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Posts Tagged: Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1

galaxy-tab-10

Not too long ago, we brought you news on how to turn your Nexus 7 into a functional phone. While using a tablet as a phone isn’t the most ergonomic solution for phone calls, some may value having another nearby device capable of making calls. Now, the same has been accomplished on the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1.

There are several installation methods to choose from, each one based on a different ROM. This will work on any Galaxy Tab 10.1 running the newest stock ICS ROM and derivatives, CyanogenMod9, or CyanogenMod 10. From there, it’s a matter of downloading the appropriate files and flashing them in recovery. The method was released by XDA Senior Member almaqdad. So far, the only issues being reported is that sometimes you have to drop to 2G to get the calls to work properly.

There are some restrictions, though. This mod is intended only for users who own the 3G version of the Galaxy Tab 10.1—namely, the GT-P7500 version. So those who don’t have this particular version can’t take advantage of this mod for the time being. If you’d like to know more, check out the original thread.

[Thanks to XDA Senior Member Toldo for the tip!]

Samsung Galaxy Tab Battery Issues

Many Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and 10.1 users who have flashed custom ICS ROMs report problems with battery drain. Some cases have been so bad that the battery has been draining from 100% down to 0% within just two to three hours.

Many users were speculating problems in the ROM or kernel with high CPU usage causing the drain, but it has been found out to be an issue with the battery calibration. Luckily, this can be fixed by calibrating the battery again. Keep in mind that re-calibration will require some patience on your part, as it will involve letting the battery drain, sit idle, charge and sit idle again for fixed time intervals, and this timing is important.

The method for the Galaxy Tab 10.1 comes from XDA Senior Member Vlad_z, and can be found in the original thread. The Galaxy Tab 8.9 guide thread is based on the method used in the previous thread, and is brought to us by XDA Senior Member pseudoheld.

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JB

Two weeks ago, Jelly Bean source code was released. Since then, it’s been a frenzy on XDA as developers have worked hard to get the newest version of the OS ported to their devices. In that time, over two dozen devices have received Jelly Bean to some extent, and many more are bound to follow. The Samsung Galaxy Tab 8.9 and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 are among the latest to get Jelly Bean. However, unlike many devices, the Galaxy Tab 8.9 and 10.1 actually have two Jelly Bean ports. One is pure AOSP and the other is CyanogenMod 10.

Despite some early release jitters, all four ROMs actually work quite well. XDA Senior Member safariking posted the pure AOSP build, while XDA Senior Member kallt_kaffe posted the CyanogenMod 10 for the Galaxy Tab 8.9. XDA Senior Member MapleSyrup posted both Jelly Bean ROMs for the Galaxy Tab 10.1. Also, all four ROMs have had heavy developmental help from XDA Recognized Developer pershoot.

For the Galaxy Tab 8.9, there isn’t a running list of what’s working on the CyanogenMo10 port, aside from how 3G works. That said, it is listed as preview, so users should expect bugs here and there. The pure AOSP ROM seems to be more stable, as the only things reported not working are the camera and Google Now. Of course, so early in the development, there could likely be more broken features that have not yet been discovered. For the Galaxy Tab 10.1, the CyanogenMod 10 port seems almost stable, with the only thing listed as not working being the camera. The AOSP build seems a little more rough as 3G, 4G, and AGPS are listed as not working for some models.

All in all, these ROMs are quite usable, but users should note that these builds are far from complete. For download links, additional details, and more, check out the corresponding links below.

Capture3

In today’s episode of XDA TV, XDA Forum Moderator and Recognized Developer shenye teaches us how to root the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. Shen begins by unboxing the Galaxy Tab 10.1, and showing us all of the wonderful items that come out of the box. He then takes us through the process of getting the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 rooted using tools from the XDA Developers Forums.

READ ON »

Galaxy Tab101

With the unofficial release of ICS ROMs on tablets, end users have been treated to some Ice Cream Sandwich goodness much sooner than would be delivered by their tablet OEMs. These ROMs allow us to experience ICS on a larger screen and see if it really is the hybrid tablet/phone OS that Google says it is before we would otherwise be able. So far, so good for most users, but as tablet are still a relatively uncharted territory when compared to phones, there is always even room for even more development.

This is why there are a plethora of mods and tweaks. Thanks to XDA Senior Member tommrazek01, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 now has a collection of previously created user interface mods that help the overall experience feel more complete. The tweaks come in the form of a recovery-flashable update.zip and it offers improvements such as:

Beats Audio (Yes, the real beats audio. There is no icon, but when you listen to music, you will see the huge ()difference. I don’t take credit for this, it is thanks to a Galaxy S Port.) New Wallpapers By Asus Trebuchet! The CM Launcher now availiable for AOSP! (Just remove the /system/app folder if you do not need i) Some performance tweaks (No benchmarks just yet.) Smooth Scrolling

So it’s a variety pack, adding a little bit to just about everything from the CM9 launcher to new wallpapers and Beats Audio. As always, don’t forget to make a backup first, and be sure to follow all the instructions accordingly. To get started, hit up the original thread.

618px-Over_9000_Vector_by_Vernacular

Heimdall Suite, an Open-Source Cross-Platform set of tools designed to flash firmware to Samsung devices, has received an incremental update to version 1.3.2. This latest update supports Galaxy S II GT-I9100, Galaxy PlayerCaptivate, Vibrant, Fascinate, Mesmerize, Epic 4G, Galaxy S 4G, Infuse 4G, GT-I9000T, Galaxy Tab (7 and 10.1 inches) and of course the Galaxy S GT-i9000.  If your Samsung device is not listed here, testing is required.

Heimdall has always been a favorite among kernel developers and those who frequently flash the latest kernels because no flashable update.zip or Odin packaging is required.   A Heimdall user can simply put their device into Download Mode, and click a button to flash a new zImage directly. XDA Recognized Developer Benjamin Dobell‘s  latest release improves compatibility with Loke (the flash receiver on the device) and expands comparability to several new devices.

In the words of the developer:

Version 1.3.2 addresses some compatibility issues with several devices i.e. the Galaxy Player 5.0 and Galaxy S II. In particular the “Failed to confirm end of file transfer sequence!” error should no longer occur under regular use. This was fixed by mapping a previously unknown protocol parameter, which I’ve now called “chip identifier”, to information in a device’s PIT file. A big thanks goes out to XDA developers user ambrice, who helped identify the cause of the issue.

Head on over to the original thread , get the source code , and check out the official product page.

 

MetroUI

Starting with Windows Phone 7 and continuing with Windows 8, Microsoft’s Metro UI has made a strong splash in the tech community. While there are some who don’t care for the Redmond flair, many users feel that Metro UI is fun and aesthetically appealing. Unfortunately for users of other mobile OSes, Metro UI was originally intended for use only on Windows devices.

However, that has never stopped industrious Android developers in the past. Now those carrying the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 can get some Metro UI-themed goodness as well. XDA Senior Member BroBot175 has released an extensive theme to simulate the Metro experience. The application and theme is flashable via ClockworkMod recovery. Once it’s installed, the application will change your home screens to a Metro UI-like interface and theme your status bar to match. Currently, the modification is in beta testing, so there are some bugs that still need to be worked out. The number of widgets is also still growing, so by no means is this a final release. Users who enjoy it should keep up with the development as it unfolds.

For additional information, screen shots, download links and more, check out the modification thread. As usual, make a backup before flashing so you can restore in case you don’t like it or in case something goes awry.

GalaxyTabRootZip

The most exciting root is almost always the first root. Getting s-off, freeing your phone for the first time and sticking it to the proverbial man is exciting. However, that doesn’t depreciate the effort to keep that root method updated and making it an easier, more stable method.

XDA Senior Member S0ckM0nk3y of the Android Creative Syndicate has taken the prior root method for the, updated it and written up an easy to follow, detailed tutorial for those who don’t know what they’re doing.

It should be noted that the method is intended specifically for the United States WiFi version of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. So if that’s not what you’re packing, do not use this method as it could damage your device.

The method not only features and updated root method, but also an updated unroot method for those who need to get that Tab back to legit for whatever reason they need it that way. It also includes downloads and tools in case the user doesn’t have them.

For those who’s U.S. Galaxy Tab 10.1 WiFi people who could use an updated root method, you can find the download links, full tutorial for both root and unroot methods and even a full video tutorial in the original thread.

galaxy tab 10

For most Android devices, one of the most well known tactics for fixing a phone is the all important battery pull. It gets you out of device freezes, infinite boot loops and just about any other problem that you can’t fix using buttons. From there, it’s as easy as getting into the bootloader or the recovery and flashing something that fixes your device or restoring it to stock.

For some devices, battery pulls just aren’t an option. An example of this is the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. The Tab, along with other devices, don’t have an opening battery door, so there’s no way to get to the battery. No way to get to the battery equals no pulling the battery when something goes wrong. So, what are they supposed to do?

XDA Senior Member Misledz answers that question with a tutorial on getting your Galaxy Tab 10.1 restored if you end up getting into a situation that would normally warrant a battery pull. The process is relatively simple, but it requires a lot of patience as the tutorial calls for you killing your battery before you can begin the process. Basically, you kill the battery and plug it in and when the battery icon appears, you simply press the power and volume down keys to boot into fastboot, then into download mode where users can Odin their way back to having a working device.

For the complete instructions, you can find everything you need in the original thread.

gtab el01

As pointed out by forum member mineshrai, Verizon is preparing an update to its LTE version of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1. The EL01 update will apparently add TouchWiz to the Honeycomb tablet. The most notable feature seems to be a mini app tray that holds six apps and can be accessed from anywhere.

On Verizon’s support page, the update is said to be coming soon, with no specific date given. Note that this is not the Ice Cream Sandwich update, which Samsung has promised for Q1 and beyond.

Head over to the forum thread to join the discussion.

GOOGLE-ICE-CREAM-SANDWICH-LOGO-GOOGLE-IO

Samsung has officially announced its roadmap for Ice Cream Sandwich updates: the bestselling Galaxy S II and ubersized Galaxy Note will be the first devices to get their Android version bumped to 4.0, beginning in the first quarter of 2012, while the Galaxy S II LTE, Galaxy R (a Tegra 2 version of the S II, only available in Taiwan), and various Galaxy Tabs (10.1, 8.9, 7.7, 7.0 Plus) will get their Ice Cream Sandwich treatment later, at unspecified dates that are going to be announced seperately “according to market situation and carriers’ requirements”. Same goes, we presume, for the carrier-branded versions of the Galaxy S II.

cyanogen-logo

Cyanogen has been hard at work to bring you the perfect customisation of the latest Android iteration, Ice Cream Sandwich. Almost a month ago the team announced their two month hardcore-development period to put the basic framework in place for ICS to work. They’re succeeding mainly with OMAP4, MSM8660/7×30 and Exynos-based handsets, so if you own those look forward to trying CM9 first. Support has also been boasted for the Galaxy Tab 10.1 and ASUS Transformer.

Despite issues developing the new Android framework for camera and graphics drivers, the team is confident they can work around this.

“There are a number of challenges that we are up against. Google has made some pretty major changes to the Android framework that break compatibility with older proprietary camera and graphics drivers in order to achieve some pretty insane performance, but I am confident that the team will be able to overcome these issues like we have in the past.”

If you’re unlucky enough to own the original Motorola Droid, Cyanogen says they’re “dropping support for you. Time to upgrade.” I’m lucky enough to own devices Cyanogen is developing CM9 for first, so when Beta builds are released, I’ll be able to showcase them. I’m looking forward to seeing how CM9 runs on the ASUS Transformer.

Via: Engadget
Source: Cyanogen

tweet

As it is always the case in the world of technology, early adopters of most devices and brands are usually among the first to start complaining about things. This is particularly true when it comes to updates to their investments. However, most of these complaints are well founded due to them being about things that end up resulting in poor performance and overall bugginess. A very specific case for this is the Galaxy Tab 10.1v, which is the European version of the acclaimed Galaxy Tab, running under Vodaphone. As it is customary with updates, carrier and manufacturer pointed fingers at each other when people complained about not getting updates to take the tab from 3.0.1 to anything that wasn’t remotely as buggy as that. Looks like Samsung got tired of the little dance with the carriers, so they announced via their Tweeter account that the 10.1v would get the update and it was up to Vodaphone to say when they would roll out. XDA member fanSte posted about it in a thread and has posted screenshots of the Tweets as well.

As an early adopter of Honeycomb myself (my Asus came loaded with 3.0.1), I cannot understand why these customers were left with such buggy tabs. I do understand that networks have their own sets of restrictions when it comes to OTAs and that their networks may not be able to handle a massive push of updates, but this update was badly needed. So, while I don’t own a Galaxy tab, I thank you (Samsung and Voda) on the owner’s behalf.

e ng Galaxy Tab 10.1v is deliverd with 3.01 and there will be an upgrade to Android 3.1 Honeycomb. 

You can find more information in the original thread.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

Thanks bergoulle for the tip!

 

 

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