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Posts Tagged: Samsung Captivate

unbrickable

XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler is a hardware wizard. He can tear apart devices with ease. He can even use some Level 20 spell to turn a phone into a development board, a device that you cannot brick. If it does become “bricked,” you just hook the device up again and reflash kernel and everything.

In today’s episode, after quickly tearing down the Samsung Captivate, he continues by showing how to achieve the right amount of voodoo to get the phone into the proper mode. He then shows you how to manipulate the development board phone on your computer, how to flash XDA Elite Recognized Developer Rebellos’s firmware, and start playing with the device. Check out this video.

READ ON »

CyanogenMod-10-CM10-Jelly-Bean

We recently told you about the CyanogenMod team beginning work on CM10. Now, a significant milestone has been reached: CM10 Nightlies have appeared for select devices. For those who aren’t familiar, a nightly build is an automatic build incorporating the latest changes in CM source for a device. Yesterday, CyanogenMod released the list of those devices that would be getting the first round of nightlies:

# The US SGS3 variants (AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint)
# The Galaxy Nexus variants
# The Nexus S varaints
# The Nexus 7
# The Transformer and Transformer Prime
# The SGS1 variants (VibrantCaptivateInternational, and i9000b)
# The SGS2 i9100g
P3 and P5 tablets

That list will grow as other devices become ready and receive the blessing from their maintainers to begin nightlies. Be sure to keep your eyes open for when your device joins the list.

Update: We’ve received various reports from XDA Forum Member Scotto70 and others that the Nexus 7 build is currently nonfunctional. So if you’ve got a N7, we recommend that you hold off for the time being!

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Slim Bean Android ROM

With the release of the Jelly Bean source code to AOSP last month, we are seeing more and more of Jelly Bean ROMs ported to various Android devices. Slim Bean is the Jelly Bean variant of the popular Slim ICS ROM, and it is now available for several devices including the Samsung Vibrant, Nexus S, Galaxy Nexus (Verizon, sprint, and GSM variants), Samsung Captivate, and Samsung Galaxy S I9000.

Slim Bean’s predecessor Slim ICS has been quite popular as a very lightweight and fast AOSP-based ICS ROM, with just the right amount of tweaks and mods added to it, including some by the ROM developer and others from AOKP and CyanogenMod. With Slim Bean, XDA Recognized Contributor krarvind aims to bring the same features to Jelly Bean, while still keeping it fast and lean in the tradition of his previous work.

You can download all variants of Slim Bean ROMs from the Slim ROMs website. Below are the links to the device-specific threads for Slim Bean where you can find more details and join the discussion:

Capture

Today’s XDA TV video shows XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler setting up a better http://AdamOutler.com with an Android device.  He replaces his old ARM V7 CORTEX M3 Texas Instruments Eval-Bot web-server with a newer ARM V7 CORTEX A8 Samsung Captivate.

AdamOutler shows a neat use for an old Android device. Additionally, he attempts to explain beginner and intermediate networking concepts in a simple way.  The web server used in this video is the standard Linux Lighttpd package obtained from the BotBrew Basil repository.  This lightweight and flexible web server can power any client-side processing site.

READ ON »

Devil Kernel Config

There are a lot of tool kits out there that help users modify their ROM and how it works. They can add scripts, mods and tweaks to boost anything from performance to battery life. One portion that doesn’t get as much attention is the kernel. There are a few kernel tool kits out there, although they tend to be a little more complicated than ROM based ones. Users of kernel tool kits get access to all kinds of system tweaks that you can only get with a kernel. For the Samsung Galaxy S and all of its variants, there’s a kernel tool kit that’ll help users tweak all kinds of settings.

The application is called Devil Kernel Config, and was developed by XDA Forum Member philbring. It does have a few limitations. Users must be rooted, be running ICS, and be running Devil kernel in order to get everything to work correctly. There are also a few settings that do not stay past a reboot. This is a problem that is promised to be fixed before the next release.

A few features of the application include:

RAM Settings
Toggle ZRAM/Swap
Devil Idle
Toggle Screen Off – Min/Max Frequency

While some of the features can be found in CPU control applications, a few of the settings are unique. Users of the application have also been requesting features, so there may be more to come.

For screen shots, download links, and more, visit out the application thread.

618px-Over_9000_Vector_by_Vernacular

Heimdall Suite, an Open-Source Cross-Platform set of tools designed to flash firmware to Samsung devices, has received an incremental update to version 1.3.2. This latest update supports Galaxy S II GT-I9100, Galaxy PlayerCaptivate, Vibrant, Fascinate, Mesmerize, Epic 4G, Galaxy S 4G, Infuse 4G, GT-I9000T, Galaxy Tab (7 and 10.1 inches) and of course the Galaxy S GT-i9000.  If your Samsung device is not listed here, testing is required.

Heimdall has always been a favorite among kernel developers and those who frequently flash the latest kernels because no flashable update.zip or Odin packaging is required.   A Heimdall user can simply put their device into Download Mode, and click a button to flash a new zImage directly. XDA Recognized Developer Benjamin Dobell‘s  latest release improves compatibility with Loke (the flash receiver on the device) and expands comparability to several new devices.

In the words of the developer:

Version 1.3.2 addresses some compatibility issues with several devices i.e. the Galaxy Player 5.0 and Galaxy S II. In particular the “Failed to confirm end of file transfer sequence!” error should no longer occur under regular use. This was fixed by mapping a previously unknown protocol parameter, which I’ve now called “chip identifier”, to information in a device’s PIT file. A big thanks goes out to XDA developers user ambrice, who helped identify the cause of the issue.

Head on over to the original thread , get the source code , and check out the official product page.

 

captivate-nexusS-galaxyS

With the recent news that the Samsung Galaxy Note i717 could be hacked to work on T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network, many inquisitive and adventurous users on XDA began to wonder if other devices could benefit as well. XDA Forum Member pwneman looked into what other Samsung devices had compatible radios and found that the Nexus S i9020a for AT&T uses its radio hardware much the same way as the Samsung Galaxy S i9000, and to a limited extent, the Samsung Captivate. Flashing the devices with the Nexus S radio image not only worked, but seemed to yield noticeable benefits (at least on the i9000).

So I found out that the Nexus S radios are indeed compatible with our device. I downloaded some of the hot radios for the Nexus S (KB3 and KF1) and opened them up and found that the Nexus S uses radios (similar to how the captivate/galaxy s uses modems). So I just renamed the radio.img from the Nexus S radios to modem.bin, placed it in an existing cm7 modem package and flashed it via CWM (ICS).

I reboot and get a constant 5 bars of signal. My signal hasn’t dropped from this 5 bars of signal in the last 10 hours (usually it fluctuates from 5 to 3 bars). HSDPA speeds are pretty fast as well. I got speeds of 560 kb/s DL at 3 bars of signal and 140 kb/s Upload. I’ve never ever gotten that high speeds.

If you fancy giving this a shot, and have taken all the necessary precautions like donning your own designer tin-foil hat, proceed to the Galaxy S thread to get started. You can also give it a try on the Captivate, however there have been reports that the 850 MHz band may not work after flashing and that connectivity may be a bit sporadic.

satellite1

One of the biggest, most common problems with GPS receivers on mobile devices has been the fact that they tend to become buggy and as a result, they have difficulty getting satellite locks. This issue has plagued devices since the times of the venerable Vogue and the Polaris (both Windows Mobile devices for those of you who just got introduced to the world of smartphones). We all thought that as time went by, things would get better and for the most part, they did. There were devices last year that still did suffer from faulty GPS receivers or at least suffered from code problems and the Samsung Galaxy Captivate was one of them. XDA member mikel.canovas created a thread with a method that he found while browsing our fora that will consistently allow the GPS in the Captivate to get a lock on within 5 seconds, even being indoors!

The fix itself seems to work for every Gingerbread ROM out there, which is a great piece of news as you will not have to ask your favorite chef to make this tweak compatible with it. The mod itself is a modified gps.conf that replaces the original one found in  /system/etc/gps.conf. Mikel.canovas also suggests that changing modems to the KG3 also helps quite a bit if the above does not work.

Well, if you are still using the Captivate and suffer from these issues, this is your chance to put this matter to rest. Please take it for a spin and post your results and feedback in the thread.

Who this is for - anyone whose GPS has long lock times, and is inaccurate in navigation. 

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Thanks reinbeau for the tip!

samsung captivate

If you’re a ROM flashing addict (and, truth to be told, you should be if you’re visiting this site), you probably don’t even know that the Samsung Captivate, AT&T’s version of the Galaxy S, didn’t get its official Android 2.3 Gingerbread update up until a couple of hours ago. But for everyone else running the stock ROM, you can now look at Samsung’s instructions for applying the update, which sadly requires the dreaded Kies software. But better than nothing, eh?

Here is a changelog provided by Samsung:

New User Features

  1. Download Management.
  2. Intuitive Text Input.
    • New layout for larger fonts and easy inputs
    • Word prediction. Multi-touch for numerical input (Shift + Numbers)
    • One-touch Word Selection and Copy/Past

UI Improvements

  1. Fixed Top-menu in Gmail.
  2. Voice Search added into the search categories.
  3. Vertical play mode added for YouTube.

Of course, there’s a nice forum thread where you can discuss this latest and last major update – the Captivate, just like its other Galaxy S brethrens, isn’t going to get any official Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich love.

11x05101719

Ice Cream Sandwich ports are highly sought after, given the hype and price of the phone that runs it. However, providing there is support behind development, there is every chance you can run it on your device. This article is here to list the current ICS ports on our most popular  forums and their individual stages in progress. Should your device not be listed below, you can always visit your device’s development forum on XDA and search for any ROMs listed with “Ice Cream Sandwich”. Check out our list! READ ON »

unbrickabel

It looks like the Unbrickable device, the Samsung Captivate, is still receiving lots of attention from XDA Recognized Developers AdamOutler and Rebellos. These two have been going at it for some time and effectively turned the device into an unbrickable piece of hardware, no matter what you flash on it, you cannot permanently brick it. Adam recently released the UnBrickable Mod for the Captivate and in this new iteration, he has made the unbricking process as simple as having a 1 wire connection and making a single click on your Linux loaded PC. As amazing and unbelievable as this sounds, there is a lot of blood, sweat, tears, and a score of 4 dead devices behind this work.

Rebellos also goes on to explain the theory behind the core of this mod, which is known as HIBL (Hummingbird Interceptor Boot Loader). It is quite an interesting read if you are into reverse engineering. So, make sure that you look into it if you want to understand the “under the hood” concept of this mod.

Last but not least, AdamOutler is asking for volunteers to borrow devices from that are equipped with a CORTEX-A8 processor in it will do. It does not have to be functional as the dev will need it to remove the processor from it. The dev promised to return it once he is done. You can find a list of devices in this thread. So, if you have a broken phone from this list laying around in your house/office and would like to put it up for a good cause, now is your chance.

After months of research and development, both hardware and software, and no less then 4 phones destroyed for the cause…. I’m happy to announce UnBrickable Mod is a matter of modifing your phone once, with a single small wire. From that point on, you can click a button to unbrick. 

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Thanks AdamOutler for the tip!

The UnBrickable Mod and Beyond

August 28, 2011   By:

UARTonCaptivate

A bricked phone.  No JTAG.  Modify hardware, upload a bootloader, and the phone lives.  Pure development.

That’s what I think of the work of AdamOutler and Rebellos to breathe life into dead devices.  A couple days ago, WillVerduzco wrote an article on Rebellos’ method of unbricking Hummingbird devices by uploading your very own custom bootloader to your device.  A couple weeks ago, AdamOutler asked for help getting the official Samsung bootloader for Galaxy devices.  Since then, the two teamed up to put Rebellos’ Resurrection Bootloader on devices modified according to AdamOutler’s UnBrickable Mod.

Now they’re finding the fun doesn’t stop at unbricking phones.  They’re flashing bootloaders built for other operating systems.  “I used UnBrickable mod to install Bada OS bootloaders on my Captivate,” AdamOutler says.  “Totally bricked it.  Messed up partition tables and everything.  It assimilated my Captivate.  I used UnBrickable mod to load up a secondary bootloader while holding the key combination, then flashed it.”  He goes on, “I was worried for a bit because it would not download, but eventually we got it!  It works!”

This means the months of hard work put into this project finally paid off.  AdamOutler working on hardware, Rebellos working on software.  Once the hardware side of development finished, Rebellos stepped in.  “You see,” AdamOutler says, “Rebellos is a developer working on a port of Android for Bada OS.  He’s 18 years old, from Poland, just got his driver’s license, and he’s a badass behind the assembly language console.”

Samsung Galaxy devices normally boot using a primary bootloader to load a secondary bootloader that, in turn, loads the Linux kernel.  Rebellos replaced the primary bootloader.  That means they should be able to load non-Linux systems, like Windows Phone 7 or iOS.  Rebellos says that will take, “tons of work in pure assembler, as they aren’t opensource.”  He adds, “I’d say for SGS family you can count on Bada and any opensource OS, like Ubuntu.”

To put it clearly, the work these developers put into this project means the beginning of HD2-like development on any device with a CORTEX-A8 processor in it, including the  iPhone 4 and Nexus S.  And that’s exactly what AdamOutler and Rebellos plan to do.  “We basically created a whole new system for developers to use for developing and noobs to use for unbricking after playing with the big kids.”  Pure development.

The developers are currently looking for bricked and broken CORTEX-A8 phone donations, such as these:

Samsung I9000 SGS
Samsung S8500 Wave
Samsung S8530 Wave II
Samsung SGH-i997 Infuse 4G
Samsung T959 Vibrant
Samsung SGH-T849 Galaxy Tab 7.0 inch
Samsung GT-P1000 Galaxy Tab
Samsung GT-i9010 Girogio Armani Galaxy
Samsung GT-i8350 Omnia 7
Google Nexus S
Apple iPhone4

If you would like to help out with this historical work, please see the development thread.

broken_phone_l

How would you like to create your own bootloader? Sounds a bit daunting, no? Aside from the inherent “cool factor,” having this ability could get your device out of some tough spots that would otherwise require the use of JTAG.

Thanks to the work of a team lead by XDA Recognized Developer Rebellos, this is now possible for Samsung S5PC110-based (read: Hummingbird) devices. Since there are quite a few Hummingbird-powered devices roaming about XDA, this can prove quite useful for when ODIN is not enough or if your JTAG pins are nonfunctional.

In the words of the developer:

What is it?
Info how to bypass secure booting mechanism built in S5PC110 CPU’s iROM on lowest level and create code loadable even with totally damaged bootloader, without use of JTAG.

Okay, how useful is it?
I’ve got no clue, it all depends on you. Our main target, which is almost done, is ability to revive any hard-bricked hardware built on S5PC110 without use of JTAG (for eg. when JTAG pads had been damaged)

In order to get started, venture forth to the original thread.

[Thanks AdamOutler for the tip!]

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