of this kernel source release wouldn’t be cause for a highlight here on the XDA Portal. In a perfect world, rather, we would see complete kernel source release prior to device launch for every device. However, that’s unfortunately not the case now. That said, these are baby steps towards the goal of overall GPL compliance. Let’s hope that in the future we can continue to see GPL compliance from these lesser known manufacturers. And while the device has only been available for around a month, we wish to see these releases prior to launch. Until then, let’s at least be happy with these efforts.

Kernel devs who fancy the device’s unique hardware and wish to get started with development can get to the goods by heading over to the source links below.

Source: Github via Oppo Forums

[Image courtesy of XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler's unboxing hangout]

Jordan204

It’s been a slow news week, but there were still great news stories that hit the Portal at XDA-Developers this weekend. Jordan reviews all the important stories from this week, such as the Xperia Jelly Bean lockscreen ported to all Xperia Devices.

In application news, Jordan talks about using a custom DPI without causing Google Play headaches. Also, you can play embedded videos with Airvidplay. Jordan talks about the new rooting procedure for the Oppo Find 5 using CASUAL by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler . Pull up a chair and check out this video. And if you any news to report, feel free to contact a News Writer.

READ ON »

OppoFind5

Here at XDA, we love devices, and we love to see what we can do with them. We love playing with different devices so much that sometimes we import them from China, like the Meizu MX. In this episode of Unboxing the XDA Way, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler unboxes the Oppo Find 5. This device was just released for purchase yesterday in China. This device is quite fast, and the 1080p screen is something to be admired

AdamOutler starts by doing what he does best: tearing the device apart and examining the hardware components. However, there are some drawbacks to this device such as how GPL-compliant kernel source is not yet available. Furthermore, you have to use a special ADB binary to access the device. So check this video out, it is not to be missed.

READ ON »

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