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Posts Tagged: TWRP

MotoQTWRP

Last month, we brought you news about Team Win’s baby, the recovery known as TWRP. Back then, it had been just updated to version 2.4 and it included a bunch of new features and stability improvements. Everyone was happy, but as the old saying goes, there is always room for improvement. So with that in mind, and considering that our devs do not like to sit still, the recovery created by XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy and team has kept evolving. The newest and most stable version is now 2.4.2.0, and it is looking more and more like a UI that you would find while inside the Android environment. The new version comes loaded with many surprises and a special guest appearance from XDA Elite Recognized Developer Chainfire.

So, what is included in this version of TWRP you ask? Well, for starters, several devices have been given the gift of controlling the screen brightness, so you can indulge in some heavy flashing without waking up your significant other. Also, the recovery now allows your screen to turn off after 60 seconds of inactivity. This last feature is a fantastic way to preserve the life of your battery and screen as well, so for those of you who only flashed with a charger connected because you are afraid that the screen will drain your battery, you no longer have to worry about that being an issue. There are also many improvements for backups, especially for to exFAT. Dees_Troy cleaned code and made adjustments that result in this process being much faster than before. Last but not least, TWRP now offers the option to check for root AND inject SuperSU if you don’t have it. In other words, this recovery now offers a complete set of options that makes most other manual processes obsolete. This is a great option for those who prefer to stick with stock ROMs but only want root without having to go through the hassle of pushing the su binary by themselves.

As always, the recovery is a work in progress and even though the devs test things thoroughly, there is the off chance that you may run into some bugs. If you do, please follow the dev’s guidelines and report them to their github bug tracker since it is very complicated to follow bugs on so many threads across XDA. Having said that, feedback is always appreciated, so don’t forget to leave it there in the threads as well.

Team Win Recovery Project 2.x, or twrp2 for short, is a custom recovery built with ease of use and customization in mind. It’s a fully touch driven user interface – no more volume rocker or power buttons to mash. The GUI is also fully XML driven and completely theme-able. You can change just about every aspect of the look and feel.

You can find more information in the master thread including links to device specific threads.

[Thanks jerdog for the tip!]

Jordan0201

A change to the DMCA law has forsaken the cell phone market. This and more is covered in this episode, as Jordan reviews all the important stories from this week.  Jordan also talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV: XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviewed SPenBoard Switcher, and XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler had fun tearing down the Oppo Find 5.

Jordan talks about CyanogenMod 10.1 being official on the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1. Additionally, this week Jordan talks about the 2.4 release of TWRP. Pull up a chair and check out this video. Finally, be sure to check out all the other news from XDA-Developers.com

READ ON »

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MotoQTWRP

Regardless of what the US Government and the PAC behemoth CTIA would have you believe, choice is a good thing in the wireless industry. And when it comes to having choices for different types of software you want to run on your devices, it is a great thing. TWRP (TeamWin Recovery Project) is one of those options for recovery on many different types of devices, with over 80 being officially supported at this time.

TeamWin has been very supportive of the community, from providing instructions on how to build TWRP for devices they don’t officially support, to actively participating in online and forum discussions assisting users with the usage and porting of TWRP. Their source code is completely open source and doesn’t require that you purchase an app in order to utilize the OpenRecovery scripting functionality, unlike other options available.

As of late, they have been hard at work adding various features that add value and continue to set TWRP apart from the other recoveries. Version 2.4.0.0 brings with it new features like using libtar instead of busybox’s tar implementation for better backup options, exFAT sdcard support, decryption of Samsung TouchWiz encrypted devices, updated ADB sideload functionality, and much more. You can view their site for a full list of supported devices or visit some of the device-specific threads below:

If you spot an official TWRP thread that we’ve left out, please let us know, and we’ll promptly add it in!

twrecov tablet

We’ve made a fair amount of noise about TWRP (Team Win Recovery Project) here on the Portal, and with good reason. It’s been ported to a wide array of devices, from the Sprint Galaxy Note 2 to the ever present mobile geriatric that is the HTC Hero. Now it’s available to owners of the brand spanking new Nexus 10. I personally can’t think of a better way to celebrate the arrival of your new device by slapping a custom recovery on there.

This particular port of the increasingly popular recovery option is brought to us courtesy of XDA Recognised Developer Dees_Troy, lead developer of TWRP, and includes all the features you would expect to find. And because it’s based on the latest version (2.3.2.2), it fixes an issue with ADB in recovery and enables USB OTG capabilities. There is however a slight issue with the theme. Due to the high resolution of the Nexus 10, the recovery requires some upscaling and won’t quite fill the entire screen. This is purely aesthetic though, and does not affect functionality in any way.

Installation can be accomplished via either the good old fashioned way of fastboot flash recovery or by simply installing the Goo Manager app and selecting the install recovery option if you’re already rooted. Take a look at the development thread for all the details.

handphone

The HTC Explorer was never one of the most popular smartphones to grace the pages of XDA. The Explorer is a low end device that was released in late 2011. With only a 600 MHz processor and 512 MB RAM, it was never  going to grab any headlines. This is what makes the recent high level of development activity on the device all the more impressive.

First up, XDA Senior Member oblikas brings us TWRP. The popular touchscreen driven recovery system allows you to do much more than flash a ROM. While it does work as intended, at version 2.2.2.0, it’s not updated to the latest version at the time of writing.

Next up, XDA Senior Member derefas has managed to port HTC Sense 4.0 to the Explorer. Given that the device originally shipped with Sense 3.5, this is an exciting port for Explorer owners, giving their device a complete refresh. The only listed known issues with the ROM are occasional USB issues, Bluetooth, Wifi and Superuser, though these last three issues have been fixed by the dev and will be working in the next ROM update.

Further to this, XDA Senior Member sam_0829 has impressively ported Sense 4.1 to the device, using the HTC Desire HD as a donor. The main functional parts of the device such as radio, sound and camera are all working, but as the Desire HD has a much higher screen resolution, a large amount of the ROM needs to be re-sized to fit the Explorer’s 320 × 480 screen. The dev has created a thread in the hope that others will be able to provide help in re-sizing, so that a usable ROM can be put together.

If Sense isn’t your cup of tea, and you prefer a more true Android experience, there are a number of ROMs available that are more suited.

XDA Senior Member sakindia123 has been busy, and brings us unofficial builds of both Cyanogenmod 9.1 and 10.  The Ice Cream Sandwich based Cyanogenmod 9.1 ROM is fully functional with no known issues.  The Cyanogenmod 10 ROM is almost completely working, with the only issues being with video decoding and voice search.

Another non Sense option is an unofficial AOKP ROM, built from source by XDA Recognized Developer flowish. This ROM has no known issues and of course has all the standard AOKP features.

Finally, if you haven’t been hiding under that rock of late, you’ll no doubt have heard of PACman ROM, an amalgamation of the best features from Paranoid Android, AOKP and Cyanogenmod 10. This port of PACman ROM is brought to us, again, by XDA Senior Member oblikas. Given the ROM has only just been released and is in an alpha stage, there are a few issues at present, including the camera, audio and USB mass storage.

There are of course many other custom ROMs available in the HTC Explorer Development forum. This article is just intended to highlight some of the more recent development taking place.

If you want to try out any of these ROMs, check out the relevant ROM thread:

TWRP can be found in the TWRP development thread.
twrecov

You’ve probably heard of TeamWin Recovery Project (TWRP) by now. We’ve mentioned it here on the XDA Portal a few times in the past, and it’s quickly becoming one of the most popular recovery options available for a rather large selection of devices, both old and new. And when you look at what it’s capable of, it’s easy to understand why. One of the latest devices to receive a port of this feature packed recovery is the Sprint Galaxy Note II thanks to XDA Recognised Developer bigbiff who released version 2.3 of TWRP. Some features of TWRP include:

  • Based on AOSP sources.
  • Completely touch based.
  • Completely themeable.
  • Ability to compress backups.
  • Ability to select which partitions to backup and restore.
  • Fixing permissions takes seconds, not minutes.
  • Many, many more.

On top of all this, the recovery itself is fully open source, giving people the opportunity to create builds for unsupported devices as they see fit. TeamWin states that they are looking for talented developers and themers to help with this project. Links to the source are available in thread, along with instructions on how to go about theming TWRP.

If you’re interested in finding out more about TWRP, check out the original thread for more info.

RAsb

Back in 2003, a group of mobile device enthusiasts decided to create a community where other like-minded enthusiasts and developers could come together, share ideas, and learn to take their devices to new heights. Now, almost 10 years later, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has continued that mantra.

For the unfamiliar, Dees_Troy is part of Team Win, which is responsible for such projects as TwinPic 3D, Kernel Manager,  Fr3vo, HDMwIn, and WiMax in CM7. Even with past successes, the team is probably best known for the Team Win Recovery Project, aka TWRP. TWRP is a unique project, providing touch and recovery-theming functionality to a historically mundane recovery experience. It has been ported to countless devices, allowing many more users to experience the joy of selecting what they want to do without using the volume keys and other combinations to select items to flash.

Not only has Dees_Troy made sure that the TWRP source is public (read: open-source) but he has also put together a very handy guide to compiling TWRP for your device. He does include a nice little note before you get started:

All of TWRP 2.x source is public. You can compile it on your own. This guide isn’t going to be a step-by-step, word-for-word type of guide. If you’re not familiar with basic Linux commands then you probably won’t be able to do this.

It’s a very valid warning, given that the process to compile correctly and then edit the corresponding files and such is not for the faint of heart, and can quite possibly result in an irreversible situation like a bricked device or a loss of data. That said, the guide walks you through compiling CM7/9/10 and then setting up TWRP for your specific device before beginning to compile.

If you’re interested in joining in on the fun, visit the guide thread first for more information.

 

TWRP

The last time we brought you news about TWRP, it was to announce that TWRP 2.2.2 had been released. It had fixed a lot of bugs from the initial release of TWRP 2.2 and added a few new features. Very recently, TWRP has been updated again to version 2.3.

There were a whole bunch of awesome improvements with TWRP 2.2 and a lot of unique and brand new features as well. TWRP 2.3 promises no less. The official change log includes:

Rebased onto AOSP Jelly Bean source code
Rewrote backup, restore, wipe, and mount code in C++ classes for easier maintenance going forward
NOTE: backups from prior versions of TWRP are still compatible with 2.3
ADB sideload functionality from AOSP is included in 2.3, see this link for more info
Re-wrote fix permissions entirely in C++ and runs in a few seconds instead of a few minutes (thanks to bigbiff)
Improvements to zip finding in OpenRecoveryScript (should be a lot fewer GooManager automation issues)
Faster boot times
Added charging indicator while in recovery (only updates once every 60 seconds)

Additionally, XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy has reported that there is now support for spaces in backup names. Before, if you added a space to the name of a backup, it would not restore. Now users can use whatever naming convention they want.

One of the biggest changes, though, is all of the TWRP being rewritten in C++ and its move to recovery API 3 instead of API 2. With the code rewrite, it will allow TWRP to update more quickly and with more stability. With the API 3 change, it means that some flashable zip files may stop working because the developer needs to update the update-binary. If you don’t want to wait for the developer, or the developer has ceased working on the project, you can find one to use on TWRP’s official website. To install the latest TWRP, you can use the Goomanager application. Simply open the application, hit menu, and install open recovery.

If you want to check out the latest TWRP recovery for your device, check one of the links below.

HTC Hero Receives TWRP Port

September 25, 2012   By:

TWRP-Hero

The HTC Hero seems to be one of those HTC device that never completely loses it’s following. A few weeks ago, we reported on the HTC Hero receiving both Jelly Bean and Ice Cream Sandwich ports.  To further back this up, we can report that the Hero has also received a TWRP (Team Win Recovery Project) port. In fact two developers have thrown their hat into the ring.

XDA Recognized Contributor jordfaz has ported TWRP 2.2.2.0 to the Hero. The popular “touch” recovery has been on fire of late, being ported to a large number of devices. The only stand out issue with this particular port is that the “reboot to recovery” option from the ROM doesn’t work. Everything else is working as it should. XDA Senior Member kemoba has ported a more recent version of TWRP, 2.2.2.1 to the Hero. At the time of writing, only a couple of very minor issues exists:

  • When installing ROM or making backup if text goes over screen recovery doesn’t go into new line
  • Formatting takes ages, if you don’t want to wait go to settings and check use rm -rf instead of format, it should give you the same effect

In the good old XDA way, both jordfaz and kemoba are working together on fixing a number of minor issues for future releases.

If you want to get the ever popular TWRP on your Hero, check out jordfaz’s thread or kemoba’s thread.

TWRP 2.2.2 Android Recovery

Team Win Recovery Project was recently updated to bring several improvements and bug fixes to the popular custom recovery. For those unfamiliar, TWRP is a custom recovery with an impressive touch-based GUI that packs quite a punch and makes recovery operations a flash, no pun intended.

TWRP is officially available for dozens of Android devices, and is quickly becoming the custom recovery solution of choice for many enthusiasts. It is an open source project and utilizes the open source Open Recovery Script, which Team Win created.

This is the third update to TWRP in the recent months, after 2.1 and 2.2 that we previously featured. According to the official changelog, the changes made in this 2.2.2 update include:

  • Significantly improved sd-ext handling (ext partitions on sdcards)
  • Changes to kinetic scrolling in file selectors
  • Fixed a problem with using periods in backup names
  • Fixed problems in XML layouts with mounting system and USB storage
  • Fixed a problem with unmounting a partition before formatting during restore
  • Add Jelly Bean decrypt support
  • Updated 320×480 theme to match others (thanks to Llewelyn)
  • Improve “symlinking” of /data/media to either /sdcard or /emmc
  • Added sanitizing of device IDs for invalid characters (thanks to bigbiff)
  • Fixed free space calculation when switching backup devices on /data/media devices
  • Fixed a problem with using OpenRecoveryScript to create a backup without providing a backup name

Want to grab TWRP 2.2.2 for your device? Head over to the appropriate forum thread link below for your device:

You can also install TWRP 2.2.2 directly to your device using GooManager or download it from the TWRP website, where it may be available for more devices than listed above.

TWRP for LG Optimus One P500

Do you have an LG Optimus One P500, and are you looking for an extremely flashy custom recovery? You’re in luck, as TWRP recovery is now available for the Optimus One.

For those unfamiliar, TWRP stands for Team Win Recovery Project. It’s an open source recovery for Android devices that offers an advanced touch-based UI and Open Recovery Script support, as well as several other features not offered in other recoveries.

This port comes courtesy of XDA Senior Member Ron G, and based on the user response, it is working virtually bug-free on the device. Installation is as simple as flashing the provided file from your existing recovery.

You can find more information, the complete feature list and the download link in the forum thread.

TWRP

When a device is first rooted, it usually doesn’t take very long for a custom recovery to appear as well. In many cases, root and recovery are released simultaneously. Of course, sometimes it takes a little longer than usual to get something working on a device and thus users may have root but no easy way to install things like custom ROMs, custom kernels, or modifications that could make the device even better. For Samsung Galaxy S Advance owners, after a long, long wait, you now have a custom recovery.

XDA Forum Member diego-ch, along with the help of other developers, has released a kernel that also packs the latest TeamWin Recovery Project recovery on it. As with most Samsung devices, the way to install the kernel is through either Odin or Heimdall. A word of warning: Installing the kernel will increase your flash counter. Aside from having a functional custom recovery, the kernel also adds CIFS support. If you’re a Galaxy S Advance owner and you’ve been looking to flash some easily, check out the original thread.

[Thanks to XDA Recognized Contributor varun.chitre15 for the tip!]

filemanagerrenam

Just about three months ago, we brought you news that the Team Win Recovery Project had received a massive update to version 2.1. April’s release largely heralded the start of a new age in recoveries—where one would no longer have to deal with cumbersome menus, instead interacting with a very user-friendly GUI.

It wasn’t simply about the GUI either. In addition to bringing an unrivaled level of UI polish, TWRP 2.1 offered users many advanced features such as update.zip queuing, a basic file manager, and dual storage support for Nandroid backups. Additionally, TWRP added support for the open source scripting engine OpenRecoveryScript, which works in conjunction with the previously covered GooManager.

How do you follow up something as revolutionary as TWRP 2.1? With TWRP 2.2, of course. That’s how! The new release builds on the previous offering by delivering many recovery “firsts.” For starters, this is the first recovery to feature on on-screen keyboard. Why would you want such a thing? How about naming and renaming Nandroid backups! TWRP 2.2 is also the only recovery to split extremely large backups, allowing users to backup and restore /data partitions larger than the 2 GB FAT32 file size limit.

In the words of XDA Recognized Developer Dees_Troy:

- On-screen keyboard in recovery! — supports long press, backspace repeat, and swipe left deletes everything left of the cursor
– Name new backups and rename existing backups
– Rename files and folders in the file manager
– Pseudo-terminal emulator
– Support decrypting an encrypted data partition on Galaxy Nexus (enter password using keyboard)
– Backup archive splitting — allows backup and restore of data partitions larger than 2GB
– Simplified XML layout support between resolutions
– Added dual storage selection radio buttons to zip install, backup, and restore pages
– Improved zip install compatibility
– Updated update-binary source code
– Numerous small bug fixes and improvements

Eager to get started? I know I am. Head to the links below to obtain the appropriate version for your device:

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