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Posts Tagged: SDK

1SDK

Installing the Android SDK and ADT is the first step in the long road towards coding your first Android application. Getting these tools onto your computer is also the first step towards many other goals such as obtaining ADB access and using DDMS.

While there are plenty of simpler ways to go about accomplishing the latter two tasks, it’s often best to learn the old fashioned way. And in this case, that’s installing the SDK and using that to give you the required CLI binaries. Plus, by installing the required tools to

Thankfully for both those looking to learn how to code and those looking to download binaries to use ADB and Fastboot, there is now an excellent and incredibly thorough guide geared at helping users get started. The guide comes from XDA Senior Member Apex and it covers quite a few topics.

First off, the guide starts by explaining what the SDK and ADT are, what they do, and why you want them. Next, it covers the basics of keeping a proper dev environment, installing the JDK on various OSes, and installing an IDE of your choosing. It then walks users through installing the SDK itself, as well as the ADT plugin for Eclipse and setting up a virtual device with the AVD Manager. Finally, it walks you through the basics of creating a simple speech recognition and synthesis app, as well as various ADB commands (version 1.0.20) that may be come in handy.

All in all, this is an incredibly thorough guide that will serve as a great resource for anyone getting ready to start developing some apps. Those eager to get started can do so by visiting the original thread.

using-hidden-internal-api

Pssst… over here. Yeah, did you know about the Hidden Android Classes? Shhh… it’s a secret. They let you do stuff you otherwise couldn’t. You can read internal data, like the text message database stored on a phone. You can also gain lower level access to the hardware in order to extend your app’s access to things like the touchscreen input values, or WiFi radio usage. To get your hands on that kind of contraband, you’ll need to do some poking around in the Android SDK, and make a few… changes… to the way your Eclipse ADT plugin works.

This information comes to our attention because XDA Recognized Developer E:V:A bumped his own post out of year-old obscurity, but boy are we glad he did. If you like to do things you’re not supposed to, it’ll be worth your time to read the guide. Head on over to his original thread for full details.

E:V:A’s work boils down the avalanche of information on the subject which was posted by Inazaruk a couple of years ago. The Java classes that are known synonymously as Hidden or Internal Classes are protected from direct use and hidden from being shown in the Java docs (using the @hide directive). Using them is just a matter of hacking the android.jar file and tweaking your IDE setup to stop blocking your path to the forbidden fruit.

One thing I think Inazaruk and E:V:A both missed was a simple explanation of possible applications for the hidden classes. Read more about that in this article.

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