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Posts Tagged: Samsung Galaxy

samgalaxynx

samgalaxynxPicking out a mid- to high-end camera is a bit like picking a phone. Once you’ve made your decision and plunked down the large investment, you’ve got a lot of work ahead of you in order to make it your own. A good camera can be accessorized and tailored to your needs, and the Galaxy NX is no exception. While many people prefer a high end “dumb camera,” yours truly is content with nothing less than Android Power.

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20121229_121732

Android devices support a lot of external devices. From Bluetooth speakers to external hard drives, there really isn’t much you can’t hook up to an Android device anymore. However, one thing that users may have trouble with is an external microphone.

XDA Elite Recognized Developers AdamOutler and Rebellos are at it again. This time with a hardware mod that will allow better external mic support on most Samsung Galaxy devices. This includes the Galaxy Note II and the Galaxy Camera. AdamOutler explains the mod in more detail:

Elite Recognized Developer Rebellos searched the code, and we figured out that the device wouldn’t recognize my mic because its Ohms are too low. The WolfsonMicro chip uses any value below 1000 Ohms to signify button presses. Above 1000 Ohms, it signifies a microphone. My microphone is a 900 Ohm microphone, so in all actuality, it’s pretty high considering most are around 100-500 Ohms. However, Rebellos and I managed to hack through it. I wanted to share this method.

The result is a hardware mod that allows the use of larger external microphones. There are a few things to note. As Adam stated, in order to be detected, the mic must offer 1000 Ohms of resistance. If it doesn’t, then the device won’t register it as a microphone, but rather, as a button press. Since most of us don’t want to buy an entirely new microphone, a tempting solution is to create an adapter to enable the one you already have to work on the device.

According to Adam, you’ll be building a, “Samsung 4-pole to 1/4″ Mic adapter with a 200 Ohm resistor inline.” The process itself isn’t overly difficult, and for frequent hardware modders, it should be a walk in the park. Since you’re not soldering anything onto your device, you most likely aren’t putting it in direct jeopardy. Just be careful not to burn yourself with that soldering iron.

If this looks like something worth trying, head over to the original thread.

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samsung-i5500-corby

It’s hardly a secret that here on XDA, we really love it when developers accomplish the impossible. Throughout the forums, this takes the shape of custom kernels that push the boundaries of performance and clocks, apps that accomplish previously unheard of tasks, and—perhaps most importantly—ROM updates for the devices of yesteryear.

Enter the Samsung Galaxy 5—a phone that even upon release, was never destined to be considered a flagship device. And now that this device is approaching two years of age, it seems as if first party support is all but extinct. Thankfully, developers such as XDA forum member subpsyke, have worked hard to keep the Galaxy 5 running modern builds of the platform.

Today, thanks to the hard work of XDA forum member myshu, we have an early Ice Cream Sandwich-flavored build of CyanogenMod 9. While the ROM isn’t quite ready to serve as your daily driver, it’s an excellent step in the right direction.

This is a port of Cyanogen 9 (based on Android 4.0.3 Ice Cream Sandwich) for the Samsung Galaxy 5 I5500 (Europa) phone. The current port status is unstable - NOT SUITABLE FOR DAILY USE.

Special Thanks to: psyke83, squadzone, dhalham, people that helped with hotfixes and rooting and ofcourse all of you for Testing 

Working:

  • Hardware Acceleration (Some Parts)
  • Touchscreen
  • WiFi

Broken:

  • Telephony
  • 3G
  • Audio
  • GPS
  • Sensors
  • Bluetooth
  • Market
  • USB Mounting
  • WiFi Hotspot
  • Tethering
  • JIT is Disabled (So, the ROM is slightly slow)
  • Keyboard (Doesn’t appear completely on the Screen)

If you’re interested in giving this a shot on your own Galaxy 5, continue on to the ROM thread. Just be sure to create a nandroid backup before doing so, as you’re going to need to revert in order to actually use your phone as a phone… or anything else, for that matter.

samsung_galaxy_s_4g

Using a hex editor to unlock a phone can be a very challenging task, especially if one does not have good knowledge of hex. More difficult still if it’s something that needs to be done on the fly.

Well, if you happen to own a Samsung Galaxy 4g, then the difficulty level has just dropped to nearly nothing.

XDA Senior Member FBis251 has written out a script, run through an existing app in the Android Market, that will get you those unlock codes without dealing with the angst of hex editing. The only prerequisite is that you need a functional T-Mobile simcard for the time being, although he’s working on a way to get it to users without one. It’s a relatively simple procedure:

1) Download the script file, save it on the SD card
2) Download Script Manager from the market
3) Open Script Manager and run the script from the SD card
4) When the dialog comes up asking you to run the script, tap on SU (it will turn green) and tap Run
5) Your unlock code will be shown on the screen and will be saved as unlock_code.txt on your sd card

That’s a very simple, free and non-headache inducing way of getting those unlock codes you’ve been looking for. If you want to check out the other features and some screenshot goodness, you can follow the link for the original thread.

razr_rezound_nexus

I was thinking about the HTC Rezound today.  I do that sometimes–sit down and let my thoughts wander. I thought about its three-way fight within Verizon against the Samsung Galaxy Nexus and Motorola Droid RAZR, and how it will fare this Christmas season.  I also thought about TrevE’s work on HTC’s astounding Carrier IQ screw-up. And I came up with a target market based on privacy and security to whom no manufacturer has managed to sell phones yet:  the hopeless-paranoid.

See, on one extreme, there’s the non-paranoid.  These people either think they have everything under control or don’t care if they have control.  They’re the ones who buy crappy phones on contract.  They have no interest in phones, it’s just something they use and could easily afford at the moment.

At the opposite extreme, there’s the empowered-paranoid.  These are developers and other early adopters who use independent development.  They constantly seek the best phones either because it shouldn’t have the flaws of crappier phones, or because, if it does have problems, they can do something about it and not feel like they’re wasting time developing for sub-par hardware.

If we imagine a square to give a two-dimensional range to my envisioned market, in another corner are the paranoid-curious.  These people don’t worry too much, but their brains pump out thoughts often enough that they can at least spare a few to consider the advice of developers and early adopters.  That means worrying about privacy and security to some degree.  They buy higher-end phones because the empowered-paranoid–who are, again, developers and early adopters–encourage it.

Then there’s the hopeless-paranoid.  These people have all the security and privacy concerns of developers, yet feel they have no way to correct it.  Which phones do they buy?  They don’t.  The only thing they know to do when they’re worried about their privacy is to avoid the thing that makes them worry.  They aren’t worried about specific security issues–they don’t actually know enough to worry like that.  They’re worried about everything.  They say things like, “I don’t want people to be able to call me no matter where I am.”   We’ve all heard lines like that, and we all know it’s silly.  If you don’t want to talk to people at a certain time, turn off your phone.  No, they’re worried about more than being so accessible.

Now, you may be asking, is there actually any reason to be paranoid?  I guess that depends.  I reread some of the articles egzthunder1 wrote covering all TrevE’s amazing work exposing the dirty little secrets of HTC and the carriers.  And while he focuses on HTC phones, make no mistake that other manufacturers are doing the same.

Nevermind the security flaws that allow any app with Internet access to intercept the data that Carrier IQ, HTCLogger, etc. collect.  HTC and the carriers collect enough data to know pretty much everything about your phone habits.  Verizon changed their privacy policy to say that while you can opt out of letting them sell your information to other companies, they’re still collecting and keeping that data.  And Sprint… Sprint doesn’t even let you opt out.  They’re giving away information about you to whomever they like.  That could be companies.  That could be law enforcement.  You don’t get to say who they give it to, you don’t get to say what information they give, and you don’t get to say that they cannot collect it.

So yes, I think paranoia is justified.  And thank goodness for all the developers that work so hard to strip Carrier IQ and their ilk from ROMs.  To a certain extent, thank goodness for the manufacturers and carriers that openly support development by not locking down devices.  To the carriers and manufacturers who try to keep us from developing their devices, let me introduce you to the above four target markets.  I suggest you change your minds.  To HTC specifically, we see how developer-friendly you’re trying to be, but we see your devotion to carriers like Verizon more.  You need to decide that Peter Chou lied and bootloaders will not be unlocked, or you need to stand up for yourselves.

There is a point to all this.  As I said, I was thinking about the HTC Rezound, announced last week.  And since it’s on Verizon, its bootloaders will probably be locked.  That’s a clear move to prevent development.  So do something for me:  pretend the bootloader can’t be unlocked through exploits.  We can’t get S-Off, we can’t get root, no custom bootloader, no custom kernels or custom ROMs.  To put it simply, developers can’t develop.  All that paranoia and nothing can be done about it.

Which of those four groups of people does that sound like?  That’s right.  The hopeless-paranoid.  The people who don’t buy phones.  Except, in this case, they don’t buy your phones.  The only difference is, developers influence the buying habits of that large group of paranoid-curious people. The HTC Rezound?  Great specs.  Too bad the bootloader won’t be unlocked.  And doubly too-bad, HTC, that you made the Rezound exclusively for Verizon, the US carrier certain to get the Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

Merry Christmas, HTC.  Perhaps you’ll remember us in your New Years resolutions.

galaxy3

Not too long ago, we brought you news that Samsung Galaxy 5 had received a CyanogenMod 7 port, effectively extending its life just a little further. Now, the closely related Galaxy 3 has received a MIUI port, care of some crafty work by XDA forum member jazux and the rest of the GreenMods team. While the device is marginally faster and more capable than the aforementioned Galaxy 5, it’s still quite a long way from being a high-end device.

Most of the device functions and OS highlights are operational, though the lockscreen and MIUI launcher are currently no-shows. In the words of the developers:

MIUI – Redefining android, on SG3

ok so if you already didnt know GreenMods are porting MIUI ROM to SG3! it will be based on android 2.3 and it will simply be awesome!!!

heres a list of what is done and who is porting/helping

DONE

-Theme is almost done [pauri]

-some apps [jazux]

NOT DONE

-launcher [akash.gpta and anonymous]

-lockscreen [no porters yet]

Continue on to the original thread to get a taste of MIUI on your Galaxy 3. As with any ROM installation, you would be wise to do a full Nandroid backup prior to beginning the installation.

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