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Posts Tagged: Samsung Galaxy S 5

call recording

Call Recording is a feature used by a lot of people for a variety of different reasons. Unfortunately for users of certain devices, the feature isn’t always available by default. This is true in the case of the Samsung Galaxy S5. And although the feature is there, it’s not accessible without a little modification by the end user. There are various ways to enable this functionality, the simplest probably being the use of an Xposed module. But for some people, that may not be an option. So for those of you who do not or cannot use Xposed to enable call recording, help is at hand.

XDA Senior Member _alexndr has put together a simple yet comprehensive guide to enabling call recording in one of three ways. The modification itself is achieved by editing an XML file tucked away within the device’s /system partition. Simply add the appropriate code to the relevant line and you are good to go. For those you aren’t confident in making these changes manually, _alexndr has provided the changes in the form of a .zip that can be deployed either via Mobile Odin (for those who wish to avoid issues with Knox) or the more traditional custom recovery route.

This method is aimed primarily towards carrier branded variants of the device, but the script will check for alternate locations in which to make the necessary changes if the default location is not found. That said, it’s not guaranteed to work on an international version and you may need to do a little digging to find the appropriate location in which to make the changes. You will of course need a rooted device to achieve this. It may also be possible to adapt this method to work on other Samsung devices and firmwares as well. If call recording is a feature that you feel is missing from your device then check out the Call Recording guide thread for more details.

Snapdragon 801 PVS BIN Guide

Anyone who’s ever delved into the world of overclocking will readily tell you that this is a field where the old adage “your mileage may vary” most definitely applies. But while individual luck of the draw will vary from chip to chip, there are certain factors that influence how well a particular chip overclocks or how low of a voltage it can put up with at any particular frequency.

Component manufacturers are well aware of this, and often use factors such as transistor leakage to selectively “bin” processors according to how highly they can clock or how little voltage is required to reach a certain clock. This then allows manufacturers to get the most out of any individual unit.

All of this factory optimization isn’t to say that we as consumers can’t do a bit more optimization themselves. This is after all why we are still able to overclock and undervolt our own components. But unfortunately, we don’t often have access to the binning data of our particular components. And even if we know the PVS bin for our particular device, we rarely know how this fits into the larger overall picture with regards to other devices of the same chip.

XDA Recognized Developer HD2Owner decided to make things a bit more straightforward by creating a table and chart with all known PVS bin data for the Snapdragon 801 processor. The data is specifically for the HTC One M8 (2014) and Samsung Galaxy S5, though it may also be of use to owners of other devices powered by the 801. And with this information, users will have a rough idea of what voltages to try at certain frequencies.

Those looking to learn more about Snapdragon 801 binning can head over to the original thread.

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towelroot

If you’ve ever owned an iOS device or a Sony PlayStation 3, you’ve more than likely heard the name George Hotz. Otherwise known as XDA Recognized Developer geohot, this New Jersey-based hacker gained notoriety for his work in jailbreaking and otherwise hacking the aforementioned devices. Now, using a recently discovered Linux kernel vulnerability, geohot has managed to root the Verizon Samsung Galaxy S 5.

The root exploit itself is built around Linux kernel CVE-2014-3153, which was recently discovered by hacker Pinkie Pie, and it involves an issue in the Futex subsystem that in turn allows for privilege escalation. Although expressly released for the Verizon Galaxy S5, the root exploit will realistically be compatible with practically every device with an unpatched kernel–which at this point should be nearly every device not running a recent nightly build of a custom ROM with a patched kernel. As such, it has also already been tested and found to work with the AT&T Galaxy S5, Nexus 5, Galaxy S4 Active, and AT&T and Verizon variants of the Note 3.

If you’ve got a Verizon Galaxy S5 or any other previously unrooted device and you want to get in on the root action, head over to the original thread and give towelroot a try. And if you need some background music while you root your device, head over to Geohot’s SoundCloud to listen to a song released 10 days ago advertizing Towelroot.

[Many thanks to XDA Developer Admin Pulser_G2 for the heads up and information!]

Galaxy-S5-and-Galaxy-S4-Android-4.4.3-600x340

It’s now been a week and a half since Android 4.4.3 was initially released. In the time since, we’ve seen quite a few devices receive Google’s latest tasty treat. Naturally, this first came in the form of updated factory images for Nexus devices, but this was quickly followed up by updates to a number of “Moto” devices. Now, if the latest rumors are to be believed, Android 4.4.3 is nearing release for certain variants of Samsung’s current and previous generation flagships, the Galaxy S5 and Galaxy S4.

You may recall that one week prior to its official release, leaked Samsung documentation indicated that Android 4.4.3 was in active development for certain variants of the S4 and S5. Now according to rumors originally posted by the folks over at AndroidGeeks, it looks like this update is on the verge of release.

Just as previously thought, the devices poised to receive this rumored update are the Galaxy S5 (SM-G900F and SM-G900H) and Galaxy S4 LTE-A (GT-I9506). And according to the same source, the updates will come later this month for both variants of the S5 and some time next month for the S4 LTE-A. The updates are set to come in at firmware versions G900FXXUOBNE6 and G900HXXUOBNE3 for the G900F and G900H, respectively, while the S4 LTE-A is poised to receive firmware build I9506XXUQDNE4.

Of course at this point, these are only rumors. However, given the track record of Samsung rumors in the past and how minor of an update Android 4.4.3 is, we wouldn’t be surprised if Samsung is able to pull it off.

[Source: AndroidGeeks | Via Phandroid]

XDA Forums for the LG G Watch, Samsung Gear Live, and Asus Padfone X

We recently added new forums here on XDA for two recently announced and highly anticipated devices. The new devices are the HTC One E8, which is set to be released later this month, and the Sony Xperia T3, which will come at some point in Q3. While we were at it, we also changed a few things to make it easier for developers to post and maintain cross-device variant builds for several Samsung devices.

First up, we have the HTC One E8The E8 is a lower priced version of the HTC One M8 flagship device. The E8 retains most of the M8 technology, but the metal casing is replaced with a polycarbonate design. Another stand out difference from the M8 is the E8 loses the dual sensor 4 MP camera, and instead features a traditional 13 MP camera. The E8 has the same 5″ 1080p Super LCD3 display, 2 GB of RAM, and Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 2.3GHz processor as its older brother. The device is powered by a reasonable 2600 mAh battery.

Next up is the Sony Xperia T3. The T3 is an upcoming high end device, whose claim to fame is being the world’s slimmest 5.3-inch smartphone–at least for now. This device features a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor running at 1.4 GHz, 1 GB of RAM, 8 GB of internal storage, a 13 MP image sensor, and a 720p 5.3″ display. While not flagship material for 2014, the device’s slim 7.0 mm profile will more than make up for this in the eyes of many users.

Finally, you may have noticed some tweaks that we’ve implemented into certain Samsung forums recently. We now offer unified development forums for the Samsung Galaxy S 4, Galaxy S 5, and Galaxy Note 3. Inside, developers will be able to post development work that is compatible with all variants of the aforementioned devices. For example, if you have a build that works with all variants of the S5, you no longer have to create and maintain multiple threads. Instead, you can simply place your thread into the S5 unified development forum and call it a day. With the large number of device variants, this should make it significantly easier for developers to support and maintain their cross-variant builds.

Samsung-KOT49H-UpdateReport

You may recall that back in November of last year, we shared a leaked Samsung internal memo detailing the OEM’s tentative plans for updating its Galaxy line up to Android 4.4 KitKat. And with the exception of the canceled update for the International S3, this schedule has mostly held true, as we’ve seen KitKat roll out to many of the Korean company’s newer high end devices. Now, more internal documentation has appeared, giving us a clearer picture of what Samsung’s working on in its internal labs.

First up, we have the Galaxy S5 (SM-G900F and SM-G900H) and Galaxy S4 LTE-A (GT-I9506). According to internal Samsung documentation from five days ago, Android 4.4.3 KTU70 is now being actively worked on for these three device variants. For the S4 LTE-A, the firmware in progress comes in at version XXUDQNE4, and for the two S5 variants, we’re looking at versions XXU0BNE3 and XXU0BNE6. The builds for all three device variants are currently in the integration stage, which means that Samsung is adding its OEM customizations to the firmwares. Assuming all goes well with the integration and testing, it’s not unreasonable to speculate that we may see 4.4.3 arrive on these three devices in the next couple of months.

Next up, we have more information regarding Android 4.4.2 KOT49H updates for various older Samsung devices. According to the leaked documentation, Android 4.4.2 will make its way out to the Galaxy S3 LTE, Note II LTE, and Note 3 Neo later this month. Then some time next month, the S 4 Mini, S 4 Mini LTE, Grand 2, Mega 5.8, and Mega 6.3 will receive their own official Android 4.4.2 builds. Unfortunately, the update for the standard (1 GB RAM) S3 is still marked as “unstable,” and given Samsung’s public statement on the matter, it’s increasingly unlikely that this will change in the near future.

Do you own any of these Samsung devices and are you looking forward to these OEM-provided updates? Or instead, have you rooted and installed an AOSP-derived custom ROM? Let us know in the comments below.

[Source: Sammobile]

Screenshot_2014-05-22-07-39-07_1_

Two popular Samsung devices are receiving OTA updates today, and they are the Samsung Galaxy S 4 LTE (GT-I9505) and the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S 5. While the former brings a new device mode and the latest evolution in KNOX technology to the S4 LTE, the latter provides the T-Mobile S5 with bugfixes and a few new tricks.

First up, we have the Galaxy S 4 LTE (GT-I9505). Today’s 130 MB OTA brings the device to firmware revision XXUGNE5. In addition to boosting overall performance, the update also brings two features from the S5 to the aging S4: kids mode and Knox 2 technology, which is expected to roll out to all other Knox-enabled devices in due time.

Next, we have the T-Mobile Galaxy S 5. This 131 MB update bumps up the T-Mobile S5 from firmware ANCH to ANE5. According to T-Mobile’s support documents, it brings a fix to an issue that caused intermittent incoming SMS / MMS failure. But as pointed out by XDA Recognized Developer BeansTown106, it also brings with it many of the  same goodies as we recently saw in an update to the international variant such as fixes to the fingerprint scanner and camera, as well as a rebase to Android 4.4.2_r2.

These two updates should start making their way out to consumer devices in the coming days. However, not every device will be in the initial wave. Luckily, the folks over at Sammobile have mirrored the ODIN-compatible files for the S4 LTE and T-Mobile S5. And if you’re looking for a pre-rooted build, we’ve got you covered as well. XDA Recognized Contributor iB4STiD shared a pre-rooted and slightly tweaked build for the S4 LTE, and XDA Recognized Developer BeansTown106 will soon create a pre-rooted build for the T-Mobile S5.

[Many thanks to XDA Portal Supporter Titokhan for the tip!]

plusblue

Although there are dozens of great source-built, AOSP-derived custom ROMs available for the choosing, the most popular option is still undoubtedly the first large-scale project of its kind: CyanogenMod. Because of this, it’s always quite exciting when official CyanogenMod support is extended to any particular device. Now we’re happy to share that official support has been added for two new devices, with two more on the way.

First up, we have CyanogenMod nightlies for the HTC One M8 (2014). Official support for the M8 actually began two days ago, and the buildbot has been chugging away ever since, offering three publicly available nightly builds to date. As described on CyanogenMod’s Google+ announcement post, these “m8″ builds are compatible with the GSM, Sprint, and Verizon models. In other words, this is compatible with 0P6B10000 (International), 0P6B12000 (AT&T/Dev Edition), 0P6B13000 (T-Mobile), 0P6B16000 (Telus/Rogers Canada), 0P6B20000 (Verizon), and 0P6B20000 (Verizon) devices. These nightlies are brought to you courtesy of CM developers deck, invisiblek, h8rift, toastcfh, flinny and xInterlopeRx.

Next up, we have the Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4. Official support for the ‘mondrianwifi’ began earlier today, with one nightly build available to date. The maintainer for this device is CM developer crpalmer.

Finally, we have the Sprint Galaxy S5 (kltespr) and the LTE version of the Samsung Galaxy Note 8.0 (n5120). Development for these devices will come courtesy of CM developers Xda Garwynn, Esa Laukkanen, and Scott Brissenden. Unfortunately, there aren’t any nightlies available for either of these devices just yet, but be happy to know that they’re on the way.

Head over to the CyanogenMod Download page for your device to get started:

And once you’ve gotten CM11 on your device (or to read up on guides to obtain root, flash a recovery, and flash a rom), head over to your device-specific forums for the HTC One M8 (2014)Samsung Galaxy Tab Pro 8.4Sprint Galaxy S5, and Samsung Galaxy Note 8.0.

s5bloat

Uh oh—what’s this? An OTA update that brings even more bloatware to an already bloated device? As we’ve seen several times in the past, US carriers have the tendency to not only preload their devices with bucketfulls of bloatware, but also even add more bloatware through OTA updates.

Today’s victim is the AT&T Samsung Galaxy S5. As initially discovered by XDA Senior Member abraxo, the AT&T S5 received a 47 MB OTA this morning to firmware version G900AUCU2AND3.

So what could be so special as to require an update straight from America’s second largest carrier? Could it be an update to the much rumored Android 4.4.3? Nope. What about new features? Nope—well, not unless you consider bloatware to be a feature. Alas, today’s update primarily brings four new pre-loaded applications: Yellow Pages, Lookout, Find My Mobile, and Reactivation Lock. Well, to their credit, it does also bring a fix to the previously wonky recent apps button.

It’s unfortunate that not only must we as consumers deal with bloatware from the factory, but also through OTA updates. Make your way over to the update discussion thread to get in on the rant. You can also learn more about the update on AT&T’s site. And if you wish to revert to the stock firmware, don’t worry, you’re covered. But even if you skip this update, it’s almost certain that the next OTA will contain this added bloat, so this is even more reason to root the device once root is available for the AT&T S5!

futurehand80

Well folks, today is  day and Samsung’s “Next Big Thing” is officially here. And although certain South Korean carriers decided to jump the gun and sell the device a bit early, today marks the device’s official worldwide launch date.

So now that you’ve either gotten your grubby little paws on an S5 or you’re eagerly awaiting delivery from your friendly postal courier, you may be wondering what to do with the device. Well, since you’re reading this, there is absolutely no doubt that you’re going to want to root it and get started with a few (or several) mods. But with so many variants, it’s sometimes hard to find exactly what you need for exactly your model.

/r00t

Let’s start with root access, as that’s what’s on everyone’s mind. If you may recall a few weeks back, we talked about how XDA Senior Recognized Developer Chainfire managed to root the SM-G900F International Qualcomm variant of the device ahead of release. Since then, Chainfire has been hard at work, bringing CF-Auto-Root to more variants of the device.

So which devices can be rooted today? Glad you asked:

Naturally, more are on the way, and Chainfire will continue to update this post once stock firmwares become available for other variants.

/recovery

Once you’ve attained root access, you’re probably going to want to install a custom recovery. Thankfully, XDA Recognized Developer Phil3759 has a unified build of PhilZ Touch recovery (which is built on CWM Touch) available for all variants of the device. And so far, it is known to be compatible with the Canadian, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, and International variants of the device. From here, you can perform some essential tasks such as creating a Nandroid backup, and installing custom ROMs and kernels once they become available.

/efs

You’re also probably going to want to backup that EFS partition. Luckily, XDA Recognized Contributor ricky310711 created an EFS backup and restore app that should be compatible with the A, F, H, and T variants of the device.

/xda

Finally, and this should be a given, you should bookmark your device’s appropriate home forum. For the vast majority of versions of the device, that is the . But if you’ve got one of the US carrier variants of the device, make your way over to the AT&T Galaxy S5T-Mobile Galaxy S5Verizon Galaxy S5, and Sprint Galaxy S5 forums.

Are you the proud owner of a brand new Galaxy S5? If so, feel free to gloat in the comments below, and don’t forget to let us know about your journeys in r00t!

Jordan0328

Android 4.4.2 KitKat for the AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note 3 is rolling out! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is the announcement of Sony has made some Open Source archives available for the Sony Xperia Z2 and Z2 tablet and how Chainfire rooted the Samsung Galaxy S 5 ahead of it’s release! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for Gesture Control. He then showed you how to root the Samsung Galaxy Gear. Finally, he gave us an Android App Review of Shareboard. Pull up a chair and check out this video.
READ ON »

futurehand80

The  isn’t even officially available yet, but that hasn’t stopped development for the device. Earlier, we talked about how a system dump appeared, enabling users to begin work porting Samsung’s latest proprietary applications to older devices.

Now, the International SM-G900F variant of the device has been rooted, courtesy of none other than XDA Senior Recognized Developer Chainfire. Root comes in the form of Chainfire’s popular CF-Auto-Root, which is essentially the easiest entry point to root access for those looking to stay close to stock firmware.

Using CF-Auto-Root is easy. Simply flash the CF-Auto-Root package as “PDA” in ODIN while your phone is in download mode, and CF-Auto-Root will do the rest. This pacakge will install the SuperSU binary and APK, as well as the stock recovery. However, it should be noted that this root method will increase your flash counter and trip your KNOX warranty flag.

If you’ve already got your hands on the SM-G900F or simply want to congratulate Chainfire on yet another device rooted ahead of release, head over to the original thread.

section_0_product

While the iterative  didn’t exactly set the world on fire with its hardware upgrades over last year’s already great Galaxy S 4, many were quick to express their regard for the new device’s software features. And while the vast majority of users will never use all of the goodies baked into Samsung’s TouchWiz and related apps without actively going out of their way to do so, the point is that these features are there.

Rather than wait for the S5’s release and upgrade to a whole new device, wouldn’t it be nice to bring some of its software features to older devices? The fine folks over at Sammobile recently got their hands on a firmware package for the S5. The package comes in at version G9009DKEU1ANCC, and it packs Android 4.4.2 layered with all of Samsung’s interface tweaks.

Not too long after the firmware release, XDA Senior Member Pako7 was quick to extract a system dump for the stock firmware, as well as give some additional hardware details to those looking to start porting. Finally, XDA Recognized Contributor friedrich420 has gone ahead and deodexed the ROM for derivative development purposes.

Obviously the system dump is of absolutely no use for end users. However, it’s a great resource for someone looking to port a few apps or the entire ROM from the Galaxy S 5 to other devices. To get started, head over to the original thread.

[Many thanks once again to XDA Portal Supporter Titokhan for the tip and to Wuby986 for the heads up on the Deodexed ROM!]

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