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Posts Tagged: sony

SonyRooted

Just because a device hasn’t been released, is in limited release, or isn’t in the hand of a developer doesn’t mean that developers cannot root the device. XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire has rooted a pre-release device a few times, such as when he remotely rooted the Samsung Galaxy S III. Today, we are talking about Chainfire’s CF-Auto-Root in a roundabout way.

XDA Recognized Developer DooMLoRD took the Nexus 4 version of CF-Auto-Root, modified it a bit, did a dance to the rooting gods, and crossed his fingers. Using TeamViewer, which we’ve reviewed in the past, to remotely attempt rooting, he was successful. Thanks to Chainfire’s app and DooMLoRD’s dancing, the Sony Xperia Z now has root.

It is important to note that you need to have firmware version 10.1.A.1.350, an unlocked bootloader, and fastboot files for this to work. Check out the original thread to find out more.

Jordan0215

Android 4.2.2 is rolling out to most current Nexus devices. That story and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week.  Jordan talks about the other video released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an app review this week comparing two gesture control apps, Trigger and LMT.

In Sony Xperia news, Jordan talks about the kernel source release for the Sony Xperia Z, a device that isn’t even available for purchase. Additionally, Jordan talks about the app fine-tuning and debugging tool released by Sony developers. Pull up a chair and check out this video. Finally, be sure to check out all the other news from XDA-Developers.

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Xperia_T_JB_alpha

Here at XDA, we take the responsibility of carriers and OEMs to provide timely updates to their devices (and to honor their GPL requirements) seriously. There are those who do a good job (Samsung is one of them), those who don’t always do a good job (HTC, Motorola, LG), and those who do a terrible job (Huawei, ZTE, Rockchip to name a few). But there is one who right now is doing a terrific job, and that is Sony Mobile.

Back at the end of 2012, we selected Sony Mobile as our OEM of the Year for many reasons. One of those had to do with their public support of the developer community. Another was the release of beta OS builds for impending updates, shared on XDA by Sony staff in order to seed the ROM development pipeline. In addition, they were very active in supporting AOSP for the Sony Xperia S in the Google AOSP device tree, released the AOSP binaries, and eventually branched out to open their own Github for future AOSP development.

On Friday, Sony continued their string of community contributions by releasing an ALPHA build of Jelly Bean (Android 4.1.2) for the Sony Xperia T. This build is most definitely an alpha, meaning that many of the core components do not work, so it is not meant to be flashed or even mucked around with by the end user. It is meant solely for custom ROM developers to take and use and help make it better in preparation for Sony’s upcoming official build of Jelly Bean for the Xperia T. In order to flash this you will need to use their EMMA tool and your device must have its bootloader unlocked, or else the device will boot to a black screen and you will need to return to stock via Sony’s Update Tool. More information can be found at their Developer World blog. Again, this is not for the end user.

Sony evidently wasn’t content just to be the only OEM to provide OFFICIAL alpha builds for their devices. They ALSO released the kernel source for the alpha build. No other company in our memory has ever done this. Sure, one could argue that it is their obligation to release the kernel source under GPL requirements because they distributed the alpha build. But let’s keep in mind that we’re talking about an ALPHA build—something that is essentially in the infant-stages of its evolution, and not a production build or a finished product.

Let’s also keep in mind that instead of letting it leak like other manufacturers do, and thus not need to adhere to the GPL because they can claim ignorance and that they themselves aren’t the one distributing, they are embracing the fact that the GPL is not harmful. They are stating their case that this is how OEMs should work with the community. They are saying that this sort of thing encourages trust and a sense of togetherness between the community and the OEM, which in turn trickles down to the consumer’s good will towards the OEM. It’s a veritable marketplace “circle of life.” (You’re welcome for having planted the Lion King firmly in your subconscious for the next few hours.)

Other OEMs, like Samsung, frequently release incomplete kernel source that will not build (GPL violation); or fail to release the kernel source for a production build that they later retract even though it was distributed and is live in the wild on consumer’s devices (GPL violation). Or in the case of HTC, just plain ignore the GPL and wait for petitions to be filed or lawyers to be engaged before releasing the kernel source for a software version that is now out of date (GPL violation).

Let this be a lesson to the OEMs out there: When you choose to embrace the very ecosystem that has driven your profits high, and endeavor to work with that ecosystem in a mutual give-and-take, you will see positive results and karma that far exceeds your expectations. Or you can choose to neglect the very base that at one time made you the top smartphone manufacturer in the world and ultimately see your profits and market share slide into the abyss where there is little to no hope of return. Your choice. Choose wisely.

ces2013_large_480

Another wonderful International CES has passed us by. The event was filled with many exciting displays, like the Intel Ultrabook Tree, but most important were the announcements made by many manufactures. Some announcements are still years out, embodying nothing more than an idea. Other announcements having working prototypes, while still others are in the final stages before release or have been released.

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xperiaz

At the 2013 International CES, manufacturer of the year Sony released two phones. The  phones are similar and share similar names. These devices are called the Sony Xperia Z and Xperia ZL. The Xperia Z is water and dust proof while the Xperia ZL has a hardware camera button.

XDA News Specialist Jordan was on site and got a chance to get his hands on the Xperia twins. Jordan sat down and talked with the folks and Sony. In this video, he shares what he learned and shows off the devices. Check it out to see what the newest Xperias look like.

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Xperia

After much fanfare and high production value videos and presentation efforts, including an XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler-style tear down and reassembly videos of cameras and mobile devices, the executives at Sony took the stage at CES to talk about their wares. They spoke about their commitment to pushing the envelope. They talked at length about their new televisions and 4K content.

But the really exciting part was when they announced the new Sony Xperia Z. With a quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro processor and a 5-inch full HD 1080p screen, the Xperia Z could be quite a contender. Talking with XDA Developer TV Producer Jordan, it did seem as though the Xperia Z was a bit of a me too device. “All the other manufacturers already have fancy, quad-core phones, so should we.” However, Sony is being very generous with their support of the open source community, so it is nice to see that there is a decent phone that is fairly open to development. Also, Sony talked about their one-touch technology, where you can tap your phone on a speaker or television remote to get sound playing on the speakers or a video playing on your television.

I imagine that the Sony Xperia Z, with the right vendor relationships of course, will be a decent force in the mobile scene in the next few months. It looks like an also ran at this point, but the device has something special about it that you can’t quite put your finger on.

phone_connected_648x461

When you purchase a device, it’s always desirable to be able to use it as you wish. Sadly, this is often not the case. This is because most of the time, people purchase devices with a carrier subsidy. What this means is that essentially the carrier is letting you purchase the device at a reduced rate, say $300 off suggested retail, with the terms of a contract stating you will stay with them for (usually) two years. This guarantees that they will keep their ARPU (average revenue per user) over that time.

The trade off is that if you break the contract, they will charge you an ETF (early-termination fee), which adds up to the same amount they “discounted” the phone for, prorated of course. Usually rolled in with that trade off is an agreement between the manufacturer and the carrier that the bootloader is locked, giving the carrier the full control of the device instead of you. Of course, with the talented developers here at XDA-Developers, bootloaders are often hacked, returning the control of the device to the user.

What often doesn’t happen though is manufacturers deciding to give you control of the device on their own, which is exactly what Sony has done with their beta flash tool they call “Emma.” Sure Samsung “leaked” ODIN, but that’s entirely different. This is Sony creating a tool and freely making it available, and then going the extra step to show you how to use it. The tool is for the Xperia S, Xperia Arc, Xperia Arc S, and Xperia T, with more devices to be added in the future. Emma is essentially a “return to stock” tool that will work regardless of what software you currently have installed on your Xperia device, though it does require the bootloader be unlocked which Sony is again more than happy to show you how to do. The other requirements for the tool are that you have Windows installed and a current version of JAVA.

You can use the tool to choose between different stock versions of firmware, which the tool will automatically download for you from Sony’s servers. There are some quirky things with the tool however, with the connection to the Sony servers being temperamental and general JAVA issues. That said, the tool is still in beta, so head on over to the discussion thread to address any issues you might be having and to download the tool.

 

Jordan1130

It is Friday, and Jordan is here to round up the news stories from this week on XDA. Jordan talks about HoRNDIS, which allows you to tether on a Mac easily. In XDA-specific news, Jordan talks about developers discussion forum being trialed in the Note II forums. Jordan mentions the three videos posted this week on XDA Developer TV. The first video released this week was by XDA TV Producer TK and talked about rooting the Samsung Galaxy Note II. The second video was by Elite Recognized Developer and TV Producer AdamOutler, and it talked about Linux Apps on Android devices. Also, TK released an app review on the One Power Guard.

In Sony news, Jordan talks about Verizon allowing the bootloader to be unlocked on the Xperia Play. Also, Jordan mentions the article on accessing PlayStation Games on non-certified devices. Lastly, Jordan talks about the article and thread asking what your favorite news article and XDA Developer TV video is from this year. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

DASHcode_590x396

If you’ve followed XDA for a while, you will likely know that we have somewhat mixed feelings towards Sony and the attitude they used to (notice the use of past tense) take towards the developer community. If anyone remembers back to the legal battle against George Hotz, where a multi-million dollar corporation essentially went full force against an underground developer/hacker for letting people know how to run CFW (custom firmware) on their Playstation consoles, it was something that earned (and rightfully so) the rage and anger of the entire modder community. However, it seems that the Japanese conglomerate is turning around and trying a different approach towards this group of customers (us).

According to a recent post on Google+ by XDA Recognized Developer cyanogen, Sony has literally opened the flood gates by adding the Dynamic Android Sensor Hardware Abstraction Layer (DASH for short) to the world of open source. What this means essentially is that now developers have access to and can contribute towards the development and betterment of the code behind the sensor hardware’s inner workings. This is rather interesting, and quite  a big step for manufacturers, since this kind of information is usually obtained via reverse engineering, espionage, or (normally) not at all.

Most developers out there who work on porting operating systems (like in this case, cyanogen) spend monumental amounts of time digging through bits and pieces of information that is scarcely available to try and fix bugs caused by incompatibilities between the custom code and the closed source code. So, this addition will have a benefit for both parties: on one side, developers will not have to spend countless hours trying to figure out how to make things work because they will have access to the actual code from the same people who make these. On the other hand, Sony will benefit from the added expertise of the modding community, as we have a bit of a reputation when it comes to finding bugs in manufacturer’s products. This goes hand in hand with the addition of the Xperia S to the device vendor list in the AOSP source.

This is indeed quite a change of heart by the same people who just a little over two years ago were in absolute denial and going after underground hackers, who ironically were their customers and a big driving force behind a percentage of their sales. Keep going down the right path, Sony! We are proud of you and we sincerely hope that the others will follow your example as well (ahem… HTC… we hope you are taking down notes). Last but not least, a big thumbs up for cyanogen and his team for opening Sony’s eyes. Way to go, guys!

You can find more information in the original article from Sony’s blog. You can also read cyanogen’s comments on his G+ page.

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

[Thanks to pulser_g2 for the tip!]

 

sony device loaner program

We recently told you about numerous things Sony has been doing in an attempt to embrace the independent developer community. Starting with official ICS test builds then providing instructions to build kernels for their Xperia S, they are now at it again.

On their Developer World Blog, they just recently announced a new program that they are calling the Device Loaner Program. Essentially, if you are an Android developer and would like to test your application against a physical device but cannot afford one, just hit up their program. The quick details are as follows:

The Device Loaner Program was created with you, the developer, in mind. For the smaller studios and independent developers with limited resources, this is a perfect program to take advantage of. With it, you can immediately borrow an Xperia™ smartphone for up to 30 days. The service is completely free, and initially aimed at the U.S. and Canadian market. If you’re a developer outside of these markets, please be aware that you’ll be paying for international shipping fees, plus applicable customs/duties for your particular destination.

They currently are offering up pretty much their entire Xperia line, from the new Xperia S to the Arc, X10, and even the LiveView. No other manufacturer is currently going to such lengths to provide the independent developer community with the means to further their product. If you are interested, visit the Device Loaner Program and sign up.

LocationFree

Sony’s LocationFree Player is a system for streaming video content like cable, satellite, home DVR, and even your DVD collection anywhere in the world at any time (think Slingbox, Sony style). Launched in 2004, the service allowed users to stream to devices like the Sony PSP, VAIO Laptops and even to your home television via standalone players. Many people still use the service even though Sony no longer develops it.

One thing the LocationFree service always lacked in comparison to its competitors was support for mobile playback. With the exception of the PSP and a dated Windows Mobile  program, there has been no way to take you LocationFree service with you. XDA forum member mgschwan has created an app for Android that does just that. It’s already been tested on several devices and seems to work well on higher end models. From the original thread:

The current status of the software is:

* Compatible to LF-B1 and LF-B10 BaseStations
* Support for EU and US models
* Remote control support
* Registration works from within the app
* Fullscreen playback
* Works over Wifi/3G/4G

Before getting too excited you should know that mgshwan hasn’t released the app, choosing instead to await approval from Sony. He seems to be having a difficult time contacting an appropriate representative, so anyone who might know where to point him can check out the original thread here. Want to see it in action? Head to the youtube video here!

 

Xperia-Arc-S

Sometimes development can be fueled by nothing more than a well made tool or tutorial that gets people started. In most cases, it’s some sort of kitchen that takes some of the hard parts of making a ROM and turns it into a simple menu option. In other cases, it’s a 10 minute tutorial showing users what’s what and how to do things.

The latter is the case for Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc users, as XDA Senior Member iridaki has taken the time to write an entire tutorial on unpacking, repacking and modifying the image files.

The pre-requisites are relatively simple to understand, and include:

Requirements:
1. Linux (any form will do, for example virtual box etc)
2. Perl (already included in Ubuntu, me thinks)
3. The Xperia Boot Tools package attached in this post
4. The mkbootimg binary (I already compiled it for Linux x86 and included it in the attachment)
5. Reading this post VERY VERY VERY carefully

From there, it’s a bunch of terminal commands that do the work for you. However, as long as you’re attentive and careful then you shouldn’t run into too many problems. And, as always, make sure you make a complete backup of your device before attempting to flash your work, just in case you skipped a step somewhere.

For those budding developers who want to give this process a try, you can check out the full tutorial in the original thread where you can also find discussions and additional information. Being ever so humble, iridaki has also said that if you manage to find any mistakes then you should post them in the thread so corrections can be made.

sonysexywp72

Despite their many efforts, Sony has never been especially popular in the Android world. They have some very nice looking devices, but they have never been able to achieve the popularity of HTC, Samsung, or Motorola with their Android offerings. With that in mind, Sony has been branching out in an attempt to gain some of that all important marketshare. One of the more interesting steps they seem to be taking has been a move into Windows Phone space. Recently there have been leaks back and forth of shots of a slider phone from Sony, sporting the Windows Phone 7 button layout to drive the message home. Slider phones are great for some, but to really compete with a phone like the Nokia Lumia 900, Sony needs to bring something big to the table. Something powerful, sleek, and sexy. Something like the Sony Xperia Arc.

An anonymous source reports that what we see here is a piece of hardware that looks almost exactly like the Xperia Arc, but running Windows Phone 7. From the shots, you can clearly see where Sony has baked in some of their own features in their very own Sony tile, which will undoubtedly work like the HTC Sense tile we’ve seen before. It looks like Sony is planning a multiple device launch into Windows Phone territory, and with any luck they will maintain the modder friendly policies that have adopted recently with their Android devices.

 

UPDATE: Turns out this is fake. Nothing to see here, folks!

 

 

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