POSTS TAGGED: permissions

XDA Xposed Tuesday: DonkeyGuard, Don’t Be a Donkey, Control Your Device – XDA Developer TV

donkeyguard

Some applications ask for the world when it comes to permissions. I have spoken to developers who say it’s better to ask for permissions you don’t need, than you have to ask for more permissions in an update. However at some point, you may want to tweak information for certain apps.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you take full control over your device. XDA Senior Member CollegeDev created the DonkeyGuard module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.. . . READ ON »

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App Ops Brings Granular Permissions Control to Android 4.3

Android-4-3-Permissions

Say it with me: It’s about time! While not officially released yet (and although similar functionality has been possible via root in the past) granular permissions management is unofficially on its way to stock Android. In fact, if you’re willing to take a few seconds to create a custom shortcut, an incredibly easy task on most aftermarket launchers, you can access it now from any Android 4.3 device. There’s even a simple option for those more content with the stock Android 4.3 launcher as well.

Thanks to some sleuth work done by Ron Amadeo over at Android Police, App Ops was discovered in the current build of Android 4.3 (JWR66v). Getting it to work is as simple as creating a custom shortcut . . . READ ON »

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Android Permissions: Permissively Insecure?

privacy

Android, as an operating system, is fairly unique in that it makes users aware of the permissions available to apps in a fairly transparent way. Compared to Blackberry or iOS, which issue granular prompts such as “Can Angry Birds access your location?” or “Can Instagram access your camera to take photos?” There is a somewhat subtle difference here: The rivals give the user a choice about these requests.

Jump over to Android where, after installing an app, it has free reign to use every permission you agreed to. While this doesn’t sound an issue, let’s take a look at the Play Store. Let’s look at a nice, popular app (for better or for worse): Facebook.

The Facebook ap. . . READ ON »

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