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Posts Tagged: Samsung

Jordan 6

This week on the XDA Portal, we saw many important stories. To give a run down of these stories, XDA TV Producer Jordan returns with another episode of This Week in Development.

Jordan mentions the Apple versus HTC patent wars and court battles. In more big, rich companies versus other rich companies news, Jordan updates us on the Oracle versus Google trial. In more Google news, the limit on device deauthorization on Google Music is discussed. The lamentable actions by Motorola and the locking down of their devices is mentioned. Finally, Jordan urges you to go check out  XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler’s Galaxy Nexus tear down and unboxing.
READ ON »

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Here at XDA-Developers, development isn’t just something we do, its what we do.  Samsung recognizes this, and would like for us to draw your attention to the Smart App Developer Challenge 2012, which will be helping sponsor XDA TV for the next couple of months.

The challenge is looking for app developers to create new and innovative applications for the Samsung Galaxy Tab and the Galaxy Note and upload them to Samsung Apps. Samsung will then award 80 lucky winners with a combined $4.08 million. The contest is split up into two categories Super Apps and S Pen Apps, with 60 and 20 winners respectively. The S Pen category is looking for apps that are built using the S Pen SDK, and the Super Apps category is further split into game and non-game apps, each with 30 winners. In other words, the top 20 S Pen Apps, top 30 Games, and top 30 Non-Game Apps will be selected as winners.

The contest is accepting application entries from now until September 30, and winners will be selected based on sheer download numbers during that time period. It is thus in your best interest to enter as soon as possible in order to rack up as many downloads as you can. Winners will be announced on October 31, and will be broken down as follows:

Head over to the the official site to get started.

 

 

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Jordan3

In this episode of This Week in Development, Jordan the highlights from this week’s XDA Portal articles. Jordan spends a lot of time talking about the new Samsung Galaxy S III, from the Samsung Unpacked 2012 announcement, to XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler‘s Hacker’s Overview of the Galaxy S III processor and the new Galaxy S III forum being added. Also, Jordan covers the CM9 release for the Galaxy Note, and the HD2 getting Ice Cream Sandwich Hardware Acceleration. Jordan mentioned the article detailing the ability to remove Facebook Messenger and Facebook Camera from the App Drawer. Finally, Jordan mentioned XDA TV’s AdamOutler’s Part 2 of How to Build an Android App and his article on Android Programming.

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Jordan2 (480x320)

In This Week in Development, our friend Jordan is back to give you a quick run down of all the stories you need to know from this week’s XDA Portal articles. Jordan covers many different device freedom stories from, most HTC devices getting S-Off, as well as most HTC bootloaders being unlockable.

HTC is not the only OEM being freed for development; Jordan talks about the Samsung Galaxy Nexus getting a permanent SIM unlock. Also covered are the Phone Mods Section of The Galaxy Nexus toolkit being released and app editing software Virtuous Ten Studio going into public beta. Finally, Jordan covers the “Perfect” phone article by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler, and SuperCID for the Amaze 4G and Rezound.

Check out the video below.

READ ON »

Root

Rooting is the lifeblood of XDA. As such, obtaining root on a device is usually a prime candidate for recognition. This is with good reason, as root access allows users to flash ROMs, kernels, mods, and so on. What then do you say about a root method that has over two dozen supported devices? One word: Awesome. XDA Forum Member StoneBoyTony originally created a root method for the Samsung Galaxy Mini running Gingerbread, but the root method is also compatible with a very large number of other Samsung devices.

Rooting using this method is simple. Download the update.zip file, place it on the root of your SD card, boot into stock Android recovery, and install the update.zip. Really easy. There’s no ADB or script usage required from your computer. What is especially nice about this root method is that StoneBoyTony has put up how to do it for most of the phones on the list. Additionally, StoneBoyTony also provides an unroot update.zip that’s installed the exact same way as the update.zip.

Need more? Okay! The root method is compatible with these phones from Gingerbread version 2.3.3 to 2.3.7, so if you get an OTA for a newer version of Gingerbread, simply flash the unroot update.zip, install the OTA, and then simply re-install the rooted update.zip. No more worrying if the new OTA will break root. Unless it’s ICS, that is; but for many of these phones, that is a pipe dream.

Update: The developer has requested to have his work taken off of the forums. We apologize for any inconvenience.

618px-Over_9000_Vector_by_Vernacular

Heimdall Suite, an Open-Source Cross-Platform set of tools designed to flash firmware to Samsung devices, has received an incremental update to version 1.3.2. This latest update supports Galaxy S II GT-I9100, Galaxy PlayerCaptivate, Vibrant, Fascinate, Mesmerize, Epic 4G, Galaxy S 4G, Infuse 4G, GT-I9000T, Galaxy Tab (7 and 10.1 inches) and of course the Galaxy S GT-i9000.  If your Samsung device is not listed here, testing is required.

Heimdall has always been a favorite among kernel developers and those who frequently flash the latest kernels because no flashable update.zip or Odin packaging is required.   A Heimdall user can simply put their device into Download Mode, and click a button to flash a new zImage directly. XDA Recognized Developer Benjamin Dobell‘s  latest release improves compatibility with Loke (the flash receiver on the device) and expands comparability to several new devices.

In the words of the developer:

Version 1.3.2 addresses some compatibility issues with several devices i.e. the Galaxy Player 5.0 and Galaxy S II. In particular the “Failed to confirm end of file transfer sequence!” error should no longer occur under regular use. This was fixed by mapping a previously unknown protocol parameter, which I’ve now called “chip identifier”, to information in a device’s PIT file. A big thanks goes out to XDA developers user ambrice, who helped identify the cause of the issue.

Head on over to the original thread , get the source code , and check out the official product page.

 

Screenshot at 2012-03-27 16:05:52

A few days ago some users of certain Samsung Galaxy devices began to notice that within the pending updates in the Play Store (that name still feels wrong), was a strange app that they had not installed and the description of which was entirely in Russian. The application was entitled МТС Мобильная Почта, and has since been removed. What’s more, users were unable to actually find this app on their device to uninstall it. Understandably those affected were somewhat concerned about this, fearing that they had fallen victim to some kind of malware. Thankfully it wasn’t, and the MTC application itself is nothing more than an E Mail client for Russia’s Mobile Telecom Systems published by the developers OJSC.

Shortly after the issue was reported, it was discovered that uninstalling certain Samsung specific apps would prevent this MTC application from being listed under “My Apps” or the pending updates.

As identified by the nice folks at The Verge, it turns out that the E Mail application included in stock Samsung firmwares was given the “unique” application name com.seven.Z7—the same unique name as the MTC app. Apparently Seven, who used to develop E Mail services for WinMo but now offer their applications as white labels to third parties, made the mistake of giving the two applications the same name and certificate, thereby confusing the Play Store. Obviously the Samsung Mail client was not listed on Google Play, whereas the MTC app was. This caused many users to see this fictitious update for an app they did not have installed.

Anyone who was affected by this issue should already have seen it resolve itself thanks to action taken by Google, however if for any reason you are still seeing this app then the simplest solution seems to be simply clearing the Google Play’s cache and/or data. There is no longer any need to remove your Samsung specific applications, as the root of the issue is now resolved.

This does of course bring to light a possible hole in the security of the Play Store. Although this has happened before, it was not on such a large or widely reported scale. I would certainly imagine that Google will be looking to make some adjustments and make sure that this kind of error is no longer possible. Although reproducing it with malicious intent would not be easy, as the same unique app identifier and matching certificate would be required. And to be fair to Google, considering that the Samsung Mail client was not actually listed on the Play Store, technically there was no duplication of the unique ID that they could have been aware of. It still seems that there’s room for improvement here though, as Google’s rather lax policy of app screening has repeatedly come under close scrutiny. While they are not at fault here, that wouldn’t really matter if this were a malicious app rather than a simple mix up.

Rapid Charger

Hardware mods can be tricky business. Modifying software is one thing, because if it messes up you can always restore that back up that all our rooted readers should have by now. Then it’s back to normal to try something different another day. With hardware mods, though, there’s a much bigger risk because if you mess up it is the end of the line for whatever you’re hardware modding. So, with that in mind, be careful when doing hardware mods because if it gets messed up, that’s the end of the road.

Depressing consequences aside, XDA Recognized Developer TRusselo has posted a way to modify cheap aftermarket rapid AC chargers to perform like OEM Samsung AC chargers do. This would provide users with the full charging capacity of the Samsung branded AC chargers at a cheaper price.

The modification is pretty self explanatory and involves simply bending and connecting a few pins within the charger itself to fool the Samsung Android phone into believing it’s using a real Samsung charger. As TRusselo explains:

The theory behind it is with samsung galaxy phones and “official chargers”:
if the middle 2 data pins on the usb, while getting 5v to the outer 2 pins it tells the phone that it is an *official samsung* charger and enables full speed charging.

without the middle 2 pins connected (with or without data flow) will not charge at full speed. even if you supply 800mA it will only charge around 350mA.

This mod fixes that 350mA problem and charges the phone at the full capacity it supports. It is highly recommended that you not try this if it’s your only charger, as breaking it will leave you charging via USB and nobody likes to charge via USB.

For anyone who’s interesting in turning their chargers into Samsung chargers, check out the modification thread for photos of how it works and a complete explanation on how and why it works. Additionally, for those carrying the Samsung Galaxy Nexus, check out your local kernel devs to see if they’ve implemented the force AC charge kernel mod for theoretically similar, but without the hardware modification.

fc14

Samsung Epic 4G Touch owners, begin celebrating! XDA Senior Member Calkulin has posted the leaked FC14 4.0.3 firmware, stock and rooted with busybox installed, along with a de-odexed version and the FC14 modem.

The developer warns that users installing the update must flash both the firmware file and the FC14 modem in the same ClockworkMod recovery session because after installation and rebooting you will no longer have CWM recovery. The developer also notes that a factory reset and data wipe is recommended, and he has included a flashable zip that will guarantee all partitions are formatted properly.

Shortly after Calkulin‘s original post, XDA Senior Member qbking77 posted two youtube videos regarding the update—an installation guide and a review of the update. If that sounds like something you’d like to take advantage of, you can check them out here.

All the downloads and information can be found in the original post here. Best of luck to those who attempt to install it!

Samsung Galaxy S II

Sometimes bad things happen and you don’t even know it. Flashing modules can wreck your WiFi, kernels can bork your camera and, and flashing some ROMs can mess with your EFS folder—and thus your IMEI—on Samsung devices including the popular Galaxy S II I9100.

XDA Forum Member vaskodogamagmail has posted about a method that may help users restore their IMEI if the all-important EFS folder is modified by accident. In a nut shell, restoring your backed up IMEI involves deleting the corrupted EFS folder, creating a new one, and doing a few file modifications with a root-enabled file explorer. In the words of the developer:

so I researched. searched all the forums and didn’t find anything that could cure my phone’s IMEI and set it to the original IMEI number. so I experimented and after some hours, I fixed my IMEI.
one thing that led me to the conclusion that ” .nv_data ” file is the thing that I need to fix the IMEI is that they share a very look alike name, and they have the same 2MB size.

While the guide was written with the Galaxy S II in mind, the method should work on all Samsung devices with EFS folders. Those looking to restore their IMEI should visit the original thread for additional information and the full method. Just be sure to back up your device, including the contents of your EFS folder, before getting started.

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After shipping 300 million handsets in 2011, Samsung is arguably the biggest and most important handset manufacturer at present. HTC seeks to challenge this with devices in its new One series, and Samsung is still seen by many to fall behind HTC when it comes to third party development.

While we at XDA don’t tend to cover petitions on the portal, it was felt that this one could potentially result in some major benefits for device users if it gains more traction. The petition came about as a result of XDA Recognized Developer, and CyanogenMod Device Maintainer, Codeworkx, and his detailed post detailing what is holding back traction of custom ROMs on the Samsung Galaxy S2.

It is hoped that this petition will gather enough weight that it can be presented to Samsung Mobile, in the hope of greater future cooperation with third party developers on all their devices. To read more about the petition, and sign it for yourself, click here.

Interview

Finally we got to the third and final part of this interesting interview:
If you missed previous parts, you can find them in here for Pt. 1, and here for Pt. 2

orb3000: What would you recommend to anyone interested in entering the
high-level hardware mod world?

AdamOutler: I would recommend getting a hold of some tools and hardware, get
on google and do it!

I’d choose the standard $60 Radio Shack temperature controlled soldering
iron, some breadboards, leds, 1kohm resistors, and a microcontroller. Any
open-hardware development board will teach you how to work with inputs and
outputs. One of my favorite development boards is the Arduino series. Some people may say, “hey, Arduino is not real hardware development, it’s too easy…BlaBlaBla… Whatever, they’re cheap and
work well. let me ask you, if you’re trying to prototype or learn
something, should it be easy or convoluted?. I’ve managed to make several
devices which solve real-world problems using my Arduinos including EMF
detection for locating a source of interference at work and UART processing
for developing Unbrickable Mod.

To really get into digital communications, you’ll want some additional tools
like the Bus Pirate. The Bus Pirate is a universal serial interface used to
communicate with just about anything at low speeds. It’s open-hardware and
known as The Hacker’s Multi-tool.

For troubleshooting and circuit identification, you’ll want something like
the Logic Sniffer. It can record digital highs and lows then display them on your desktop screen where you can run filters and detect logical patterns.

While I’m at it… I don’t think I can hammer this point enough; Use
Open-Hardware.
With Open-Hardware(like OMAP44xx) you can get all the information you need.
With proprietary hardware (like Qualcrapp processors) you have nothing to
work with.

orb3000: Why is your adamoutler.com main site generally down?

AdamOutler: My main webserver is a Texas Instruments EvalBot.
This is a Texas Instruments Development Board with an ARMv3 processor. Its
form-factor is designed to roll around the floor, bounce off walls, turn 90
degrees and keep going. For some reason it came with an Ethernet port, so I
re purposed the device to serve web pages. It does not do a very good job
and it locks up all the time. I could probably use a real web-server instead
of a development board on wheels.

orb3000: Finally, please tell us a bit of the Adam outside the hardware world, what do you do for a living? What is your current device?

AdamOutler: Heh, the funny thing is that what I do for a living is in the
hardware world… I’m an electronics tech. I have been working in
electronics for 13 years. In 1999, I joined the Army as a Radar Repairer
and my job was to keep multi-million dollar Artillery, Rocket and Missile
Radars operational at all costs. I changed jobs to be a Biomedical
Equipment Technician after working with Radars in Iraq.

I’m currently in the Civil Service, but I’m still performing Inspection, PM,
calibration, and rebuilding medical equipment (like infusion pumps, x-rays
and ultrasounds) in a hospital as my daily job. Being a biomed and keeping
things in-line with regulations is a stark contrast to modifying radars.
When I’m at work, non-manufacturer authorized modifications can kill
someone. When I get home and work on mobile devices, I can kinda “let
loose”. The worst that can happen with mobile devices is it breaks. At
work, I could face much worse. :)

My current daily phone is an Infuse 4G. My current Dev phone is a Samsung Captivate. My current development tablet is Nook Tablet.

orb3000: Thanks a lot for your time, any final comments you want to make?

AdamOutler: Yes. Since this will be on the XDA Portal and many
manufacturers will see this..

I believe Google chose OMAP4460 because it is the only truly open-hardware
processor available. Open-Hardware means device manufacturers can be
self-sufficient and modders can get the information they need.
Closed-Hardware means it has a relatively short life-cycle.

Samsung: Your Exynos 4210 processor without datasheets is now obsolete
because you chose to keep 1/2 of the datasheets private. I don’t know of a
single person who, with any sort of planning, would say “hey, I want that
processor because of ${Maintainability, Ease of use, Cost Effectiveness}”
All of these qualities are missing when you lock down your datasheets.

Qualcomm: Is there any benefeit to using a Qualcomm processor? Can you
prove it? As far as I can tell, they’re the Celerons of the ARM world.
About the only benefeit to using a Qualcomm processor is integral call
processor. However if the device manufacturers actually cared about the
device and its ability to work through upgrades they would never use
Qualcomm. Here’s a factoid, Qualcomm does not even let the manufacturers
have access to bootloaders. You do realize that the only reason people are
using your chips in their devices is because they think you might know
something they can learn from right?

NVidia: Sure TEGRA extensions are great, but we can’t program them into the
latest versions of Android without knowledge of how they work. You’ve closed
your hardware and thereby stifled development.

Texas Instruments: Good Job! Other processor manufacturers take note. Texas
Instruments is on the rise in the ARM industry because of decisions made by
all other processor manufacturers. We need more Open-Hardware to work with.

BTW… If anyone has access to Samsung Exynos 4210 Chapter 19, entitled
“Boot Sequence” or similar, I need it. The manual I have stops at Chapter
18.

Thats a lot of knowledge!. Hope you all have enjoyed the interview, if so please share it, want someone to be interviewed? Let us know!
Thanks for reading.

Interview

Welcome to the second part of the interview with Recognized Developer AdamOutler:
Here you can find the first part in case you missed it.

orb3000: We know you have the longest bash script ever written, what is made for exactly?

AdamOutler: Mythical Librarian was a
project I created over the course of 6 months. At the time, my daughter was
3, could not read and liked TV Shows like Dora the Explorer, Sesame Street
and others. I found a way to make it so she could point to the show she
wanted to watch, with proper naming convention, XBMC could assign pictures
to each episode and she could select which TV Show she wanted to watch. The
idea behind this project was to automate the process of recording a video,
looking up the season and episode numbers, then renaming. Sounds simple
right?

I began with BASHSEXX(Bash SeasonXX, EpisodeXX). It evolved to support
MythTV’s database and was renamed MythSEXX. Eventually it got a small
following, people started reporting bugs, the script was supporting a large
number of functions and databases and was “thinking” on its own, so it was
renamed mythicalLibrarian.

Long story short, it takes a recording, references an online database,
parses, creates a local textual database, looks TVShows up based on
SeriesID, Original Airdate, Show Title and Episode Title, utilizes standard
and fuzzy logic, grades its performance, makes decisions if its going to
redo the lookup at a later time, maintains filesystem symlinks and manages
metadata. It talks to GNOME desktop, XBMC and MythTV. mythicalLibrarian
generates RSS feeds upon each action via Apache web server.
mythicalLibrarian also has the ability to update itself from the latest SVN
or Stable version.

The end result is the user can use XBMC as a better front-end for MythTV.
XBMC uses mythicalLibrarian to get information which downloads cover-art,
fan-art, episode-art, and displays detailed information about the episode,
while MythTV handles disk-space issues and recording.

I believe it’s main portion is now the longest BASH script in existence.

orb3000: Regarding your current projects such as Unsecure boot on the Nook Tablet, running Ubuntu on Nook tablet, Exynos4120 UnBrickable Mod, what is the actual status and what users can expect from those amazing tools?

AdamOutler: While I did put in a lot of research into Unsecure Boot on the
Nook Tablet and even prototyped Nook Tablet ModChips, XDA Junior Member
Bauwks came up with a total software solution. This solution is now the
defacto standard used in all custom Nook Table booting including Ubuntu.

As for Ubuntu booting, there is considerable work going into a Nook Tablet
3.0 Kernel. This is required for proper operation of Ubuntu. The older 2.6
kernel will boot Ubuntu just fine, but there are problems which cannot be
corrected without proper underlying datastructures. The Ubuntu Recovery
system I came up with works well and will recover a dead Nook Tablet from
any known cause of bricking. I will continue this project as soon as I get my hands on a 3.0 kernel.

The Exynos4210 UnBrickable Mod is complete. We are now researching firmware
solutions. I have worked with Rebellos via Internet and it would appear
that the most logical solution would be to simply send it to him. He will
attempt to write new bootloaders and make GS2 UnBrickable Mod a reality.
Believe me, I want this badly as I receive several PMs per week asking about
the status of GS2 UBM.

orb3000: You have opened a thread called Do you want to help out
developers? Got a broken device?
How the project is going, and what would
you like to ask/advice the donors?. We would like to take this opportunity
to remind everyone participating to help us to keep thread clean.

AdamOutler: A broken device may be something most people throw away.
However, to myself and others, they are research tools.
I stated devices in which I am interested at the top of the thread. Many members have posted
other devices which they are willing to part with. I would like to
encourage other developers and hardware hackers to take advantage of this
and use it as a resource for their projects.

Expect the third and last part soon. Thanks for reading.

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