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Posts Tagged: Samsung Galaxy S II

flymeOS

When the Meizu MX was first released, many talked about its unique FlymeOS. It’s an OEM skin similar to Samsung’s TouchWiz and HTC’s Sense. It has several fun features and a very nice looking interface. Unfortunately, it was only available on the Meizu MX. It has now been ported to the AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II.

XDA Senior Member estabien has begun porting Flyme OS to the AT&T Galaxy S II. It’s a slow process, as it usually is when porting OEM skinned ROMs. There are a few things working, but many bugs as well. Here’s the list of things working and not working:

What works:
Wifi
Data/etc.
Both cameras
SMS
Most everything

What doesn’t work:
Cannot hang up on call (Have to reboot in order to hang up)
Some system settings FC
Doesn’t read SD card
Music Player doesn’t display music
Please report if anything else doesn’t work!

The essentials (data, signal, SMS) do work, but there are a lot of things that still don’t. So this likely won’t be anyone’s daily driver right now. It’ll definitely be fun to test. But for many, it may be best to wait a few more updates for some of the bugs to get squashed.

If this looks like something you’d like to try out, go to the original thread.

pacmanROM

We’ve recently reported on a number of devices receiving a port of the increasingly popular PACman ROM. The most recent recipients being the HTC Desire S and Desired HD. The ROM, originally developed by XDA Senior Member szl.kiev for the Sony Xperia Ray, is a concoction of the best bits taken from Paranoid Android, AOKP, and CyanogenMod, all thrown together into one awesomely featured ROM.

We can now report that the Samsung Galaxy S II has also received a PACman port, courtesy of XDA Senior Member bluefa1con. The ROM is available for both Galaxy S II I9100 and I9100G.

The ROMs are almost fully functional, with only a minor list of known issues and bugs:

  • HW Composer (I9100 only)
  • Minor Graphic glitches
  • CM10/ AOKP bugs
  • Some Feature Missing (to be added in future)

As always, you should read the complete opening post and follow the installation instructions. Otherwise, you may run into problems.

If you want to try out this fully featured ROM, head on over to the I9100 or I9100G thread.

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Samsung Galaxy S II

It is one thing when there is a software fault with a device. Software faults can usually be fixed either by the OEMs or, well, by us here at XDA. Hardware faults, though, are a whole lot more difficult to deal with. In some instances, like with the HTC One X hardware issue, it forces many people to return their devices. Another device with an annoying hardware fault is the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S II.

An issue that seems to be getting more common is the power button sticking when pressed. This throws the phone into a boot loop that lasts until the button becomes unstuck. XDA Forum Member evilmika made a list of the symptoms for users to check and see if they have this problem:

1. Black screen with intermittent vibrating
2. Phone restarts during boot animation
3. Unable to enter recovery before phone restarts
4. Unable to enter download mode before restart
5. USB JIG forces phone into download mode and restart occurs
6. Phone turns on when battery is inserted

There isn’t an official fix, or even a very good one. However, evilmika has posted a short guide that will at least alleviate the problem until a better fix is found. Essentially, users would tear down their phone based on the official iFixit tutorial and use a tool to separate the power button cover away from the mechanical button. It’s likely that this process will eventually have to be repeated, but temporary relief is still relief. Also, this does require that you disassemble your phone, so use the utmost caution when doing so.

For more details, check out the original thread.

TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

LGUI30

We bring you news quite frequently about launchers ported to various devices. It’s always a good time and gives users a chance to check out what other devices are running. The Samsung Galaxy S II I9100 can now not only run the Samsung Galaxy S III TouchWiz launcher with the Galaxy Note grid, but LG UI 3.0 as well.

XDA Forum Member endrit9 posted the TouchWiz UX launcher for all to use. Using it is pretty easy, as it requires a simply APK installation. Some of the elements are a little harder to get, however. For instance, to get the Galaxy S III icons, you have to use desktop visualizer and put them in manually. However, you’ll end up with the Galaxy S III TouchWiz launcher up and running.

For LG UI 3.0, XDA Forum Member Gyebro has ported it specifically to the Galaxy S II from the original mod by XDA Senior Member Impact7. A few of the features include:

5×4 homescreen grid (instead of the original 4×4)
Slightly modified weather widget
Google search bar and “add to homescreen” button removed from the top
Fixed unread messages count, now works with samsung messaging
And of course all the features that the launcher offers originally (amazing screen scroll effects, fast and smooth, LG themes – see original thread, today display on calendar icon, and much more..

The installation process is nothing we haven’t seen before. Put the APK in /system/app and change the permissions. There are also some optional APKs to install if you want more of the LG look and feel.

If you’re looking to try out a new launcher, check out either the Galaxy S III TouchWiz Launcher or the LG UI 3.0 thread.

sdswap

Quick, simple, and dirty. Some of the best hacks around on XDA require very little to get them to work, and make your life easier in the process. Also, these “simple tricks” tend to fix major snafus from some manufacturers when it comes to so-called features that make you ask “What in the world were they thinking?” So is the case for many Samsung Galaxy devices.

One common complaint is how external storage on Galaxy devices is “weird” (for lack of a better word). Samsung coders decided to treat the internal storage on the device as the external part, which forces several apps to save data, settings, and more to this part of the device. This is impervious to flashing, so it is not that dangerous and your data stored there will survive a flash. However, people seem to like the idea of removing the SD card to use it elsewhere, as well has having the USB storage data for ALL their apps stored within.

With this in mind, XDA Forum Member jocala developed a quick app with a simple GUI that allows the user to switch the destination of the external SD card where it belongs—on the external SD card. The dev has only tested this on the Samsung Galaxy Exhibit, but it should work on other devices so as long as the /system/etc/vold.fstab file matches.

A full Nandroid back up is strongly recommended before attempting this. Please take it for a spin and post your results, including phone model, in the dev’s thread.

A common complaint about some Samsung Gingerbread phones is the fact that they mount the relatively small internal sd memory as /mnt/sdcard and this memory is treated as the phone’s primary removable storage by some apps, ignoring the “real” removable sd card that Samsung refers to as “/mnt/sdcard/external_sd”.

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

wpid-DSCF3557j_raxqeqh.jpg

Let’s face it, there really isn’t a camera on a smartphone that can handle low light as well as most of us would like. Some times the images are too dark, other times they’re too low grainy. And in some cases, there’s even focus stuttering. This unfortunately plagues some Samsung Galaxy S II units. Thankfully, not all cameras are affected—just devices with the CDEF02 camera module. Now, there’s a way to mostly fix it.

XDA Forum Member KINGTATu noticed that when lowering the camera’s ISO setting, the issue went away. As KINGTATu explains:

n iso 100 and 200 u would Never have Low-Light Stuttering and its not dark while recording its just a bit draker even less than setting exposure from 0 to -1

Naturally, lowering ISO makes taking low light pictures a bit more difficult, as you need to have a steadier hand. However, if your main concern is the focus stuttering, this could help.

For more info, check out the original thread.

[Image credit: XDA Forum Member bartekaki]

SPlanner for Galaxy S II

Have you tried out the Galaxy S III and love the exclusive bundled apps? Do you want those apps, but find yourself satisfied with last year’s Galaxy S II and don’t want to shell out your hard-earned cash just to get those apps? You don’t have to, thanks to your beloved developer community here at XDA.

In May, we shared with you the new TouchWiz Launcher from the Galaxy S III ported to the Galaxy S II, and just a few days back, we brought you news that the floating Video Player from Galaxy Note had been ported as well. Now, the S-Planner app from the SGSIII has also been ported to work on the SGSII.

Ported by XDA Forum Member mythtrandyr, this app has been edited to work properly on the lower screen resolution of the SII. All the features are fully working except for the widgets, which require some changes to adjust to the SGSII’s screen size. The developer is working on a fix, and it will be available in a future version.

You can find more details and download the app in the forum thread.

Wakelock

One would think that after so many years, things like wakelock would be done and over with. It isn’t, however, and developers and users alike are still dealing with such problems to this day. However, as new wakelocks continue to appear, now workarounds and methods to fix them continue to are developed. The AT&T Samsung Galaxy S II Skyrocket is no exception, as there is now a way around practically every known wakelock.

The guide was written up by XDA Senior Member Jrockttu, and includes quite a bit of information. It begins by having users check their chargers, as certain charging configurations have been shown to cause wakelocks. It then talks about various software wakelocks that have been found by various XDA community members, and ends with the proclamation that all stock ROMs are lacking—something we don’t necessarily disagree with.

After everything has been identified, Jrockttu then gives users the known workarounds for each issue. In some cases it’s quite easy, such as finding out what chargers are causing the issue so one does not use them anymore. Additionally, debloating has been found to help out as well. Others are more complicated and don’t have a direct fix outside of buying a better battery or switching ROMs and hoping for the best. But hey, knowing is half the battle, right?

For more information, check out the original thread.

Galaxy Note Video Player for Galaxy S II

Do you love the resizable pop-up video player from Samsung Galaxy Note and wish it were available on your Galaxy S II? While Samsung isn’t officially providing it for the SGS II, that doesn’t mean our members here at XDA aren’t doing anything about it. XDA Forum Member mythtrandyr has successfully ported this player from the Galaxy Note to SGS II, making it available for all of us to install on our devices.

The player works on all stock and custom Android 4.0.4 ROMS based on Samsung’s TouchWiz firmware including XWLQ5/LPM/LPO/LPT/LPU/LPX. It will not work on non-TouchWiz ROMs or any ROMs based on Android 4.0.3 or earlier. While it is built for deodexed ROMs, it can be made to work on an odexed ROM by simply deleting videoplayer.odex file from /system/app using ADB, Terminal Emulator, or a root access file manager of your choice.

You can install it by grabbing the flashable zip from the forum thread and flashing it to your device from recovery.

DirectoryBind for Android

Many Galaxy S II and III owners who do a lot of heavy gaming on their phones have run out of space for game data in internal storage. While both of these devices support external SD cards, there is no official method available to use that instead for the storage. Fortunately, there is an easy solution for this problem now with free tool DirectoryBind.

Originally built for the SGS II by XDA Forum Member slig, DirectoryBind has been confirmed to work on SGS III and Galaxy Tab 2 by many, and may work for more devices too, as long as they are rooted and have a similar partition structure. As the name suggests, DirectoryBind binds a directory in one location on your device to another. While the concept behind it is similar to symlinking, it uses the bind command instead that makes it work across file systems. This is particularly important, as the file system used on the external SD Card is usually FAT or FAT32, and the internal one is Ext 3/4, making symlinking impossible.

The app has a decent GUI that makes it easy to create new directory pairs, manage the existing ones, mount or unmount them manually, choose to automatically mount them at system startup, and even set them to automatically unmount when USB storage mode is activated and remount when it is deactivated.

You can download the app and learn more in the application thread.

ADA

Around here, many users enjoy various AOSP-derived ROMs. There are quite a few options, including such well known ROMs as CyanogenMod, AOKP, and ParanoidAndroid. There are many more options as well, which is great because the more the merrier.

Now, the Android Developer Alliance development team has released the AffinitySERIES ROM to various devices. Their missions statement is pretty simple, as explained by ADA member, and XDA Recognized Developer, blueHarford:

One of our biggest things is No Drama, no secrets, BIG on communication which i think alot of other teams lack. We are not the best we will not boast ourselves or ever use the word kang. We feel like one of the first teams to start AOSP project to where it truley is part of the open source community. Were not out for recognition were out to make good products.

The initial release includes the Verizon and GSM Galaxy Nexus and the Nexus 7. These new ROMs bring some old favorites, like Theme Chooser, but also bring a number of features including:

Fast, Responsive, Intuitive & Professional UI
GLaDOS v2.1 Power Kernel Built In
First of its kind Customized Toggle Icons
Custom Awesome Popup SMS Features
Facebook Contacts Support
Custom Power Widget
4 Way Reboot Menu
Exclusive ADA Wallpapers
5 Way Lock Screen Targets
Beautiful Weather Lock Screen
Quiet Hours
Voice & Data (SVDO)
T9 dialer
SuperSU
BusyBox
Customized Navbar Settings
Statusbar Customizations
Modified Navigation Bar Options
Clock Modifications – Left, Center, and Right Clock AM/PM Weekday Abbreviation
Battery Options 6 Styles to Choose
Theme Chooser
Many, many more…!

Users are reporting that the ROM works well and has very few issues. Most are reporting no issues at all, which is great for a Jelly Bean ROM. Now that the initial release is out of the way, the team is looking forward to the host of other devices they plan on supporting in their second round of releeases. The official list includes:

Asus Transformer TF101
Asus Transformer Infinity TF700
Samsung Galaxy Tab2
Droid RAZR/RAZR MAXX
Samsung Galaxy Nexus (toroplus)
Samsung Galaxy Note
Samsung Galaxy SII and SIII

If you’d like to learn more, check out either the Verizon Galaxy Nexus thread or the GSM Galaxy Nexus thread, both posted by XDA Senior Member purian23.

Recoveries

Many Samsung Android users rely pretty heavily on Odin or its Linux / OSX counterpart Heimdall. This isn’t an overly big deal as both applications are stable for the most part and do the job. However, if you’re going to be rooting and hacking your device, you should probably get used to things like Terminal commands anyway. Aside from the obvious fact that learning such commands are useful, learning to use them can mean not having to increase your flash counter any more than absolutely necessary. T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S II users can now do this by installing recovery from command line.

Written up by XDA Senior Member PorchSong, the method is pretty easy to follow. Users are directed to go to the official ClockworkMod Recovery website and download a recovery image for their device. From there, place it on your internal SD card, and use Terminal Emulator to flash it.

Aside from showing users how it’s done, PorchSong also explains what the commands mean. So if you choose to follow the guide, you’ll get acquainted with the dd command and its usage. Learning anything regarding Terminal can be potentially useful for anyone with a rooted Android phone. Additionally, this method could be used on any Samsung device. All you’d need is the proper recovery image and the location of the proper partition.

To learn more, check out the original thread.

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