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Posts Tagged: tutorial

CLCRl

XDA-Developers is all about learning and sharing the knowledge with others. It doesn’t matter if it’s knowledge on installing an application or hacking the bootloader; knowledge is priceless.

Not too long ago, we talked about a guide to making your own Flappy game clone. Making a game is a challenge, but it’s within range of even so called newcomers. However, it certainly takes ambition and determination to achieve your goals. If you prefer spoken word to written, you should definitely watch a series on game making by XDA Forum Member evh98.

Evh98 recorded 50 videos, in which he describes the complicated and long process of creating a game. During the session, evh98 teaches you Java and the LibGDX library in order to create a 2D game. Just be sure to keep it away from birds, pipes, and other rather addictive elements. If you already know how to code, the author suggests that you start from video 21, where the game making process begins.

For more information regarding the project, please go to the original thread. There, you can find links to YouTube channel with tutorial. We all hope that one day you will present your game here on XDA boards.

sony-xperia-s

If you’ve been thinking of developing your first custom ROM for your Sony Xperia device, chances are that you probably need a kernel to go along with it, especially if the ROM is for devices with locked bootloaders. Because of this, it’s sometimes best to know how to extract the kernel from an FTF file in order to integrate it into your ROM.

A great place to begin with would be a tutorial by XDA Recognized Contributor matt4321 and XDA Recognized Contributor and Themer DaRk-L0rD. Divided into two parts, the tutorial first guides you through the steps of extracting a kernel from an FTF file and converting it into a boot.img file. The second part teaches you how to make a flashable ZIP package containing your freshly extracted boot.img file.

Additionally, because the kernel is located in different partitions in different Xperia devices, DaRk-L0rD also includes a handy list of just where you can find the kernel for your particular Xperia device. Just keep in mind, however, that not all Xperia devices are on the list at this time, so DaRk-L0rD also provides a simple way of finding out the directory yourself.

If you would like to find out more, check out the original thread for more information.

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Flappy_Bird_hard

What’s the most popular mobile game since the days of Angry Birds? The answer is obviously Flappy Bird. This addictive game has seen so many remixes, that you were able to flap the Doge, Pou, and almost everything in between. The game’s developer had his 15 minutes of fame, and many others have created entertaining clones as a result..

Since Flappy Birds is so successful, why not try making a clone yourself? It’s possible, and there are some great guides to help you do so, such as the one written by XDA Forum Member VOS. The tutorial shows how to make a Flappy Bird clone using Basic4Android and LibGDX.

Admittedly, the steps aren’t short, but it’s definitely a great way to learn how to create a simple game, making it a perfect starting point for beginning game developers. The guide itself is very detailed and describes every stage of game creation, along with the required code resources and graphics.

If you always wanted to crate your own game, you now have the perfect occasion to try. It’s not easy and will require a few somewhat advanced programming techniques. But with a bit of effort and patience, you will make your own, hopefully even more successful game. You can find more information in the original thread.

rootgear

In this episode, XDA Developer TV Producer TK shows you how to root your Samsung Galaxy Gear. The Galaxy Gear and smartwatches in general are hot news in the Android ecosystem. The Galaxy Gear is the device responsible for mainstreaming smartwatches. And as usual at XDA, we must root all the things, and our buddy the Galaxy Gear is no exception!

TK presents step-by-step instructions on how to gain root access on your Galaxy Gear using tools from the XDA Developers Forums. First, TK shows you how to gain root access using XDA Forum Member photonicgeek’s guide. Then, he installs the Xposed framework, GravityBox and other modules. If you wanted to root your Galaxy Gear, take a moment and check this video out.

READ ON »

xperia-z1-compact-rooted

Custom recoveries are a big part of what happens around here at XDA. Having one relieves you of the manual work that you would otherwise have to do when flashing mods, themes, ROMs, kernels, and the like. Custom recoveries also serve as an important safety net for when things go wrong, since you can easily reflash your ROM or restore a backup. So when you’re cooking up a fresh custom ROM from scratch, it’s important to make sure that your users have a custom ROM to flash from. If not, you should consider integrating one into the building process so that they don’t have to install one separately.

If you’re thinking of building your own custom ROM for a Sony Xperia device and are interested in how to go about integrating a custom recovery, XDA Recognized Themer and Contributor DaRk-L0rD has written a great tutorial that you may want to check out. You must be using Android Kitchen to build your ROM, know how to edit an updater-script using Notepad++, and have the ‘working’ folder of your ROM and flashable ZIP package of the custom recovery of your choice. After laying down these requirements, DaRk-LorD dives straight into the steps of the process, with plenty of screenshots and examples of code to aid you along the way.

So before you head off creating your own custom ROM, check out the guide thread and consider integrating a custom recovery into your Xperia device ROM.

LG-G2-Android-4.4-KitKat-update

Not too long ago, we covered Android 4.4.2 KitKat making its way to the LG G2—or at least to the T-Mobile variant. Before it was available as an OTA, it came as a massive 1.5 GB KDZ file, the file type LG uses for their ROMs, much like Sony Xperia’s FTF and Motorola’s SBF files.

One of the disadvantages with receiving an update this way is that there is only one way to install such ROM files. And in LG’s case, that’s with the LG Mobile Support Tool. So if you’re unable to install the KitKat update using the aforementioned method, or you’d rather install the update another way, such as with the more flexible method of flashing the ROM through a custom recovery, XDA Senior Member somboons has created a guide that you may want to check out.

The process explained in the tutorial essentially allows you to create a flashable ZIP package from any Android 4.4.2 update for the LG G2, regardless of device variant, and root the ROM right after you flash it. This means you can update your device by simply flashing the ZIP package from your sd card, share it online or with someone who may not have access to the LG Mobile Support Tool, or quickly and easily wipe and refresh your device without having to be bound to a PC. And for those who would rather have some visual guidance, somboons has also created a video tutorial going through the entire process.

If you would like to find out more ,visit the original thread for more information.

galaxy-mega-i9152-dual-sim

The Samsung Galaxy Mega is the less well known sibling of the OEM’s popular Galaxy Note lineup. Announced back in April of last year, there are two main variants of the phablet, the GT-I920x with a 6.3″ screen, and the GT-I915x with a more modest 5.8″ screen—not far from the Note 3. Nevertheless, it’s a device that definitely has its appeals, such as dual-SIM support with the GT-I9152 variant, powerful specs, and wireless charging, a feature we just don’t see being adopted as much as we would like.

If you own one of these devices and would like to make a start in the modding world, XDA Forum Member sitifire wrote a useful tutorial on modding various aspects of the SystemUI on your Galaxy Mega. Sitfire confesses to also being a beginner in the modding world, and his affinity with fellow beginners shines through in the tutorial in how it’s written and structured. The guide is easy to follow, has plenty of example code, and gets straight to the point. The modifications taught are relatively simple, and although they may be achieved through existing mods, beginners will be able to get an insight into the behind the scenes of such mods.

If you would like to start laying down the foundations of your modding journey on your Galaxy Mega, be sure to check out the tutorial at its original thread for more information. Also please note that while this guide is intended for the GT-I9152, most of the tweaks can be adapted to the I920x with minor modifications.

Play-Store

It is indisputable that an almost endless selection and variety of apps is a major part of the Android platform. This has gotten so impressive that other mobile operating systems and new OEMs have decided to jump on the bandwagon by adding Android app support. We’ve now seen this with Jolla Sailfish, the once dominant Blackberry, and Nokia with their freshly announced X lineup. Hence, we totally understand your uncontrollable excitement to be part of something so awesome.

Where should you get started at and what should you do if you’re an app developing rookie who wants to create the next viral app? Well, you may want to check out XDA Senior Member Rachid.Ala’s tutorial on developing your first Android app. It’s written with the beginner in mind, teaching you how to create a very simple Android app that does nothing more than display the classic, “Hello World.” What’s important to take away from this guide are the very basics of app development, which lay the foundation to more complicated and creative apps in the future.

Rachid.Ala does a great job explaining all the tools and software required for your first Android app, including JDK, Eclipse, and the ADT plugin. Plenty of screenshots are given along the way, as well as examples of code. It should also be noted that the guide is written for Windows PC users, so if you use another PC OS, you’ll have to tweak the instructions a little.

So if you can’t wait to finally get started on your very first Android app, make your way over to the original thread for more information.

Sigma_Cube_Batt

If you’ve been looking for a more interesting battery charging animation to replace the rather dull and conventional battery icon you have now, there are a wealth of options available ranging from battery mod compilations to 3rd party apps, and even a Windows tool. But if these options just don’t seem to cut it for you and you’d rather create your own battery animation from scratch, you may want to check out XDA Recognized Contributor erikalin’s tutorial.

Because of the personalized and limitless nature of the procedure, Erikalin keeps the tutorial clean and simple. It is broken up into two parts: things you have to get, such as 7zip and Paint (or any other image editor of choice), and things you have to do. If you fancy yourself as being more of a visual learner, this has also been catered for by Erikalin, who has made a video tutorial. It can be said that the video tutorial is more thorough than the written counterpart, as it shows exactly what Erikalin did to create his own battery animation.

Before you rush and open up Windows Paint, it should be noted that you will be editing 203 very small images, a task that is both time consuming and may not be healthy for your eyes if you’re at it for extended periods of time. Nevertheless, if you’re up for the challenge and would like to get started creating your own battery charging animation for your Samsung Galaxy S 3, head over to the original thread for more information.

sview

The S View cases for the Samsung Galaxy S 4 and Note 3 are fascinating products, as they not only protect the device and its screen, but they also feature a topside screen that displays your status bar, temperature, caller ID, and date and time. Not only that, but it’s also recognizes S Pen contact on the Note 3, which allows for some simple actions such as taking notes.

What may come as a surprise to some is that the S View cases don’t allow you to change the screen timeout period, and they also offer very few options for backgrounds and no ability to set your own custom background. Luckily, XDA Forum Member vonerk has written a tutorial on how to set a custom wallpaper and timeout period.

The process can get a bit messy, but overall it is quite straightforward. The tutorial requires you to use the previously featured Android APKTool to decompile and eventually recompile the various files that need to be edited, as well as have your custom background image and Notepad++ ready for all the editing in between. It should be noted that the end result does not allow you to quickly and easily change such settings, so if you want to change them again, you’ll have to go through the whole process again.

So if you’re getting a bit bored of the background options, check out the guide at its original thread to get started.

ujube2ev

Lackluster battery life is probably one of the biggest downfalls in the modern day smartphone, despite the slow gains being made by OEMs with each passing generation. Putting aside battery saving apps and devices with non-removable batteries, one way of getting more screen time from your device is to simply use a battery with higher mAh rating. This generally means a battery with larger physical dimensions that will not only add more bulk to your device and ruin its beautiful, carefully designed aesthetics, but can also prevent you from using key features.

This is most definitely the case for the 9300 mAh Zero Lemon battery for the Samsung Galaxy Note II, which completely covers the phone’s NFC chip with its ginormous form. Naturally, users can no longer use NFC, which for many has become an integral part of their lifestyle. But thanks to the efforts of XDA Recognized Contributor Bajanman, there’s now a mod that can allow you access to the phone’s NFC again.

One must keep in mind that this modification can be very complicated, especially for anyone who is not experienced or trained in soldering. The process essentially allows contact between the NFC chip and the phone with wires wrapping around the side of the battery. Having gone through and completed the procedure himself, Bajanman documented every step of the way and provided the images as much welcomed visual aid.

This mod is definitely not for everybody, aimed obviously towards those who have the Zero Lemon battery or are seriously considering of purchasing it. If however, you would much rather keep NFC than have a larger, both in regards to dimensions and mAh, it may be an idea to check out something else. If you would like to find out more about this mod, visit the original thread for more details.

okgoogle

Google seemingly brought a bit of the future into the present when it introduced voice activation to the Nexus 5 and Moto X, something we’ve only seen to such a degree in blockbuster movies and corny TV advertisements. Naturally, the rest of the Android community probably feels a bit left out of the fun while exclaiming ‘Y U NO VOICE ACTIVATE’ at their devices. There’s good news for folks who are feeling this way because there’s now a way for you to do control your phone with your voice as well.

This comes thanks to the efforts of XDA Senior Member lukes91, who has written a tutorial teaching you how to use Xposed, Tasker, Autovoice and Google Now together to achieve a similar effect. After making it clear that the tutorial is based only off lukes91’s personal setup on his HTC One X, the tutorial continues on explaining just exactly how to configure the settings of each of the aforementioned apps. Screenshots of the apps’ settings are posted throughout the guide, and lukes91 also inserts in a few personal variations to give you the feel of just how much flexibility can be had.

By the end of the process, you’ll be able to say “OK Google” to launch Google Now and other actions on your device, even when the screen is off. Of course, with such functionality, you should be prepared for some increased battery drain, with the significance varying from device to device.

If you’ve been wanting to have this function on your device, head over to the original thread to get started.

2epsgg2.jpg

Tweaking CPU settings can be a very safe and easy way for rooted Android users to save a bit of that precious battery juice. More often than not, this can only be achieved by downloading a third party app, as only very few OEMs offer CPU speed controls in their built-in software. But if you own a Sony Xperia device and are up for a bit of coding, check out XDA Senior Member Pandemic’s tutorial on adding CPU settings into the native settings menu.

The process explained in the tutorial is very straightforward with not many complexities, perfect for the beginner looking to dip his or her toes in the pool but not yet ready to dive into the deep end of Android development. After downloading the attached files from the guide, you need decompile the settings.apk, navigate to the specified XML files which you then must add a few lines of code to, and recompile it. Once this is done, all you have to do is either make a flashable zip folder with the two APKs provided and the edited settings.apk and flash it through a custom recovery, or simply push these files manually to the system folder.

When you’re done, you’ll end up with a settings menu that has a new sub menu that enables you to change the CPU clock speeds, as well as view statistics regarding your device’s CPU such as the total run time and how long your CPU spends running at certain clock speeds.

If you would like to give this a whirl, visit the original thread for more information.

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