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Posts Tagged: source code

aosp

If you’ve ever had a chance to build a ROM from source, no matter if it was AOSP or some other distribution, you might have noticed that the source tree has a lot of folders. Some of them are responsible for keeping device-specific parts, while others are used to coordinate the whole process of building.

If you ever wanted to know what is kept inside of these mysterious folders, you should definitely read a guide written by XDA Senior Member #Superuser. The folder structure will no longer be a mystery, as most folders are described. #Superuser also described the build-specific parts to help you better understand the process of inheriting the source on various configs.

Folder structure isn’t all that’s covered in this guide. Basic build commands are also presented in detail, so even beginners can find something to read about. Every moment is good to learn something new, so if you use Linux or Mac, you should definitely try to build a ROM from source and analyze the folders.

If you are new to the development world, you should definitely give this guide a shot. The best thing you can do is to visit the original thread and read it carefully while syncing source.

Googlenow

We’ve covered How to Build an Android App in the past. We’ve showed you how to install Eclipse and Android SDK and how to write a root app. We even showed you how to develop with Arduino and the Google ADK. There is a lot of thought that needs to go into building an Android app. Building an Android App is not hard, but it is certainly not easy.

In this video, XDA Senior Recognized Developer AdamOutler shows an example of some of the things you can do with some code. AdamOutler makes an app that allows him to launch web pages from Google Now. He talks code, explains what things are and shows you how it works. So if you’ve ever wanted to build an Android App, check this video out.

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codingadk

Recently, XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler talked about why the Google ADK code is poor. In this episode, Adam put out the Hardware Hacker Signal, which looks a bit like a soldering iron, and got some responses. There are ways of working with the ADK and making it work for you.

AdamOutler introduces like minded hardware hacker Kemonine. In this episode, Kemonine shows how to properly code with Arduino software and the Google ADK. Kemonine shows you many different tricks, including using something called the Amarino Toolkit to help you along. So check out this overview of Arduino coding.

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adk2012

We all want to have more Android automation in our homes. XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler set out to do just that and spent around 40 hours attempting to reduce and rewrite the code driving the ADK2012 into something which would be more moldable and bendable.  He failed and he explains why in his rant which he calls the ADK2012 “The Worst Code Ever.”

So if you’ve ever wanted to work with Google Accessory Development Kit, make sure to check out this video. This will give you insight as to what trials and tribulations you may face. Before you engage in a head-desk collision session, check out what Adam has to say.

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logo

When in the course of developing from source, it can become quite cumbersome to find that specific code reference or symbol that is either causing you problems or is the one thing you’re missing. You often find yourself browsing through line after line of code, hoping you don’t miss that snippet you’re looking for. This can get frustrating, and very tiresome, to say the least. With a new set of websites, your life might just get a little simpler.

BBQSauce is a website that allows you to search (and browse) the CM source tree for just about anything. Let’s say that I am working on telephony in CyangoenMod 10.1 and I want to find all instances of the TelephonyProperties string. I would go to the BBQSauce site and type that into the Full Search box, select the corresponding project name (abi, android, bionic, etc.), and then hit search and wait. What would return for me would be each file with all respective entries in each file where my search string showed up, grouped by directory in the source code. Each of those entries are clickable, meaning I will be taken right to the line in the source code where my search string is found.

AndroidXRef is another resource that can be extremely helpful, providing the AOSP source (from 1.6 to 4.2) and the Linux kernel source (versions 2.6.39, 3.0, 3.3 and 3.4) in a browsable and searchable format. Again, AndroidXRef operates in the same way that BBQSauce does, as they both use Oracle’s {OpenGrok source browser.

Both systems provide you with a handy resource at your disposal, one of which can make the life of a developer much easier. In addition, they’ll be able to spend more time making bacon.

[Featured image courtesy of AndroidXRef]

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