• 5,737,660
    REGISTERED
  • 46,538
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: Oracle

Google-vs-Oracle

You may recall that in the middle of 2010, Google and Oracle began a bitter and somewhat protracted battle in court to decide whether Google infringed on Oracle’s patents during the creation of Android. Essentially, this all boiled down to the question of whether APIs can be copyrighted. But in the middle of 2012, Judge William Alsup ruled that these APIs were not copyrightable. And by doing so, the first chapter or Oracle vs Google came to a close.

Of course back then, we all expected that Oracle would appeal this ruling—and so they did. Now, a three-judge panel in the US Court of Appeals ruled to reinstate a jury’s finding of infringement on 37 Java API packages. But now, one crucial detail remains to be determined: whether Google’s use of the 37 Java APIs falls under “fair use.” As such, the Federal Circuit panel has ordered further proceedings under the Judge Alsup to determine whether this is the case.

Until we find out whether Google’s actions were protected under fair use, it remains to be seen what (if any) impact this will have on Android itself in the near term. However, this certainly has deep implications for future cases involving APIs and software interoperability. Where do you stand on all of this? Sound off in the comments below!

[Source: Reuters, FOSS Patents | Many thanks to Recognized Developer AdamOutler for the tip!]

Jordan

In today’s Quick Take of This Week in Development, Jordan takes time out of his Memorial Day weekend to cover a couple stories of interest from the XDA Portal. In some exciting Android and patent news, Jordan talks about the Google versus Oracle debate. Jordan mentions a couple neat developments on the XDA-Developers Forum, from the Facelock Face Recognition Locking App for Gingerbread and getting Android notifications on your desktop with DeskNotifier. Jordan then talks about the Custom Ice Cream Sandwich ROM for the Desire S.

Finally, Jordan mentions our new Pro Tip video on XDA TV. So check out this Memorial Day episode of XDA TV. XDA TV and its staff thanks the families and troops that gave their lives for our freedom.

READ ON »

Advertisment
Google-vs-Oracle

We’ve been closely monitoring the growing patent dispute between tech titans Google and Oracle from various perspectives. Fans of Google’s mobile OS can now breathe a little easier as Google has officially triumphed, with a jury dismissing most of the charges against the company. In dispute were two patents that Oracle claims Google infringed upon involving core Java API’s. Even though the jury found that Google infringed on the patents, they were not unanimous on the matter of fair use. Therefore, all but two of the charges were dismissed, with Google paying a predetermined fine for each of them.

While not a perfect victory, Google has finally managed to stave off the ravenous greed of Oracle for the time being, although appeals are set to follow. At the very least, the Android community can breath easier knowing that it will not be called Oracle Android anytime in the near future. Head on over to The Verge to have a look at the actual verdict sheets.

Enjoy your victory Google, I know I will.

Jordan 6

This week on the XDA Portal, we saw many important stories. To give a run down of these stories, XDA TV Producer Jordan returns with another episode of This Week in Development.

Jordan mentions the Apple versus HTC patent wars and court battles. In more big, rich companies versus other rich companies news, Jordan updates us on the Oracle versus Google trial. In more Google news, the limit on device deauthorization on Google Music is discussed. The lamentable actions by Motorola and the locking down of their devices is mentioned. Finally, Jordan urges you to go check out  XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler’s Galaxy Nexus tear down and unboxing.
READ ON »

Oracle-vs-Google

The case which, was proclaimed by some to end Android or raise the prices of future Android devices, is turning out more favorable by the day for Google and its star OS. If you haven’t already read our primer on the topic, now would be a good time to do so.

At the end of the day on Tuesday, the closing statements for phase 2 of the trial were issued by each side and a rather humerous transaction between Oracle and the Judge took place.

Quoted from Groklaw:

Judge: We heard the testimony of Mr. Bloch. I couldn’t have told you the first thing about Java before this problem. I have done, and still do, a significant amount of programming in other languages. I’ve written blocks of code like rangeCheck a hundred times before. I could do it, you could do it. The idea that someone would copy that when they could do it themselves just as fast, it was an accident. There’s no way you could say that was speeding them along to the marketplace. You’re one of the best lawyers in America, how could you even make that kind of argument?

Oracle: I want to come back to rangeCheck.

Judge: rangeCheck! All it does is make sure the numbers you’re inputting are within a range, and gives them some sort of exceptional treatment. That witness, when he said a high school student could do it–

A major portion of the Oracle’s claims are based on 9 lines of code contained within Java.Util.Arrays.rangeCheck().  Here is the code in question:

  792       private static void rangeCheck(int length, int fromIndex, int toIndex) {
  793           if (fromIndex > toIndex) {
  794               throw new IllegalArgumentException(
  795                   “fromIndex(” + fromIndex + “) > toIndex(” + toIndex + “)”);
  796           }
  797           if (fromIndex < 0) {
  798               throw new ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException(fromIndex);
  799           }
  800           if (toIndex > length) {
  801               throw new ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException(toIndex);
  802           }
  803       }

This block of code can be very much simplified if we remove some jargon.  We have some exceptions thrown.  An exception’s job is to print some information. And if left unhandled, an exception will stop the application from running. We also have some variables.

Lets simplifiy the exceptions down to printing errors, and lets simplifiy the  integer variables down to A, B, and C.  I’ve writen the following pseudo-code to demonstrate the simplicity of this method in question.

rangeCheck(integer A, integer B, integer C) {
  if (B > C) {
    print(“ERROR: B is invalid because it is greater than C”);
  }
  if (B < 0) {
    print(“ERROR: B is less than 0″);
  }
  if (C > A) {
    print(“ERROR: C is greater than A”);
  }
}

At the beginning of the day on Tuesday, Google offered Oracle a grand total of 2% profit from Android.  Oracle declined.  At the end of the day in court on Tuesday, it seems that 2% would have been more than generous on Google’s part.

So lets do a quick recap of what’s happened so far. The trial was broken into three Phases: Patents, Infringement, and Damages.

Phase 1 was left unconcluded, as there has not yet been a ruling on whether APIs can be copyrighted.  Considering the implications of copyrighting an API, it would not make sense to give this one to Oracle. If API copyrights were granted, every plug-in or 3rd party tool for any application ever created would automatically be subject to scrutiny.

Phase 2 seems to be going in Google’s favor.  What Google is infringing upon is an accidental 9 lines of code and 8 test files.  The test files were never released in Android, and therefore should be considered irrelevant as no profit was generated from them directly.

We shall see in Phase 3 how the trial will go. I, for one, am interested to see how Oracle can prove that the 9 lines above could possibly damage their profits or business.

Source: Groklaw.net

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa

  • Nexus 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Galaxy Note 3 (T-Mobile) buy | sell
  • HTC One M7 (Verizon) buy | sell
  • Galaxy S 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Nexus 7 2013 buy | sell
  • Swappa is the official marketplace of XDA