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Posts Tagged: Windows 8

Jordan0603

Get started with Windows 8 development with a handy tutorial. That and more are covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this week. Included in this week’s news is an article about connecting certain Samsung devices via USB Mass Storage protocol and adding a physical camera button to your Sony Xperia Z.

Jordan talks about the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer Jayce released a video on salary negotiation tips and tricks, which was followed up with a video on tips and tricks for the toughest job interview questions. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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WindowsRT

One of the main limitations of Windows RT is that most 32- and 64-bit applications aren’t compatible. Therefore, if you are buying a Microsoft Surface and intend to install all your favorite Windows programs, then you’re going to have a bad time. To remedy this issue, XDA Recognized Developer GoodDayToDie has begun an initiative to get some desktop apps compiled for RT users.

So far the initiative has gotten attention from a number of users and developers. To begin with, everyone has been focusing on re-compiling free, open source software to work on Windows RT. Here is the current list of applications that have been ported already:

Bochs. x86 Emulator. Known issue: no network support.
TightVNC. VNC server and client.
PuTTY Suite. SSH/Rsh/telnet client and helpers. Printing fixed in this build.
7-Zip. Utility for file archives and disk images.
Notepad++. Powerful but simple text/code editor. New direct link:
SciTE. Code editor (Thanks to XDA-Devs member FearTheCowboy)
IP Messenger. Peer-to-peer chat/file transfer.
Unikey 3.1. Vietnamese character entry tool. This version is out of date, but is the latest with full source code available.
Unikey 3.6. Known issue: without RtfIO, the “Toolkit” and “Conversion on the fly” features won’t work. (Thanks minhtuan99bk)
CrystalBoy. Nintendo Gameboy emulator. Known issue: uses GDI+ instead of DirectX, may reduce performance. Reported issue: JIT is broken so games don’t actually play (unconfirmed). Thanks to DXA-Developers member daveoggy.

In addition to working on the porting, GoodDayToDie is also keeping a running list of applications that work without modification. These include Mouse Without Borders and Keepass Portable. This is a great initiative by everyone involved, and it continues the great development currently in progress for Windows 8 and RT. Also, do check back on the list frequently, as both lists are sure to grow.

For more details, check out the original thread.

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Jordan114

How to increase touch screen responsiveness on the Microsoft Surface is one of the stories from this weekend on XDA-Developers. Also, you can calibrate Windows 8 touch screens with more accuracy. However, other news items happened this weekend. XDA News Specialist Jordan covers some of those stories. He talks about cleaning bloatware and adding some Android 4.2 apps with PalaTool.

In XDA news, Jordan talks about his Huawei Ascend Mate Hands-on video. Also, Jordan mentions securing Android devices with SecDriod. Finally, all in one toolkits were released for the HTC Explorer, Desire V and Desire S.  Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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calibrate

Despite not being an actual mobile OS, Windows 8 has seen a surprising amount of development here at XDA. Whether it’s because of the Windows App Store or the Microsoft Surface is uncertain, but users and developers alike have been adding some great content for Windows 8 users. There is now a tutorial that will allow for more than four calibration points on touch screen devices running Windows 8.

XDA Senior Member young blade posted the tutorial for a number of screen resolutions. Users who use it will be able to break free from the usual four points to as many as 150 points. As young blade explains:

4a) As mine touchscreen is 22″ 1680×1050 I calculated the folowing line to get 150 calibration touch points:
4b) If your screen resolution is 1280×800 and you want 36 calibration see the following line:

There is support for other resolutions as well, but anything below 1280×800 requires a little additional work on the part of the user. None of it is overly difficult, and most of it takes place in the command prompt. Once done, however, the touch screen should be easier to use—especially for older applications not optimized with larger touch targets.

For the full tutorial, check out the original thread.

QGXnL

While some have many bad things to say about Windows 8, others are doing what they can to make the experience more enjoyable for everyone. Thus, Windows 8 has received an unnaturally healthy amount of development from XDA community members and developers, despite not being a mobile OS. One limitation is that Microsoft doesn’t allow use of most of the Win32 API. There is now a way around that.

The workaround was written by XDA Recognized Developer mamaich, a known legend whose development here dates back to 2004 when he overclocked the successor to our namesake, the XDA2. Here is mamaich’s more in depth explanation:

As we know, MS prohibits using most of standard Win32 API in Windows Store applications. Obviously there are lots of ways to overcome this limit and to call any API you like, if you are not going to publish your app on Windows Store. And here is one of them.
Idea is really simple and rather old (lots of viruses use it): search for kernel32.dll base in memory, then parse its exports for LoadLibraryA and GetProcAddress, call them – and get profit.
Writing here so this post can be indexed by google.

So far, users have reported that the hack works quite well. It’s been tested on x86, x64, and ARM processors, and is confirmed working on all of them. There are still some limitations with official Metro apps, but this does help open possibilities quite a bit. To learn more, head over to the original thread.

original

Since SSDs are becoming increasingly affordable and commonplace, computer enthusiasts have been adding them to their computers in greater frequency. And for those who dare, RAIDed configurations yield even more insane speeds (albeit without TRIM on all but a handful of SSD and chipset combinations). However, because they are still somewhat expensive, most buy smaller SSDs and a larger storage HDD. With the release of Windows 8, came the Windows App Store. This by default installs Metro Apps to the main drive. This can fill up a SSD rather quickly, and now there is a method to get around it.

XDA Recognized Developer GoodDayToDie has written up a tutorial on how users can get Metro Apps to install to a different hard drive so that the SSD doesn’t have to hold all of those apps. Initially, it was an answer to a question asked by XDA Senior Member trettet.

The method isn’t time consuming or very difficult. Fans of the command prompt should have no trouble whatsoever. Because Windows 8 doesn’t give users the option to choose which drive to install apps to, users have to create a symlink. They copy the original Metro Apps folder to the other hard drive, delete the old one on the C Drive, then create a symlink to the newly copied folder on the other hard drive. From then on, Metro Apps should be installed on the other drive.

For all the instructions, check out the original thread.

xdawindows8

Windows 8 packs a lot of differences from Windows 7. The absent start menu is perhaps the most noticeable, and many consider it to be a misstep for those not lucky enough to be on a touch screen device. However, one of the better features of Windows 8 is the incorporation of an app store, which allows users to more easily obtain applications in a manner similar to Android, Mac OS, iOS, and of course most distros of Linux. Now, there is an app for Windows 8 devices that gives you quick access to the latest and greatest on the XDA Portal.

XDA Forum Member kuartz developed a quick and simple application that gives Windows 8 users quick access to the latest content on the XDA Portal. It goes without saying that this is one of our favorite Windows 8 apps developed so far (wink, wink). It really is a pretty simple application that’s easy to use. It is important to note, however, that this third-party and not an official XDA app.

To install, users simply enter the Windows App Store, find the application and install it. A tile gets automatically placed on the start menu. Then, users can click on the icon and the latest articles and XDA TV videos will be right there for your enjoyment. Click on one of the article tiles and it’ll open right up in the app. So far, the only bug found has been that XDA TV videos aren’t viewable like they are in web browsers. So if you see a video you gotta see, just head to the Portal itself to view them.

For a link to the app in the Windows Market and for more details, check out the original thread.

snessurface

Android has enjoyed a myriad of emulators for quite some time now. There are emulators for SNES, NES, Genesis, PlayStation, N64, and many more. With the release of Windows 8 RT, developers have a chance to introduce the emulator goodness all over again. Microsoft Surface owners can now get their hands on a SNES emulator.

XDA Forum Member Vdek has posted about a SNES emulator found on the Windows Store. Here is the brief description and feature list from the Windows Store:

Description
Snes8x is a Super Nintendo emulator for Windows 8 and Windows RT. The app is based on Snes9x, a free and portable SNES emulator.
Features
Play Super Nintendo games
Support for virtual touch controls and keyboard input

If you were a SNES buff and you own the Microsoft Surface, prepare to go hunting for ROMs because now you can play your old favorites all over again. Also in the app description, it mentions support for ARM, x86, and x86-64 instruction sets. So if you’d like to try this out on a laptop or desktop running Windows 8, you can go right ahead.

For the Windows Store link, discussion, and additional info, check out the original thread.

Jordan1203

The HTC HD2 lives on, and more, in today’s news round-up with Jordan. In this episode, Jordan talks about the HTC HD2 getting a Windows Phone 8 port. In other news, Jordan talks about the HTC Desire HD getting a source-built 4.2.1 ROM and kernel. Jordan also talks about adding your own toggles in Android 4.2 Quick Settings.

Jordan talks about being able to restore the internal SD card after a bootloader unlock on the Galaxy Nexus. Also, Jordan mentions UnBrickable SD for the Samsung Galaxy Camera by XDA Elite Recognized Developer AdamOutler. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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MobyRadio

Pandora Radio has become quite popular with mobile users. It’s available through your browser, and there are mobile apps for at least Android and iOS. It features a simple interface, customizable radio stations, and it doesn’t cost money to use it unless you want it to. Now, Windows 8 users have a dedicated app to get Pandora Radio.

XDA Forum Member hsalps posted a thread that outlines the various features of the radio app. It’s called PRadio, and it’s an essential app for Pandora Radio fans. Some of the features include:

* Add radio stations via the search charm
* Search for Genre, Album, Artist and Songs
* Delete radio stations via the app bar
* Pin radio stations to start menu
* Play/Pause/Skip songs
* Multimedia Keyboard Support
* Support for snapped view and portrait layout.
* History of Songs Played
* Share Song Information with other applications via share charm
* Provide feedback for a song
* Background Streaming
* Support for touch and tablets

There are some setbacks, though. It’s only available to Windows 8 users in the United States. There is also an error where songs don’t change when the screen is off. Other than that, users seem to be enjoying it. If you have Windows 8 and like Pandora Radio, this is definitely something to keep an eye on.

For more details, check out the original thread.

camspeed

Some time ago, we brought you a tour through what XDA members and developers were doing on Windows 8. Since then, Windows 8 has been officially released, as has Microsoft’s flagship tablet, the Microsoft Surface. Now, app devs have begun making applications for it.

XDA Forum Member hulkkii starts us off by porting an application that Android and WP7 users already have called CamSpeed. For those who don’t know, CamSpeed is a camera benchmark test that measures how fast and quick the camera is. Here’s what it measures:

- Focus Time. Time from focus call to successfull focus event.
- Capture Start/Shutter Time. Time from capture call to the moment when the capture sequence has started.
- Capture Image/JPEG Available. Time from capture call to the moment when an image is available.
- Capture Completed. Time from capture call to the moment when the capture sequence is complete.

So if you’re looking to benchmark your Windows 8 device camera, this is how you’d do it.

XDA Senior Member and TV Producer lseidman has released an application called Health Center. This useful, if unusual, application allows users to search various prescription medication names for price comparisons. Essentially, it’s a pill search application. One never thinks they’d need an app like that until they actually need an app like that.

It’s almost certain that many, many more applications will start to surface as Windows 8 settles in, and more developers get their hands on it. For more details, check out the CamSpeed thread or the Health Center thread.

Jordan11-05

Recently, we at XDA have been releasing more Android and Windows Phone news updates than you could possibly keep up with. Luckily, Jordan is here to help you get caught up on any news you may have missed. Jordan mentions the PACman Rom‘s release for the Samsung GT-I9100 and GT-I9100G. Jordan talks about the exciting Windows 8 news, like the articles on the HTC 8x RUU and the Windows Phone 8 SDK.

In Android 4.2 news, Jordan mentions the Nexus 4 System dump. In other Nexus 4 news, Jordan mentions the article on possible build quality issues. Finally, Jordan talks about adding unlimited apps to the Galaxy Note 2 multi-window feature. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

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Surface

The release of Windows 8 has come and gone, and people have mixed feelings about it. Some like it; some hate it—pretty much the consensus on everything ever released. Now that it’s released, though, it’s time to have some fun with it. That means hacking it, making it more usable, and more fun. To start, users of the Metro Browser can now get full Flash on any website.

XDA Recognized Developer Marvin_S has figured out how to get past Metro Browser’s Flash restrictions on certain websites. As Marvin_S explains:

As we all know Windows RT/8′s IE Metro browser has limited flash support based on a whitelist. However a lot of sites are not (yet) whitelisted and hence do not work as desired. So I did some digging in the whitelist mechanism and found a way to hack it.

To apply the hack, users navigate to and open C:\Users\[USER_NAME]\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\IECompatData\iecompatdata.xml. From there users can add their favorite websites to the whitelist and, thus, full Flash support. The syntax is quite easy and users shouldn’t have any problems getting it to work. This has been confirmed working not only on desktop versions of Windows 8, but the RT versions as well, like the on one the Microsoft Surface.

To learn more, check out the original thread.

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