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Posts Tagged: SDK

LGlogo

LG has been very involved in Android ever since they became the hardware manufacturer for Google with the Nexus 4 and Nexus 5, and if the rumors are true, the G Watch. They’ve also upped the ante with the G2 and the soon to be released G3, and today they’ve announced their new QCircle SDK for developers.

The SDK gives developers the ability to utilize features found in LG’s G2 and G3, most notably QCircle, QSlide, and QRemote:

  • LG QCircle is a new folio case that lets users receive and interact with basic functions of their smartphone directly from the round QuickCircle window, without having to open the case. With the new LG QCircle SDK, developers can enhance their apps with this redefined UX, making their apps compatible and directly accessible from the QuickCircle window.
  • LG QSlide Function amps up multitasking, letting users open multiple apps that can be resized and moved to float on the screen. Developers that leverage the LG Qslide Function SDK, simplify toggling between apps that can be resized into small windows that users can still see even when they run other apps.
  • LG QRemote enables LG smartphones to easily become universal remote controls that are compatible with many different IR (infrared) home entertainment systems. The LG QRemote SDK provides APIs to control IR-controlled devices easily, so developers can quickly enable their apps for the connected home.
  • LG QPair is a feature that provides a seamless environment between Android phones running Android 4.1 or later and LG tablets. With the QPair SDK, set for release soon, developers can create interesting apps that run over the QPair connection. For example, calls can be received, messages can be sent and SNS can be updated on one device while simultaneously being synced with other devices.

All of these new SDKs will be featured at their 2014 LG Developer Event which is scheduled for the night before Google I/O kicks off – Tuesday, June 24 from 6pm – 9pm in San Francisco. Engineers will provide more information about how developers will be able to extend their LG devices by using these new SDKs. You can register for the Developer Event here or read the full press release here.

Look for more information to come involving LG, their SDKs, and XDA-Developers.

1SDK

Installing the Android SDK and ADT is the first step in the long road towards coding your first Android application. Getting these tools onto your computer is also the first step towards many other goals such as obtaining ADB access and using DDMS.

While there are plenty of simpler ways to go about accomplishing the latter two tasks, it’s often best to learn the old fashioned way. And in this case, that’s installing the SDK and using that to give you the required CLI binaries. Plus, by installing the required tools to

Thankfully for both those looking to learn how to code and those looking to download binaries to use ADB and Fastboot, there is now an excellent and incredibly thorough guide geared at helping users get started. The guide comes from XDA Senior Member Apex and it covers quite a few topics.

First off, the guide starts by explaining what the SDK and ADT are, what they do, and why you want them. Next, it covers the basics of keeping a proper dev environment, installing the JDK on various OSes, and installing an IDE of your choosing. It then walks users through installing the SDK itself, as well as the ADT plugin for Eclipse and setting up a virtual device with the AVD Manager. Finally, it walks you through the basics of creating a simple speech recognition and synthesis app, as well as various ADB commands (version 1.0.20) that may be come in handy.

All in all, this is an incredibly thorough guide that will serve as a great resource for anyone getting ready to start developing some apps. Those eager to get started can do so by visiting the original thread.

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using-hidden-internal-api

Pssst… over here. Yeah, did you know about the Hidden Android Classes? Shhh… it’s a secret. They let you do stuff you otherwise couldn’t. You can read internal data, like the text message database stored on a phone. You can also gain lower level access to the hardware in order to extend your app’s access to things like the touchscreen input values, or WiFi radio usage. To get your hands on that kind of contraband, you’ll need to do some poking around in the Android SDK, and make a few… changes… to the way your Eclipse ADT plugin works.

This information comes to our attention because XDA Recognized Developer E:V:A bumped his own post out of year-old obscurity, but boy are we glad he did. If you like to do things you’re not supposed to, it’ll be worth your time to read the guide. Head on over to his original thread for full details.

E:V:A’s work boils down the avalanche of information on the subject which was posted by Inazaruk a couple of years ago. The Java classes that are known synonymously as Hidden or Internal Classes are protected from direct use and hidden from being shown in the Java docs (using the @hide directive). Using them is just a matter of hacking the android.jar file and tweaking your IDE setup to stop blocking your path to the forbidden fruit.

One thing I think Inazaruk and E:V:A both missed was a simple explanation of possible applications for the hidden classes. Read more about that in this article.

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