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Posts Tagged: tool

NokiaX2Tools

Unveiled in June this year, the Nokia X2 is the Finnish company’s second crack at an Android-powered device. With a 4.3 inch IPS display, a dual core processor, 1GB of RAM, and a price tag under $200, the X2 is a device unique for its dual Windows-Android experience, with Nokia replacing any indication of Android OS with Nokia and Microsoft counterparts. Perhaps not for the wider mainstream market, the Nokia X2 is an interesting device that will definitely perk the interests of some folks. If you happen to be one of these people or have already bought one, you might want to check out Nokia X2 Tools.

Developed by XDA Forum Member Mplus, Nokia X2 Tools is a program which does two of the most important things you can do with your X2 – root it, and install the Google Play store and Google services. After you’ve connected your phone to your PC, run the program and you’ll be prompted with numerous options you can select including:

  • Install Nokia X2 drivers
  • Install/uninstall Google Play store and Google services
  • Root/unroot
  • Boot into recovery

If you would like to check this out yourself, head over to the Nokia X2 Tools thread for more information.

Samsung Gear2

I think it’s pretty safe to say that any sound coming out of a wristwatch isn’t exactly going to be audiophile-grade. But then again, smartwatches aren’t meant to serve as standalone music players (for now at least), with their speakers acting as the outlet for notifications you may receive on your watch. However, if you own a Samsung Gear 2 and find yourself needing a bit of musical accompaniment from your watch as you quietly working at the table, you may want to boost its sound with XDA Forum Member tonydav’s tool.

The tool is a .bat file, which when executed on your PC, will automatically boost the sound volume of your Gear 2 within an indicated minimum and maximum range. XDA Senior Member gav83collins has also written a more detailed tutorial teaching you how to use the tool with accompanying screenshots to help you out. Additionally, the tool has an extra function of installing and deleting ringtones on and off your Gear 2. It should be noted that for this to work, your Gear 2 must be rooted.

If you would like to give this a whirl, check out the Sound Boost tool thread for more information.

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When you are the leader of a large development project, Gerrit isn’t the only tool that can help you keep everything organized. While compiling and uploading a ROM or kernel for one or two devices isn’t overly time-consuming, building for a dozen devices or more can take loads of time and therefore makes it extremely difficult to maintain.
There is a good news, though. You don’t have to launch every nightly build manually.

Not so long ago, our XDA TV Producer AdamOutler gave an overview showing how to use Jenkins. For those who don’t remember, Jenkins is a tool that allows building multiple projects automatically on one of your build servers. While Jenkins isn’t that complicated to use, you can make it even easier. This is possible with a script created by XDA Senior Member streambinder called TSJ.

TSJ is an abbreviation for The Simplified Jenkins. This tool allows users to build multiple projects and upload them directly to an FTP server. Everything is easy and takes just a few moments to configure. We strongly recommend the use of Jenkins to handle large scale nightly or stable releases. It’s a fast and easy way of building ROMs for many users. You can also treat Jenkins and its configuration as a good chance to learn something new. Naturally, this tool will work only on Linux distros.

You can learn more about the TSJ project by visiting the TSJ development thread.

RedMi1S

If you’ve had your eyes on the headlines of the tech industry, you’ve surely noticed the name ‘Xiaomi’ mentioned on more than one occasion. For the unaware, ‘Xiaomi’ is the name of an OEM that many analysts predict to be a rising power in the mobile market, with headlines calling the company the ‘Apple of the East’. Perhaps there’s merit to all this, because after all, Xiaomi’s new phone, the Redmi 1S, sold out in India within 4.2 seconds. So, if you’re looking to purchasing a Xiaomi device, such as the Redmi 1S, you may want to check out XiaomiTool.

Developed by XDA Senior Member linuxxxx, XiaomiTool is an open source tool that lets you manage your compatible Xiaomi device from your PC running either Windows or Linux. Its features include:

  • Backup & Restore
  • Import Photos
  • Root (both custom roms and MiUi Stable)
  • Install apps
  • Push and Pull files
  • Switch to Dalvik
  • Switch to ART
  • Record Screen
  • Install a custom Recovery
  • Repartition (Only Mi* series devices)
  • Flash custom roms (everything automatized, even wipes)
  • Flash Zip files

The tool is compatible with a number of Xiaomi devices, including the

  • Redmi 1S
  • Mi 2S
  • Mi 3W
  • Mi 4W

Other Xiaomi devices are set to receive compatibility with XiaomiTool in the near future, such as the MiPad and Mi 2A, but as of right now, only the above four devices are fully compatible.

If you want to check out the tool yourself, visit the XiaomiTool application thread for more information.

png2rle converter

Unlike other operating systems, Android uses its own graphical image formats. Most of the images use in the OS are PNGs, but there are some devices that use the RLE image format for their kernel logos. This format provides a pretty good compression ratio and is very fast. Sadly, converting a PNG file to RLE isn’t easy and requires some tools. There are plenty of them, but not many can be described as cross-platform and don’t require ImageMagick to work properly.

If you are looking for a simple tool able to convert PNG files into RLE files in just few seconds, XDA Senior Member alireza7991 has created something for you. PNG2RLE is a text tool that converts raw PNG images into the kernel logo compatible format on almost every OS. It works like a charm on Linux, Windows, and even directly on Android.

Usage is very simple and straightforward. You need to execute the binary and put a path to the input and output files. As a result, you’ll get a RLE file ready to be placed in your device’s ramdisk. In case of any problems, you can read the provided ReadMe file that can be found in one of the files on Github, because PNG2RLE is an open-sourced project.

Don’t leave your kernel with a stock and ugly kernel image. Replace it with your favorite PNGs using PNG2RLE. You can get started by visiting the PNG2RLE original thread.

Xperifirm Xperia Firmware Utility

Being able to run an updated version of Android is probably one of the most important things that we look for when it comes to Android devices. This is exemplified in the countless updates we feature here on the XDA Portal every time there is an indication, a leak, and release of new firmware of the major devices in the Android world, making sure you get to enjoy the newest features, bug fixes, and more as early as possible.

There are also specific tools available to help keep your device on track. And since this is a development-oriented site, one of the members of our community created such a utility for Sony devices called Xperifirm. Developed by XDA Forum Member IaguCool, Xperifirm is a tool that allows you to check for and download the most current and up to date official Android firmwares for every single Sony and Sony Ericsson Xperia Device. Xperifirm pulls up every single regional variant of firmware available for your device, and displays each one in a logical and easy to navigate interface.

Xperifirm currently runs only on PCs running Windows XP SP2 and newer at the moment, and requires Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 or newer. You also need to have either Flashtool or Java Runtime Environment installed. And for users of Windows 8 and 8.1, you’ll need to download an extra ZIP package in order to run Xperifirm.

If you would like to give Xperifirm a go, be sure to head over to the Xperifirm tool thread to get started.

AWToolkit for Android Wear

It’s been a while since the first Android Wear devices hit the shelves. Many potential users are still waiting for the Moto 360, but the LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live are already available to purchase. Since its release, these Android Wear devices have already been rooted, TWRP recovery is available, and there are quite a few applications.

Most of the devices supported here on XDA have a working toolkit–a handy tool that usually allow rooting, installing applications through ADB, unlocking bootloader, and so on. XDA Forum Member tdiddy.2 has made a multi-platform toolkit for Android Wear devices.

The project is at an early development stage, but can already reboot the device to bootloader, recovery, and system. Users are able to take a screenshot through the ADB. And last but not least, users can also install a single or multiple applications via ADB. Hopefully, the list of supported features will soon grow, and Android Wear users will be able to perform advanced operations.

The main advantage of this tool is its multi-platform compatibility. The tool is written in Java, so you are able to run it on every OS with Java Runtime Environment installed.

If you are a happy owner of any Android Wear device such as the G Watch or Gear Live, head over to the AWToolkit thread to put your hands on the toolkit for your  tiny device.

G Watch Toolkit

The LG G Watch is one of the first two devices hitting the market rocking the highly anticipated Android Wear OS. Naturally, many folks have snatched one up to get a taste of what Google’s take on wearables would be like. And so if you’re one of these people, and especially if you’re a new owner of the G Watch, what better way to kick things off than with LG G Watch Tool?

Developed by XDA Recognized Developer Tomsgt, LG G Watch Tool is a toolkit which prepares your G Watch for aftermarket development and modification with a host of useful functions. This includes:

  • Unlocking the bootloader
  • Relocking the bootloader
  • Flashing stock recovery
  • Flashing stock boot image
  • Restoring the device if bricked
  • Rooting the G watch
  • Installing and testing necessary drivers

The toolkit is compatible with PCs running Windows, Linux and iOS, and Tomsgt has also provided a handy video tutorial for those who may be trying this out for the first time. Also, for those who may have a slow internet connection or very limited bandwidth, it should be noted that the toolkit is quite large in size, coming in at about 135 MB.

If you would like to kick things off the right way, head over to the LG G Watch toolkit thread to get started.

OPO

The OnePlus One is one appealing device. With gorgeous industrial design, top notch specifications, and an unbelievably affordable price tag, it’s with no surprise that many of us are itching for a purchase invite, or even better yet, for the phone to be released to the wider market. And it’s certainly not hurting their cause by sponsoring xda:devcon ’14. Those who are lucky enough to claim a OnePlus One as their own, especially recent owners, may want to check out the OnePlus One Easy Toolkit.

Developed by XDA Senior Member scumpicule, this toolkit is especially useful for new OnePlus One owners looking to get their phone set up with the necessary software for customization and development. Functions that are able to be performed include:

  • Unlock the bootloader
  • Install and boot TWRP 2.7.1.0 and 2.7.0.0
  • Install and boot Philz recovery
  • Install and boot CWM
  • Install and boot the original recovery
  • Install the official CyanogenMod 11S firmware

In order to access these features bar the bootloader unlock, it is required for you to unlock the device’s bootloader first. So if you haven’t done this yet, make sure to perform this first with the toolkit before continuing.

If you would like to get started setting up your new OnePlus One, be sure to check out the OnePlus One Easy Toolkit at its original thread for more information.

Samsung-Galaxy-S3-S-3-Repair-Fix-Cracked-Screen-Glass-Miami-Aventura-Fort-Lauderdale-Phone-Techs

Occasionally, the situation arises when our cell phone screens die completely. Be it due to a nasty fall, playing a bit too rough with other items in your pocket or backpack, or other device trauma, these things unfortunately happen from time to time. We hope that you never have to experience this rather unpleasant situation, but if it does ever happen, we might have a solution for you that will enable you to control your device in order to extract its data.

If your touchscreen doesn’t respond, some would assume that their data is lost. However, there are various ways to connect to your device and retrieve your data. XDA Forum Member k.janku1 created a handy tool for Windows users that allows you to control your device using a mouse and on-screen buttons. Your device’s screen is shown in a small window, which gives you a way to copy your texts, gallery or anything else that happens to be stored somewhere in phone’s memory. As you would expect, in order to run this tool, your Android-powered phone or tablet needs to have USB debugging turned on. The app then handles the rest.

Do you have a broken screen and do you need to still access your device? If so, all you need to do is head over to the original thread and give this tool a try.

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ADB is the most basic and in many circumstances, one of the most powerful Android debugging tools available. With ADB, one can easily install an app, flash your favorite ROM, or grab a logcat to help developers. ADB has one major disadvantage to newcomers, though, and that’s command line.

Command line is great for scripting, and practically every advanced user becomes or already is quite comfortable, but not everyone can remember various lengthy commands. Luckily, XDA Senior Member Mohamed Hashem created a tool for newcomers and people who like simplicity.

With Mohamed Hashem’s tool, you can pull a logcat, install or uninstall applications, reboot your device to a selected mode, and more. It can also flash a recovery, kernel, or ROM using fastboot. The fact that it’s written in Java makes it multi-platform, and as such, it can be used on Windows, Linux, and OS X. Mahmed Hashem’s tool is a great way to show the true potential of ADB to new users who don’t know much about ADB, fastboot, and command line in general.

If you are new to Android or simply want to have things automated, make your way to the original thread to give this tool a try.

ASC_Build

To install any ROM through a custom recovery, you need to have an updater-script. It’s basically a few lines of commands that tells your Android recovery what to do. These files are also widely used with Aroma Installer and other scripting engines, but of course everyone knows this already. However, a problem arises when you need to create your own updater-script from scratch, as it’s not always generated during the build process.

For beginners, the updater-script language (Edify) might be like black magic. Thankfully, there are some tools that can help out with basic commands such as a GUI-based utility by XDA Forum Member Octanium91 (posted thanks to courtesy of XDA Forum Member borndead) called Android Script Creator that allows you to create an updater-script with just a few clicks.

Android Script Creator does all the dirty work for you. All you need to do is select which option should be added to your current updater-script. Every option is presented through a simple dropdown menu that explains all of the commands. The generated script can then be used with a ROM, application, mod, or practically anything that can be flashed through a custom recovery.

If you are a beginner trying to get through complicated Edify scripting, head over to the tool thread to get started.

9NA8aPm

With a much certainty, we can say that Aroma is one of the most widely used projects here on XDA. We have talked about it countless times in the past. This system was created by XDA Recognized Developer amarullz, and it has since dramatically changed how we install ROMs, kernels, and flashable modifications by allowing us to select which applications, libraries, and boot animations we would like to have installed. It’s almost a given that everyone reading this has already seen a thread with the word AROMA in the title.

Aroma is a great tool, but can be little problematic when you are using it for the first time. Aroma beginners should try out tool made by XDA Senior Member Madaditya. Lazy Aroma is a Windows batch script that helps you begin Aroma more easily. With this script, you can perform such actions like building the initial Aroma windows, adding some comments and information, and even creating the updater-script that launches the Aroma window during installation. To try out Aroma with your personal project, you need to have it on your PC and let the script do its magic.

If you are a developer looking to give your users more freedom, visit the tool thread and give Lazy Aroma a try.

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