• 5,784,904
    REGISTERED
  • 52,130
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: Samsung Galaxy S II

CM9

Although there’s talk of CM10 around the web, developers aren’t quite done yet getting CyanogenMod 9 on as many phones as possible. With the first release candidate for CM9 released, developers have a great code base to bring an AOSP-derived experience to other devices. One such build is for the Samsung Galaxy S II HD LTE.

XDA Recognized Developer and Retired Senior Moderator dsixda is responsible for bringing CM9 to the highly underrated device. Despite not being the most popular version of the Galaxy S II, the port is very well done, with only a few minor issues. The list of current things working include:

- Wi-Fi
- Adobe Flash
- Play Store
- Vibration
- Hardware acceleration in browser
- Orientation sensor (model AK8975)
- Gyroscope (model K3G)
- Accelerometer (model K3DH)
- MTP
- Audio from speaker
- Video playback
- YouTube (including HD videos)
- USB mass storage
- Compass
- Rear camera (model M5MO) takes photos, and uses flash
- Bluetooth (and A2DP)
- GPS
- Phone
- 3G/HSPA/LTE Data
- SMS send/receive
- Headphone audio
- Torch app
- USB tethering
- Speakerphone
- Wi-Fi hotspot
- Lights on capacitive buttons
- Proximity sensor (model TAOS) for phone
- Ambient light sensor (model TAOS)
- Internal and external (micro) SD card access (Note: Internal SD is under /mnt/emmc, micro SD is ‘sdcard’)
- CPU frequency is being reported correctly as 1512MHz
- Backlight Notification (BLN)
- MHL (compiled into kernel but not tried yet)
- Overclocking

And the very short list of things not working:

- Front camera (model SiliconFile SR200PC20M) – Disabled for now; requires Samsung ICS update or ICS binaries from a phone that has the same sensor (I have yet to find one)

Although the feature list is impressive, this is still labeled as an alpha build. In other words, there may be unreported bugs in addition to the front facing camera. That said, the ROM can definitely be used as a daily driver for anyone who’s craving ICS on the Galaxy S II HD LTE. It should be noted that this will not work on any other device except for the Galaxy S II HD LTE, including any other version of the Galaxy S II. Of course, any developers who want to assist in squashing the remaining issues is more than welcome to do so.

For additional details, check out the original thread.

CPU Sleep

Improvements in technology always bring new challenges to developers. Of course, improving technology can bring rehashes of previous challenges to solve once again. One such challenge is battery life. With the release of dual core and quad core phones, the additional cores present a double edged sword. Multiple cores improve performance in certain situations dramatically, but most of the time they also require more power to operate. Taming the multi-core processors to provide better battery life has been the challenge for quite some time now, and many devices have solutions. Now, the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S II has one as well.

The script, which was written by XDA Recognized Developer eugene373 helps improve battery life by turning one of the two cores of the T-Mobile Galaxy S II off when the screen turns off. This lowers power consumption while screen is off, without compromising performance when the screen is on. The only drawback is that it’s only compatible with AOSP-based ROMs for the T-Mobile Galaxy S II. This means users running stock software won’t be able to use it.

For more information, visit the original thread.

Advertisment
Sense 40

It has been a long time coming. Many Samsung Galaxy S II owners have been clamoring for an HTC Sense port for a while now, with over 1500 users asking for it. There have been several attempts made with bits and pieces coming in, but the Galaxy S II has never had a bootable HTC Sense port. Now, not only is there a bootable Sense port, but it’s Sense 4.0—the latest and greatest version to date.

It took a lot of teamwork to get it this far. XDA Senior Member QuBe2 has kept track of all involved in the project and it’ll like be a lot more before the port is fully functional. So far the team, dubbed Team Sense4All, has gotten the ROM booting but aside from that, it isn’t quite clear what works and what doesn’t. It can be ascertained from screen shots, though, that data and phone service are among the things not working.

From here, it can be expected the development to start speeding up. One of the trickiest parts of getting any port to work properly is booting for the first time. From there, it’s fixing bugs until everything is working. So users looking forward to using Sense on the Galaxy S II will have to remain patient for now, as the ROM is developer-only at this point and will not cut it as a daily driver. As always, any developers who want to make the process less painful are more than free to jump in and help.

For more information, head over to the original thread.

Samsung-Galaxy-S-II-HD-LTE-Bell-Canada

Not that many people have heard of the Samsung Galaxy S II HD LTE. This device is quite similar to the AT&T Galaxy S II Skyrocket, but as its name implies, features a Super AMOLED HD display. In fact, other than the display resolution differences, the two devices are nearly identical, down to the Qualcomm Snapdragon S3 processor.

Despite the similarities, root methods and recovery software is incompatible across devices. Luckily, this is where XDA Recognized Developer dsixda, of DSIXDA ROM Kitchen fame, comes in. Thanks to his work, the device now has root, recovery, and a mildly debloated custom ROM.

The recovery itself comes in the form of an unofficial port of ClockworkMod Recovery v5.5.0.4. Installation is just a quick ODIN flash away, and once you’ve installed that you can install dsixda’s debloated and prerooted ROM. And if you’re after an even more debloated ROM, XDA Senior Member markdexter has taken dsixda’s base and modified that further with a greater debloat and slight theme changes.

If you’re looking to get started, head over to dsixda’s recovery and ROM thread. If you decide that you want to give markdexter’s ROM a shot, head over to this post.

[Thanks to markdexter and dsixda for the tips!]

sammybrick

By now, you’ve undoubtedly heard about the Samsung HardBrick bug that has reared its ugly head on various Samsung Exynos 4210-based devices including but not limited to the Galaxy Note GT-N7000Epic 4G TouchAT&T Galaxy S II, and the Korean SHW-M250S/K/L. In fact, we recently featured an app made by XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire aimed at determining your particular device’s risk for hard brick.

Samsung is aware of the issue, which was first noted by Elite Recognized Developer Entropy512, and is in the final stages of delivering a solution. Until then, however, it is still advised to not flash any leaked kernels, or kernels in which MMC_CAP_ERASE is present.

As seen on a Google+ post by XDA Elite Recognized Developer codeworkx:

We’ve contacted Samsung about the problem where performing a mmc erase could hardbrick your phone (i9100, i9100g, n7000, m250 – MAG4FA, VYL00M, and KYL00M with firmware revision 0×19 // T989 and I727 with fw rev 0×12) if it’s having a faulty emmc chip.
Read this thread for more informations about it: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1644364

They’re working as hard as possible on a clean solution which will be ready soon.

Please be patient and try to not flash any leaked kernels or kernels based on sources where MMC_CAP_ERASE is present.

In fact, earlier today Samsung contacted me to inform the community that progress has been made. In addition simply releasing a fix in the form of updated stock firmware, Samsung is also working with community developers to provide them the information they need to fix the issue in their own releases. This is important because binaries or patches released to end users require extensive (and time-consuming) testing. This way, however, developers can begin to incorporate the fixes as soon as possible.

We’re thinking two steps to provide.

One is to share the information that open source developers can use to fix the problem.
The second one is the patches applicable for both Official Samsung ROM users and Custom ROM users.

Due to our duties to provide more complete binaries to our customers, our patches require the full testing, which takes longer time.
That’s why we want to share the information first.

Good job, Samsung! It is commendable to see not only your team’s efforts to fix the issue, but also work with the community to ensure that the fix is disseminated as quickly as possible!

Those looking to learn more should head to the discussion thread started by XDA Forum Member androidindian.

[Image taken from egzthunder1's fantastic article on the matter.]

sammybrick

By now, we’re all familiar with the hard brick bug that’s plagued various Samsung when updating to leaked builds of ICS. The bug has shown up on various Samsung Exynos 4210-based devices including the Galaxy Note GT-N7000Epic 4G TouchAT&T Galaxy S II, and the Korean SHW-M250S/K/L.

However, as we quickly found out, not all eMMC revisions were equally afflicted. Instead, the 0×19 revision was highlighted as known bad, whereas the 0×25 is thought to be safe. Revisions between 0×19 and 0×25 are thought to be possibly bad, whereas those newer than 0×25 are probably safe. Adding insult to injury, those keen on hex will be quick to notice that 0×19 converted to decimal is 25!

Naturally, someone was bound to create a simpler way of determining the status of your device, and that someone is XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire. With his new app Got Brickbug, users can easily check their device to see their risk status for the hard brick bug. As explained by Chainfire himself:

Attached is a simple APK that reads out your chip’s type and CID, and lets you know if we know that chip is dangerous or safe.

Just uninstall again after using.

Obviously, this comes “as-is”, we’re not responsible what you do with your device, etc. No rights can be derived from the output of the program!

Internal data used:
MAG4FA, VYL00M, or KYL00M fwrev 0×19 –> known bad
MAG4FA, VYL00M, or KYL00M fwrev >= 0×25 –> probably safe
MAG4FA, VYL00M, or KYL00M fwrev != 0×19 && < 0×25 –> probably bad
Everything else: unknown chip

As this is relevant information for any flashaholic, we recommend you head over to the application thread to test your device.

[Image stolen from egzthunder1's fantastic article on the matter.]

Codeworks

The good news just keeps coming for the I9100G variant of the Samsung Galaxy S II. The OMAP4-based device just received an official dose of TouchWiz-laden Ice Cream Sandwich goodness a few short days ago in the form of the Android 4.0.3-based XXLPQ update. However, no matter how much you may tolerate or perhaps even enjoy a particular OEM skin, there are many out there who have one quest with new Android devices—loading an AOSP-derived ROM.

This is now possible on the I9100G, and it comes in the form of official CyanogenMod 9 nightlies for the device. The developer responsible for this achievement is none other than XDA Elite Recognized Developer codeworkx of Team Hacksung. As of now, the ROM appears to be highly functional, with only the following known issues:

The builds are already pretty stable and there shouldn’t be much problems while using it as daily driver.
All features except FM-Radio, Wifi-Direct and maybe TV-Out are working.
I’ve also added a touchkey backlight notification feature (Notification LED) and some other funny gadgets.

Aside from being highly functional, installation is also a breeze as long as you are running the ICS bootloader. If you’re not, or are unsure as to your bootloader version, the easiest way to make sure that you’re on the correct bootloader is to simply flash the aforementioned official ICS XXLPQ firmware release for the I9100G.

First time installing CyanogenMod 9 to your Galaxy S II, or coming from another ROM:
- READ FAQs: http://teamhacksung.org/wiki/index.p…sked_Questions
- Make sure you’re running ICS bootloaders! (if you’re unsure, flash a official ICS rom and proceed)
- Make sure you’re running a proper working ClockworkMod-Recovery
- Copy GApps and CM9 ZIPs to your internal SDCard
- Boot into Recovery
- Flash CM9 zip from internal SDCard
- Flash GApps zip from internal SDCard
- DO A DATA WIPE / FACTORY RESET (otherwise your device will be stuck at boot)
- Reboot
- Don’t restore Apps using Titanium Backup!Upgrading from earlier version of CyanogenMod 9:
- Copy CM9 ZIP to your internal SDCard
- Boot into Recovery
- Flash CM9 zip from internal SDCard
- Reboot

I9100G owners out there, we suggest grabbing a drink, heading over to the thread, reading up on the procedure, and flashing immediately. Those wishing to get a piece of the pie should head over to the ROM thread and visiting his development blog.

[Big thanks to Jiangyi for the tip!]

Galaxy S II toolkit

Given the convenience of all-in-one tool kits such as what we previously covered for the Galaxy Nexus, it would make sense for multi-purpose tool kits to show up on other devices. And now thanks to the efforts of XDA Forum Member ajster1989, the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S II has one as well.

The tool kit helps users do a variety of tasks including achieving root, adding a custom recovery, installing kernels, side-loading apk files, and much more. The feature list is quite comprehensive and includes:

- At start it checks to see if USB Drivers is installed, if it’s not installed will download and installs Kies for you. (This insures that your USB Drivers are correctly installed)
- At start it checks for USB debugging connection to ADB
- Phone selection menu to chose which SGS II phone you have, and set’s tool kit up for that phone.
- Only downloads the files for the phone you select (Currently only T989)
- Guides you through installing CWM
- Guides you through Rooting your device
- Guides you through Flashing a Custom ROM
- Guides you through Flashing back to STOCK (Auto downloads when needed)
- Reboots Recovery and Download
- Side Load APK’s
- Keeps track of your current phone, last flashed recovery, last flashed rom.

While most all-in-one tool kits seem to share the same core group of features, one particularly interesting feature in this particular one is the ability to keep track of what you have done with your device. While this may be helpful as a log of sorts, it’s also interesting to measure just how much of a flashaholic you really are. The developer is also working to port the toolkit to all other SGS2 variants.

For additional information, head over to the original thread.

unpacked2

What an exciting ride it has been for the Samsung Galaxy S III. The device was first rooted by XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire sight unseen and well before release. Then, as you may recall, we reported on the firmware leak for the device.

Subsequently, we saw a plethora of porting efforts that used the newly acquired leaked firmware to bring joy to older devices. Now, Samsung has extended the kindness yet again with an official firmware release for the SGS3. The previously leaked firmware build for the SGS3 came in at version I9300XXALE8. However, the officially released firmware weighs in at 9300XXALE9.

It is unclear at this time what, if anything, has changed between XXALE8 and XXALE9. The firmware itself is carrier unbranded, and is based on Android 4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich. Naturally, it also features Samsung’s newly renovated TouchWiz user interface, which we took a look at in our hands-on with the SGS3 at Samsung Unpacked 2012.

Samsung Galaxy S III Official Firmware

Base Firmware: I9300XXALE9 (4.0.4)
Region Africa
Country: Algeria
Carrier: Unbranded
Build Date: May 2012
Modem: XXLE9
CSC: OJVALE7
Change List: Coming Soon

Instructions For Flashing Firmware:

  • Extract the firmware
  • Open the included Odin
  • Put your device in Recovery MODE (Home + Volume up + Power)
  • Wipe Data/Factory reset
  • Wipe Cache
  • Take Out Your battery & put it back in
  • Put your device into Download MODE (Home + Volume Down + Power)
  • Click PDA and select *.tar.md5
  • Then finally click START! 

The Samsung Galaxy S II I9100G, which is the TI OMAP-based variant of the SGS2, also joins in on the official ICS fun. Samsung has released the official ICS firmware version I9100GXXLPQ for the device.

Base Firmware: I9100GXXLPQ (4.0.3)
Country India
Carrier: Unbranded
Build Date: 22 May 2012
Modem: GODDLP5
CSC: GODDLP7
Change List: 607196

Instructions For Flashing ICS:

  • Extract the firmware
  • Open the included Odin
  • Put your device in Recovery MODE (Home + Volume up + Power)
  • Wipe Data/Factory reset
  • Wipe Cache
  • Take Out Your battery & put it back in
  • Put your device into Download MODE (Home + Volume Down + Power)
  • Click PDA and select *.tar.md5
  • Then finally click START! 

Both the SGS3 and SGS2 I9000G builds originate from SamMobile, and were so generously posted here by XDA Recognized Developer Faryaab, who has brought us various leaked and official firmware releases in the past.

Those looking to officially upgrade their I9000G should check out the I9000G thread. Those looking to download the official SGS3 ROM and use it as a base for further development and porting should proceed to the SGS3 thread.

[Big thanks to Faryaab for the tip!]

Samsung Launcher

With the Galaxy S III firmware leak, it was expected to see some of it ported to other devices. It began with the porting and removal of S-Voice, only to see its triumphant return. With the trouble that has brought, perhaps its time to check out a less dramatic, but still totally awesome port. Samsung Galaxy S II I9100 owners now have access to the Galaxy S III TouchWiz launcher.

XDA Forum Member Smando has brought the SGS3 TouchWiz Launcher port to the Galaxy S II. The launcher looks really nice and is pretty slick. Unfortunately, it only works on Samsung based ROMs, so those running AOSP can’t taste the Galaxy S III goodness just yet.

The launcher comes in a recovery-flashable update.zip, so installing is a breeze. Users then have two options: They can either choose the stock launcher with a 4×5 layout—4 columns and 5 rows—or a modified one that’s 5×5. The release has already received some updates to get some things fixed such as the layout of the widgets page. However, users will still get force closes on some 4×4 widgets, so it’s not perfect quite yet. This is still a great way for Galaxy S II users to check out the Galaxy S III’s software goodness.

For additional information and downloads, hit up the original thread.

EZRecovery Switcher

For many devices, getting a custom recovery installed can be tricky business. Sometimes you have to flash it in the bootloader, other times you have to flash it over ODIN, and other times yet you download a recovery-flashable update.zip. While none of these are inherently difficult, it would be nice to have an easier way. Thankfully T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S II owners now have an app to make recovery switching easy.

Easy Recovery Switcher by XDA Recognized Developer starskyrob is actually as easy to use as the name implies. Users are given two options. The first is a Windows application that accomplishes the task via a USB connection, and the second is an Android application that does it right from your phone. The Windows application is what you’d expect from a one-click tool, but the Android app—which is still in beta testing right now—is actually pretty cool. Users have an option between TWRP, ClockworkMod and Touch-Enabled ClockworkMod. Users only have to select which version they want to have installed. It doesn’t get much easier than that. It should be noted, though, that backups may not be compatible across the various recoveries—so when you switch, don’t forget to recreate your Nandroid.

For downloads and instructions, head on over to the application thread.

Capture

In today’s Quick Take of This Week in Development, Jordan covers all the noteworthy articles from the XDA Portal. As Jordan discusses, the most important articles were about the Samsung Galaxy S III. This weekend the Galaxy S III was rooted, official stock firmware was leaked, Samsung S Voice was ripped, and the first custom ROM was released. In related news, the older Samsung Galaxy S II and Note have a serious bug that could brick your device.

Jordan then talks about CM9 Alpha arriving for the Droid X2. Finally, Jordan mentions our new Pro Tip series on XDA TV. All said, this is another video you don’t want to miss!

READ ON »

S Voice

It’s almost assumed that when the stock firmware is released for a highly anticipated device, developers will jump through hoops to make it work for their devices. As is the case with the Samsung Galaxy S III firmware, which was leaked yesterday. Developers have been getting their hands on it to give the users of their phone some SGS III love. Of course, it is assumed that the first thing to start making its rounds around the forum would be Samsung’s S Voice.

Originally posted for the International Galaxy Note by XDA Senior Member Zanr Zij, which showed that S Voice worked on the Note and probably many other Samsung Galaxy S devices, the S Voice has begun slowly making its way from device to device as users figure out whether or not it works for them.

Fortunately, XDA Senior Member dolcedavinci was brave enough to give it a shot and found out that the proprietary Samsung app actually does work on the HTC One S. And of course, this means that it doesn’t require any Samusng-specific framework and will likely work on many, many other devices as well. Installation is simple, just install the apk and give it a whirl.

For additional information, check out the Galaxy Note thread where you’ll find the download link to the apk for S Voice. You can also check out the One S thread to see it working for the HTC phone. Since you can just install the app like any other apk, and thus uninstall it easily, there’s no risk in trying this for yourself on your own device!

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa

  • Nexus 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Galaxy Note 3 (T-Mobile) buy | sell
  • HTC One M7 (Verizon) buy | sell
  • Galaxy S 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Nexus 7 2013 buy | sell
  • Swappa is the official marketplace of XDA