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Posts Tagged: Raspberry Pi

CasualGS3

XDA Elite Recognised Developer AdamOutler is at it again. Following up on his Verizon Note II root method, he continues to roll out safe and easy-to-deploy root exploits via CASUAL, the Cross-platform ADB Scripting, Universal Android Loader.This time, the device in question is the AT&T Samsung Galaxy S III.

One of the major benefits of CASUAL is that it is cross platform. Adam has been spending a great deal of time in bringing support for many different platforms to a consistent level. If you have him circled on Google+, you may have already noticed him tackling the OS X upgrade process in an effort to test these exploits for Mac users. That’s where you come in. Adam is especially keen to hear from users of both OS X and various different Linux distros about how CASUAL functions for them. It even works on the Raspberry Pi, so if you want to test it out on one of those and report back, I’m sure it would be much appreciated.

This latest mod will root an AT&T Galaxy SIII incredibly easily, as CASUAL handles the download and installation of drivers and runtimes. The end result is a fully rooted device courtesy of Elite Recognised Developer Chainfire’s CF-Auto Root. This will work even for those who are already rooted, so if you’d simply like to help test for compatibility you can do so without unrooting beforehand.

So if you have an AT&T SIII, rooted or not, what are you waiting for? Head on over to the development thread and lend a hand in making this the ultimate cross platform utility.

raspigpio

During his presentation at last years Big Android BBQ, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler gave a presentation and showed off a box that was able to automatically root a phone. Dubbed the “Root All The Things Box,” all you needed was to plug in a device and watch the LED indicators on the box. And in a couple minutes the device would be rooted. This magic box was built on a Raspberry Pi.

In this episode , Adam shows how to manually turn on and off GPIOs on the Raspberry Pi. This is the same technique used in the operation of the Root All the Things Box. According to Wikipedia, General Purpose Input/Output or GPIO, is a generic pin on a chip whose behavior, including whether it is an input or output pin, can be controlled or programmed by the user at run time. So check this video out.

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raspberry pi

The Raspberry Pi is not only one of the most unique devices on XDA, but it is also among the most popular with developers. So far, we’ve brought you news of Raspberry Pi getting ICS, ADB support, and a supercomputer was built out of a bunch of them and Legos. It’s even made our Best “Other” device of the year. There is so much you can do with the little thing. Now, you can host websites as well.

XDA Senior Member marty331 wrote a tutorial on how to host a website on the Raspberry Pi. The list of required software and hardware is quite long, but the process itself is pretty simple. To get started, you’ll need:

Hardware:
Raspberry Pi
USB power cable
Ethernet cable and modem to connect to
HDMI cable (temporary need)
Monitor (temporary need)
USB mouse/keyboard (temporary need)
Standard SD card
SD card reader on your computer

Software:
Raspbian image – Debian based OS for Raspberry Pi
Lighttpd – lightweight webserver that is extremely easy to set up
PageKite – makes local websites or SSH servers publicly accessible in mere seconds, and works with any computer and any Internet connection.

Once you have acquired all of that, it’s simply a matter of following the tutorial step-by-step. You’ll run through downloading and installing some packages, such as lighttpd and giving your Raspberry Pi a static IP address. From there, it’s just a few more steps, and you have a website hosted on your Pi. While useful in its own right, this just adds yet another useful tool to the Raspberry Pi arsenal.

For more details, check out the original thread.

300px-RaspberryPi

The Raspberry Pi is an interesting little device. Designed to be a learning and education tool, it has a fairly large community and a loyal following due to its simple design and low price point. Now, thanks to some researchers at the University of Southampton, 64 Raspberry Pi’s have been coupled together with cables and Legos to form the perfect small scale computing cluster.

That’s right, Legos. Those little building blocks that have captured many a child’s heart and Raspberry Pi’s (which have captured many of those same children’s adult hearts) have been combined into a networked computing cluster. While the exact use for the devise has yet to be revealed to the general public, the coolness factor alone is off the charts.

Making things even better is the fact that the university has decided to release a guide on how to build your own. Of course, if you’re interested in more than just building your own, head on over to the university’s website for the rest of the details, and give this beast a look.

And if any forum members decide to build their own, bigger version of this, definitely let us know!

Jordan BBQ

This has been another great week at the XDA Portal. XDA Developer TV Producer Jordan covers all the news you need to know to keep up-to-date on mobile phone developments. Jordan mentions the Raspberry Pi getting ADB. Jordan mentions this week’s XDA Developer TV Videos, with XDA Developer TV Producer Lance continuing his Windows App series and XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviewing FTP Server Ultimate.

In Jelly Bean news, Jordan mentions Android version 4.1.2 available for the Motorola Defy and Defy+. Finally, Jordan talks pairing an Xbox 360 controller with your Nexus 7. Pull up a chair, and check out this video.

 

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raspi_blue_white

There are several small PC kits for people to have computing power in the palm of their hands. Many of these are actually, low powered devices usually loaded with Android or some kind of Linux distro, whose sole purpose of existing is to—well, we are still not sure about that one, but it certainly fills a size gap in between laptops and tablets. That said, not a single one of these ultra-micro-small PC kits compare in popularity to the infamous and nearly impossible to get Raspberry Pi. In fact, just yesterday we gave the device its own home here on XDA.

The Raspberry Pi has gained so much steam over the last few months that it has brought together developers from across XDA to discover the secrets it holds. This is versatile, so much so that one of our favorite developers and hardware hacker extraordinaire, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler, decided to try his hand at porting one of the most useful features found in Android devices—and succeeded!

It seems that ADB (Android Debug Bridge) was a bit of an impossibility but not entirely unreal. Because of this, Adam tried for a few days to compile and port ADB over on the pie, but as with any work of this kind, bugs were coming in from all different directions. And that is where the beauty of this community kicked in as other devs with backgrounds different than Adam’s started showing up in the thread making suggestions and offering their help in other areas. Progress was still going until XDA Forum Member trevd made a post stating that he was able to get the port running. He went ahead to set up a github tree for everyone to take a quick peek at the work done and to try and get it running on other ARMv6 devices as well.

Needless to say, please take this for a spin if you have a RPi and leave some feedback for the devs if it worked well.

 Update: trevd has managed to make a proper adb 1.0.29 frm source. For those who wish to simply use the binary, you can download it here

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

forums

Last week, we added forums for a couple of devices that stood out in their own unique way. These were, of course, the Intel-powered RAZR i and the relatively diminutive Galaxy S III Mini. This week, we have a few new forums to add as well.

To start things off, we have the Raspberry Pi due to popular demand. While not exactly a “mobile device,” the device features an architecture extremely similar to typical smartphone hardware. Furthermore, the excellent price and high degree of hackability only serve to sweeten the overall package and make it a must-have for any gadget lover.

Next, we have the LG’s late 2012 flagship phone, the Optimus G. Powered by the top-of-the-line quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, the device will be one of the speediest devices at launch. The category-leading processor is backed by 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of ROM, a 4.7″ “True HD-IPS+” panel, LTE connectivity, a 2100 mAh battery, and an 8 or 13 MP camera (depending on region). The device ships with Ice Cream Sandwich, but is slated to receive an update to Jelly Bean.

Leading the HTC pack, we have the One VX. The device comes in as the successor to the popular mid-range One V. Powered by a 1.5 GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Plus processor, it is also no slouch. The device also features 1 GB of RAM, 8 GB of ROM, a 1810 mAh battery, and LTE connectivity. The device features a Sense 4-laden build of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich out of the box, and comes with a 4.5″ qHD Super LCD2 screen.

Finally, we have the Desire X. Looking to cater to value-conscious users, the HTC Desire X is an affordable cousin to the One series. Powered by a 1 GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processor (albeit based on the ARM Cortex A5, rather than Qualcomm Krait) and packing 768 MB of RAM, the Desire X doesn’t quite pack the same punch as its flagship brethren. That said, it offers more than adequate performance for those who don’t need the highest benchmark scores or simply prefer a smaller device.

Can’t wait to join in on the discussion? Head over to the newly created forums!

Giant Squid of Anger

Our friend Jordan loves rehashing the news so much that he did it twice for us today. After some technical annoyances and a snazzy haircut, Jordan finally gets a video to complete successfully. Today, Jordan gives a quick update of the awesome news that appeared on the XDA Portal like how CyanogenMod 10 was unofficially ported to the HTC G1.

Jordan mentions the HTC source petition and the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 rooting guide articles. Finally, Jordan mentions the Raspberry Pi’s upcoming update to Ice Cream Sandwich and XBMC ported to Android. What are you waiting for? Hit play!

 

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Raspberry_pi

Late last year, we added the Hardware Hacking forum to help spawn discussion between developers and users in hacking the latest hardware platforms. Over the past year, the tech world has seen a number of new hardware platforms enter the marketplace like the Kickstarter project Equismo Smart TV and the Raspberry Pi. All of these provide a number of advantages including portability and hackability. The Raspberry Pi has stood out as a great option for many different uses, from being a Linux desktop to a Media Center and more. Android has been a seemingly obvious choice for the Pi, giving someone all of the advantages of an Android smartphone in a micro-desktop form factor and a cheap price tag.

The makers of the Pi recently announced on their blog that a member of their development team had begun working on porting Android 4.0 to the device, and was making steady progress:

Hardware-accelerated graphics and video have been up and running smoothly for some time; AudioFlinger support is the only major missing piece at the moment.

They promise that as soon as there is a Release Candidate, the source code will be released so that others will be able to make use of what they’ve accomplished, and the many exceptional developers on XDA will have the tools that they need to contribute to the community.

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