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Posts Tagged: Samsung Galaxy S

618px-Over_9000_Vector_by_Vernacular

Heimdall Suite, an Open-Source Cross-Platform set of tools designed to flash firmware to Samsung devices, has received an incremental update to version 1.3.2. This latest update supports Galaxy S II GT-I9100, Galaxy PlayerCaptivate, Vibrant, Fascinate, Mesmerize, Epic 4G, Galaxy S 4G, Infuse 4G, GT-I9000T, Galaxy Tab (7 and 10.1 inches) and of course the Galaxy S GT-i9000.  If your Samsung device is not listed here, testing is required.

Heimdall has always been a favorite among kernel developers and those who frequently flash the latest kernels because no flashable update.zip or Odin packaging is required.   A Heimdall user can simply put their device into Download Mode, and click a button to flash a new zImage directly. XDA Recognized Developer Benjamin Dobell‘s  latest release improves compatibility with Loke (the flash receiver on the device) and expands comparability to several new devices.

In the words of the developer:

Version 1.3.2 addresses some compatibility issues with several devices i.e. the Galaxy Player 5.0 and Galaxy S II. In particular the “Failed to confirm end of file transfer sequence!” error should no longer occur under regular use. This was fixed by mapping a previously unknown protocol parameter, which I’ve now called “chip identifier”, to information in a device’s PIT file. A big thanks goes out to XDA developers user ambrice, who helped identify the cause of the issue.

Head on over to the original thread , get the source code , and check out the official product page.

 

CM logo

While a pretty sizeable number of devices have already been graced with nightly versions of CM9, that list just keeps on getting bigger. It seems that at some point yesterday the first nightly builds for the original Samsung Galaxy S (i9000 & i9000b) made an appearance on the CM download page.

I suspect that these nightly builds will be much sought after by a great deal of Galaxy S users. Although a semi-functional alpha version for the i9000 has been available for a while, it really was just that. There were a great deal of rather major issues still unresolved and these alpha builds hadn’t seen an update since November last year. This is also the first time that we’ve seen a version of CM9 for the i9000b.

Galaxy S users will surely be hoping that the appearance of these two new builds signals the start of regular nightly builds with much increased functionality. Unfortunately it’s a little difficult to tell which of these outstanding issues has been fixed in the new versions as there are currently no official statements on these two new builds as of yet from either the CM site or their Google+ profile.

If you are the owner of either an i9000 or the regional variant the i9000b and can’t wait to get your hands on these before a changelog appears then you can find these new nightly’s here on the CM download page.

[Thanks to duanh for the tip!]

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TMobile Galaxy S II

It’s always exciting when the development of one devices causes positive change in the development of a different device. Sometimes rooting a device means getting new software to older phones, as is the case with the Sony Xperia Line Up, and it’ll happen with even more phones in the future.

This is now happening for the T-Mobile Samsung Galaxy S II. XDA Forum Member johnrbell has just announced that the Galaxy Blaze has been rooted. While the Blaze isn’t the most popular phone out there, there will be some users happy to hear that and awaiting the method to be made public for future use.

However, the meat and potatoes of rooting the Galaxy Blaze, for most users anyway, is the radio. XDA Recognized Developer Master&Slave™ has pulled and posted the radio from the Galaxy Blaze, which has been a long awaited development for T-Mobile Galaxy S II owners. In his words:

-My Data has increased by about 4Mbps, which is a + in my case
-Dont ask me for screenshots
-Tested after removing my build.prop and init.d data tweaks for true results.
-Speeds will vary depending on your location.

Users looking to get a new modem on their already rocking SGS2 can head on over to Master&Slave™’s modem thread for the downloads and discussions about the modem. Currently, the modem is being tested without ROM tweaks to see the true benefits, but with a 4 Mbit increase in speed, results look promising. Before flashing, be sure that you have a real T-Mo SGS2 modem handy in case something goes wrong that you can revert to.

icecream

It seems that Samsung has made quite a stir recently thanks to several recently released updates and firmware leaks (albeit they are mostly coming from carriers) to most of their lineup, going back all the way to the original Galaxy S. Thanks to the efforts of XDA Forum Member Przekret and Recognized Developer Faryaab, we now have access to the very latest firmware that was released by Samsung for the original Samsung Galaxy S. The new firmware comes loaded with a ton of updates, bug fixes, a new kernel, a new radio, and most importantly, it will update your device to 2.3.6 (officially anyways).

To make this even more juicy, Faryaab has provided, in his own thread, a method to root this firmware before you even load it up by means of the legendary CF-Root Kernel, developed by XDA Recognized Developer Chainfire. This process requires you to place your device in download mode and by means of Odin to flash the root kernel .tar to the device. It is a quick, simple process that will yield you lots of happiness.

While writing this article in order to provide you with this interesting update from Samsung, I started thinking a little bit about how you will find projects like this or like this on XDA. Now, it is not something new that developers here can and normally will be able to release an update faster than most manufacturers. After all, xda-developers has been doing this for quite some time, keeping your devices alive and up to date, regardless of what your carrier or manufacturer tells you regarding the ability to  upgrade. The way I see this release by Samsung is that they are simply trying to release something new to keep the owners of this device mildly happy and content, keeping the complaints at bay. However, I just think that the technique that they are using to do this is not only wrong (both conceptually and the implementation), it is a waste of everyone’s time (including their own developers and engineers).

If you were to examine this new firmware, as stated earlier, it is a Gingerbread ROM on 2.3.6 and it is loaded with the following goodies:

  • Face Unlock (ICS)
  • Galaxy S II ICS Lockscreen (ICS)
  • Photo Editor (ICS)
  • Built-in TouchWiz 4 (normally loaded on ICS ROMs)

Essentially, in case you have not noticed by now, they are releasing an ICS sprinkled GB ROM to try and keep the people from complaining about the lack of ICS on the device. I mean, after all, most of the eye candy, appealing features of the newer OS are there right? Unlocking your device by just looking at it, a cooler lockscreen than TouchWiz’s stock, smoother and faster transitions, and more. Your average Joe will likely be content with such an “upgrade” because they now have all that they need for their device to look “kewl;” but in terms of functionality, it is the exact same as before–=minus bug fixes and a few tweaks and improvements, of course.

Do you not think that it would have taken the same amount of time (maybe even less considering Samsung’s vast resources in terms of workforce as well as source code, drivers, etc) to make an ICS build for this as opposed to porting applications to an older OS? Hey, I have an idea! Android is Open Source, right? What if they simply used preexisting firmware such as the two ROMs referenced above, fixed the missing pieces in the kernels and libraries, and released a full ICS update? As long as proper credits are provided, they could easily use the existing ports as a base, and go from there (assuming that they don’t feel like starting the ports from scratch).

If Samsung (and other OEMs) would get out of the corporate mentality for a second, they would understood that one of the main reasons people are flocking to Android devices and Open Source software is because collaborative efforts tend to yield MUCH better results in shorter periods of time. Unlike what they would probably do to developers, we are unlikely to send you C&D letters from using and modifying code generated by our developers. Why? Because we believe in the spirit of Open Source and sharing. We are all working towards a common goal, which is to improve the technology that we normally use.

I know that they will likely say that it is the carriers who prevent them from releasing updates, as it hurts sales to update an older device to the latest OS—something that becomes a major selling point for any electronic device. But if you just wrapped up all the goodies from the next OS into an approved update, do you honestly believe that the customer will even bother into looking for a replacement device with an OS that offers, in his or her eyes anyways, the same “kewl” stuff that is present in the newer ones? If you do, then congratulations as you are successfully shooting yourself in the foot twice with the same gun because: A) You will likely piss off tech savvy people who will see through this lame attempt at preventing complaints (and hence, losing part of your customer base); and B) because you will likely ensure that the not-so savvy customer is happy enough with their current device so that they will not buy another one for a while. And in the process of accomplishing the latter, you just spent tons of money on R&D and engineers porting apps from an OS that is Open Source and has already been ported to the target device(s).

To sum things up, Samsung, HTC, et al…. We are here to try and make the best out of these devices. Help us help you. In the name of the spirit of Open Source, lets try and work together so that you make better decisions than trying to calm the public with frankenbuilds like this, which are quite frankly, a waste of everyone’s time.

You can find the original firmware thread here and Faryaab’s thread with the rooting instructions here.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks Faryaab for the tip!]

samsung galaxy s

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again. Developer collaborations rock. In addition to pooling together resources, collaborative development allows for multiple sets of eyes to look over any given problem. This is especially true when the problem being fixed is one is as annoying as the Low Memory Notifications on the Original Samsung Galaxy S running CyanogenMod. For those who don’t know what it is, XDA Forum Member naTrium explains:

Lot’s of people have encountered the problem where their /datadata partition fills up and then apps begin force closing. This is often confusing since there is usually a lot of space available on the internal 2GB storage partition. But these are two different partitions on cyanogenmod. The created the datadata partition on the fast internal memory so that apps would start up and run faster (i.e. less lag), but it is only about 170MB (which can’t be helped).

So, what is a CyanogenMod-toting Galaxy S to do? XDA Senior Member revthanki began to solve the problem with his script that sent the most commonly used portions of the application to the smaller, faster partition. It would then move the bulky, less used portions to the larger 2GB partition outside.

While it worked, the process revthanki created was difficult to implement. However, naTrium, with some help from CyanogenMod Team member drafnel, cleaned it up a little bit and packaged it in a convenient flashable update.zip. The script works pretty much the same, except it becomes automated on boot and and does a few other nice things such as cleaning up databases left by uninstalled applications.

For additional information on the flashable zip, head on over to the modification thread. There, you can get the basics on everything the script will do to remove those low memory notifications for good.

captivate-nexusS-galaxyS

With the recent news that the Samsung Galaxy Note i717 could be hacked to work on T-Mobile’s HSPA+ network, many inquisitive and adventurous users on XDA began to wonder if other devices could benefit as well. XDA Forum Member pwneman looked into what other Samsung devices had compatible radios and found that the Nexus S i9020a for AT&T uses its radio hardware much the same way as the Samsung Galaxy S i9000, and to a limited extent, the Samsung Captivate. Flashing the devices with the Nexus S radio image not only worked, but seemed to yield noticeable benefits (at least on the i9000).

So I found out that the Nexus S radios are indeed compatible with our device. I downloaded some of the hot radios for the Nexus S (KB3 and KF1) and opened them up and found that the Nexus S uses radios (similar to how the captivate/galaxy s uses modems). So I just renamed the radio.img from the Nexus S radios to modem.bin, placed it in an existing cm7 modem package and flashed it via CWM (ICS).

I reboot and get a constant 5 bars of signal. My signal hasn’t dropped from this 5 bars of signal in the last 10 hours (usually it fluctuates from 5 to 3 bars). HSDPA speeds are pretty fast as well. I got speeds of 560 kb/s DL at 3 bars of signal and 140 kb/s Upload. I’ve never ever gotten that high speeds.

If you fancy giving this a shot, and have taken all the necessary precautions like donning your own designer tin-foil hat, proceed to the Galaxy S thread to get started. You can also give it a try on the Captivate, however there have been reports that the 850 MHz band may not work after flashing and that connectivity may be a bit sporadic.

Samsung Galaxy S

Getting new software on older phones is always cause for joy. Usually, the big prize is reserved for getting a whole new version of Android—such as Ice Cream Sandwich. However, sometimes little mods from new software can be fun as well. XDA Forum Member PaWill has successfully ported the TouchWiz 4 launcher for Samsung Galaxy S I9000 users who are running select iterations of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

The mod is installed relatively easily thanks to a recovery-flashable update.zip. There may be bugs, so if you happen to find any, please report them so they fixed. The current change log states:

Repaired scrolling wallpaper.
Works:
SGS CM9 Build 16
SGS Onecosmic 4.2
Nexus S AOKP b27

So if you’re running any of those ICS builds, then the update.zip should work properly for you. However, it could potentially work for almost any ICS ROM. As usual, be sure to make a backup before flashing just in case anything goes wrong.

Visit the original thread for screen shots, download links, and discussion.

ICSi9000

All good things must come to an end, and that is life. However, we at XDA-Developers do our absolute best that our expensive devices do not fall under this category. We continuously strive to prolong and extend the shelf life of phones by adding features, apps, themes, and most importantly, by reverse engineering the daylights out of them so that they can run newer OSes unsupported by the manufacturers. Having said this, if you have an original Galaxy S (i9000), then today is your lucky day because XDA Forum Member dhiru1602 has successfully ported ICS onto this forgotten beast.

The port itself was taken directly from another port meant for the Nexus S 4G and it is currently in pre-alpha state, which means that you will likely not be rocking most features right off the bat. In fact, it probably means that at this point it is a pretty device to play with but not to use on a daily basis. Essentially, the device has no data capabilities at this point, which is likely the biggest thing, as well as no camera, or video playback. Having said that, for a pre-alpha state, this does have several things working which you would normally not see on similar level releases such as being able to make calls and send SMS, HW acceleration, BT, and a few other pluses.

If you do decide to go with this, please ensure that you understand that this is a work in progress and any and all feedback should be communicated to the dev so as to make this into a more functional port.

This is a full ROM Port based on Official Samsung Galaxy S II ICS ROM – XXLPH. It is based on swamp goblin’s port for Nexus S 4G! Thanks to him!

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks Faryaab for the tip!]

Samsung-Galaxy-SL-i9003-official

Those following the modding community will know that many modifications involve tweaking the build.prop file. Changing its contents can alter your device ID and give you access to market apps you normally wouldn’t have. Furthermore, it can increase your RAM usage, battery life and even make your data speeds go up a little bit.

XDA Senior Member TheFrankenstain has released a number of build.prop tweaks for the Samsung Galaxy SL i9003 for anyone who wants them—be it a developer who wants to add to their ROM, or a user wanting to tweak his or her system just a little bit more. To apply the tweaks, simply use your favorite root file explorer, find the build.prop file, and edit it. After that is accomplished, save and reboot the device. Be sure to make a backup of the original build.prop file, just in case something goes wrong.

It should be noted that build.prop tweaks are not entirely device specific. Some of these tweaks may work with other phones as well. While it would be prudent to make backups before attempting, feel free to give these a try on any device. The worst case scenario is you’d just have to restore your backup if anything goes wrong.

For those still rocking the Galaxy SL who want to do some homespun tweaking, you can check out the original thread for all the tweaks listed. Additionally, some users have added tweaks in the replies, so be sure to browse around and see all there is to see.

Unlock Program

Getting SIM unlock can be a pain and usually requires some wacky progress using hex editors, or paying a carrier or third party to give you the code. Since paying money for something you can get free is never preferable, and a lot of people don’t even know how to properly wield a hex editor, there will always be a use for tools that do it for you.

XDA Senior Member Grooby has put together a nifty Windows application that will run the otherwise difficult method originally created by XDA Recognized Developer Odia for people who are having trouble with it. You can find the original method in its development thread. The application works only for older models of the Samsung Galaxy S II I9100, as some users report the method not working with hardware versions 1.4 or beyond. The older version of the tool will work for users carrying a Samsung Galaxy S I9000.

Development for the tool is moving forward as the tool creators are attempting to make it compatible with later hardware versions of the Samsung Galaxy S II, so if it doesn’t work for you, keep an eye out in case a fix is finally found. If you happen to have the supported hardware, you can find the download links for both the old hardware Samsung Galaxy S II and the tool for the Samsung Galaxy S along with instructions in the original thread.

Touch Recovery

Choosing your recovery is a big deal. For most people, they’re luck enough to get at least one good one and it’s usually ClockworkMod Recovery. On other devices, though, users can have two, three up to half a dozen choices for their recoveries. For some select devices, they now even have the option for a touch recovery or a recovery you can use sans the hardware keys.

XDA Recognized Developer DooMLoRD and XDA Senior Member Napster or Team UtterChaos have been working hard to get their special blend of touch screen recovery out to as many phones as possible.

Currently, those carrying the Samsung Galaxy SL, the Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc, the Sony Ericsson Xperia Play and the Huawei Ideos 6 can be a part of the touch recovery action.

The recovery features a very appealing tiled interface with some nice theming and all the features you’d expect out of a recovery. Additionally, you can use the hardware buttons if you’d like, you can tap directly on options or you can use touch buttons to navigate your way around the interface, giving users pretty much every possible usability option there is. Have we mentioned it looks really pretty? And with even more devices to come, there seems to be no end to the releases to keep your eyes peeled in the forums.

For those who have the Samsung Galaxy SL who want to give it a shot, you can check out the Galaxy SL thread, Xperia Play users can head on over to the Play thread, Xperia Arc users can hit up the Arc thread and for those toting the Huawei Ideos 6, you can find your version in the Ideos Thread. All threads contain additional info, download links and a video with a really nice soundtrack showing you how it works.

Samsung Galaxy S i9000

One of the most fun things about flashing a custom ROM is finding out about all the add ons that developers sometimes leave out of the change log. A new font, a themed keyboard, having the Facebook widget match the theme (for once). However, flashing mods and tweaks can be a pain in the behind.

Enter BroodROM Configurator. XDA Senior Member broodplank1337 has devised this nifty tool to allow users of the Samsung Galaxy S i9000 to choose their features on a ROM and installing them without needing Terminal Emulator or flashing via recovery.

The Configurator has a plethora of features, including:

Choose GPU Driver
Enable/Disable Media scanning
Choose boot animation (RC 1/2) or choose a custom one
Install extended status bar (scrollable, 14 buttons)
Install extra languages (locale app, arabian)
Choose boot sound (standard, feacore, none) or choose a custom one
Choose a GPS Server (14 Servers available)
Choose a DNS Server (5 Servers available)
Choose a APN List (Default, Cyanogenmod APN List)
Enable, Update or Disable AdBlocker (hosts file)
Wipe selected partition
Calibrate battery, Install battery tweak, Battery hints
Recover from bootloop
Turn phone off, reboot phone, reboot in recovery, reboot in download

You can also do things like pick your scheduler or even your kernel and works on XXKPS, XXKPU & XXKQ1 ROMs, even though it’s designed for specifically for BroodROM. After running the Configurator, you’re ready to go with your new set up.

If this is something you could see yourself using, you can check out the original thread for additional details, full features list and even a nifty instructional video. As usual, make a back up first, just in case something doesn’t flash right.

Samsung Galaxy S 4g

While no single modification or tweak can permanently solve all the problems a phone has, there are, in fact, a great number of modifications to tackle the most annoying things. Things such as short battery life, lag and the fact your HTC Evo 4g didn’t build you that promised island and fly you there. For the record, none of the mods to do the latter have ever worked.

However, for those carrying the Samsung Galaxy S 4g, there is something out there to help fix issues like battery life and increasing responsiveness. XDA Recognized Developer dsexton702 has made a tweak package that will do those things and more.

The features are plentiful and include:

What do these tweaks do?
improves battery life
Greatly improve the smoothness of your phone especially with scrolling
increase your phones repsonsiveness
for some it increases FPS and allows better gaming
Improves the HTC’s Evo 3d, 3d quality
improves better I/O performance
speed up start up time
handles multitasking better
improves ext4 partition mounts
improves better cpu performance
least importantly it improves quad score

To install, all a user needs to do is wipe cache/dalvik in recovery, mount system and flash via ClockworkMod recovery. It doesn’t get anymore basic than that.

If you’d like to apply is awesome set of tweaks to your device, head on over to the original thread for download links, instructions and further information. As per the norm, don’t forget to make a backup before flashing, just in case!

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