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Posts Tagged: xda-devs

XDA DevDB is Live for All Users!

September 5, 2013   By:

ddb1

Today, we’re excited to announce that we’ve made DevDB open to all users who want to post development projects. As a reminder, DevDB is XDA’s new way of organizing development projects. We’ve been working on it for quite a while, and are pretty excited with how developers are already using it across the site.

It’s live for the most popular devices, and will be active for all future devices added to XDA. Over time we plan to add new features to DevDB and will be fixing bugs on a continual basis. If you spot a bug or have a feature request, post it in this thread.

Our friend Azrienoch put together a video that shows exactly how it works.

droid-ultra

Not too long ago we talked a little bit about the Moto X and gave it a place here on the forums. While Motorola’s first real post-Google flagship may not have what it takes to win over the specification-frenzied techno-elite, its innovative software features have won the favor quite a few. This has lead to apps that emulate much of the functionality on other devices. However, the Moto X isn’t Motorola’s only high end phone.

Launching exclusively on Verizon in the US, the Motorola Droid Ultra (as well as the Droid Maxx) shares much of its internals with the flagship Moto X. They both carry the Motorola X8 Computing System, which is essentially a 1.7 GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro, along with two low-voltage companion cores for additional processing. The Moto X and the Droid Ultra also share 2 GB of RAM, a 2 MP front-facing camera, and a 10 MP rear-facing camrea.

The Droid Ultra breaks free from its cousin device by offering a 5-inch AMOLED panel running at 720p with 294 ppi. It also features 16 GB of internal storage and a 2130 mAh fixed battery, all in a splash-resistant 7.2 mm enclosure that weighs just 137 grams.

Is the Droid Ultra your next phone, or are you holding out for the Moto X or HTC One on Verizon? Let us know in the comments below, and don’t forget to visit the newly created Droid Ultra forum.

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XDA_Articles

So the much anticipated Moto X launch has come and gone, and many power users were left feeling a bit underwhelmed. Packing a 1.7 GHz dual-core variant of the Snapdragon S4 Pro and a 720p AMOLED panel, the Moto X is certainly not in the same category as the class-leading flagships of 2013—or even 2012. Though with two ancillary processors working in tandem with the main CPU to process specialized tasks, the device’s X8 “Mobile Computing System” is certainly its standout feature.

The LG G2, on the other hand, is every bit a flagship device. The device, which as yet to hit store shelves, features a 2.26 GHz quad-core Snapdragon 800 SoC. The Snapdragon 800 is comprised of the new Krait 400 processor and the Adreno 330 GPU. The G2 features a 5.2″ 1080p True HD-IPS+ LCD, weighing in at relatively dense 424 ppi, and all of this is packed into a relatively thin 8.9 mm chassis.

Do either of these devices have what it takes to make you part with your hard earned cash? Let us know what you’re looking forward to in your next phone in the comments below, and don’t forget to head over to the newly created forums below to get in on the discussion:

ddb

Earlier this month, we announced the first stage of our rollout of XDA DevDB to a handful of forums. For those unfamiliar, DevDB helps developers on XDA better organize their ROMs, kernels, and other development works, while adding useful functions like a bug reporter, feature requestor, user reviews, download section with torrent functionality, and more. It’s heavily integrated into the forums, so that if you want to use XDA as usual, you can do so.

In the second stage of our roll out, we’re adding DevDB to a handful of new forums and are letting all Recognized Developers on XDA use the system (in the future, all XDA members will be able to post new works to DevDB). Additionally, we’ve fixed bugs and have added new pieces of functionality to DevDB. We see DevDB as a work-in-progress, and will be improving it over time.

Below is a list of forums that have DevDB enabled.

New forums:

Samsung Galaxy S 4 (international, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T)

Samsung Galaxy SIII (international, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T)

HTC One (international, Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T)

Sony Xperia Tablet Z

Nexus 10

 

Previously enabled:

Samsung Galaxy S II international

Sony Xperia Z

Galaxy Note II international

HTC Droid DNA

Nexus 4

Nexus 7

 

AscendP6-HandsOn-04-580-100

Just exactly how thin is too thin? Well, that’s a question that Huawei is trying to answer with its Ascend P6. And if you ever felt your current handset was a bit too portly, the P6 begs for at least a passing glance.

Coming in at a mere 6.2 mm thin, the Ascend P6 features a brushed metal rear and silver metal accents along its sides. The sleek device packs a 4.7″ 720p display, backed by their in-house quad-core Huawei K3V2 processor running at 1.5 GHz. The P6 also offers 2 GB of RAM, 8 GB of internal storage, a microSD card slot, HSPA+ 21 connectivity, and a 2000 mAh battery.

Do the Ascend P6′s sleek design and slim figure earn it a place in your pocket? Let us know in the comments below and head over to the newly created Huawei Ascend P6 forum to get in on the discussion!

Nokia-Lumia-1020

Have you ever wanted a little bit more resolving power from your cell phone’s camera? We’ve just added a forum for a device that gives you more than than your fill of megapixels. Of course, I’m talking about the Nokia Lumia 1020.

Devices in Nokia’s Lumia lineup have traditionally offered excellent camera image quality in their respective categories. But with the Lumia 1020, nearly all stops were pulled to give the device an incredible 41 megapixels of resolution. This includes adding a 1/1.5″ sensor that is slightly larger than the majority of point and shoot cameras in circulation, albeit only a paltry fraction of the size of even consumer-level M43 and APS-C cameras.

The “smartphone” internals of the Lumia 1020 are similar to most modern mid-level devices. The Windows Phone 8-powered device features a 720p AMOLED screen backed by a dual-core 1.5 GHz Snapdragon S4 Plus, 2 GB of RAM, 32 GB of internal storage, and LTE connectivity.

What are your thoughts on the 1020? Is its 10.4 mm profile going to earn itself a seat in your pocket? Do you think 41 MP is excessive for such a small sensor and lens? Let us know in the comments below, and be sure to head over to the newly created forum to get in on the discussion!

quotes

A few months ago, we announced XDA’s new mention and quote tracking system for our community members. We’ve been excited to see the system used tens of thousands of times per day. Earlier today, we rolled out a new controls that are available in the Mention System Settings page. You can now hide mention and quote notifications that you yourself make. This way, you can make sure you’re only notified when other users are quoting or mentioning you.

Capture

To say that the Internet has fallen in love with Google’s Nexus 7 refresh would be quite the understatement. After all, the new device is a healthy upgrade over its predecessor, packing a vastly improved screen and a faster processor in a slimmer and sleeker design.

The refresh features an IPS panel at 1080p resolution. At 7″, this equates to an impressive 323 ppi, making it the sharpest 7″ tablet currently on the market. The processor was upgraded as well, now featuring a quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro running at 1.5 GHz, just like the Nexus 4.

Because of these upgrades at a still affordable price point, it’s no wonder that we received overwhelming demand to give the Nexus 7 refresh a place in our forums. Well, you asked for it, and now you’ve got it. Head over to the newly created Nexus 7 (2013) forum to get in on the discussion.

XDA_Articles

If the release of Android 4.3 and the new Nexus 7 didn’t do quite enough for you, yesterday’s Google event also marked the release of Google’s new Chromecast. The diminutive media streamer will work with many apps to deliver seamless media streaming from services like Netflix and Pandora. It also can mirror tabs that you have open on any desktop instance of Chrome. And at just $35, it may well be quite the steal, but that depends largely on third-party development to support streaming to the device. To help spur things along, we’ve given it a home here on the XDA forums.

The Galaxy Tab 3 family is comprised of three variants of differing screen sizes: 7″, 8″, and 10.1″. The 7″ and 8″ are relatively similar to their predecessors. However, the Galaxy Tab 3 10.1, which now sports the speedy dual-core Intel Atom Z2560 processor running at 1.6 GHz. The 8″ and 10.1″ models sport a resolution of 1280×800, while the 7″ model runs at 1024×600.

Have you already ordered your Chromecast? Do any of the Galaxy Tab 3 variants make you excited? Is the Intel Atom in the 10.1 wasted on such a low density screen? Let us know what you think in the comments below, and make sure to visit the newly created forums to get in on the action:

갤럭시노트10.1제품스팩 영문

They say that good things often come in small packages. Well, whoever said that certainly never spoke with a member of the fairer sex. But luckily, the mobile tech world generally prefers diminutive device dimensions, so the Galaxy S 4 Mini has a definite niche to fill, so to speak.

The Galaxy S 4 Mini packs a 1.7 GHz dual-core Snapdragon 400 SoC backed by 1536 MB of RAM and 8 GB of internal storage.  The device weighs in at 107 g and is 8.94 mm thick. As the Mini moniker would allude, its screen is on the smaller end of today’s devices. Although, at 4.3″, the qHD Super AMOLED panel is as large as what many considered gargantuan back in 2010.

Have you been looking for something slightly smaller than today’s modern behemoths? Do you think a 4.3″ device actually deserves the title mini? Head over to the newly created Galaxy S 4 Mini forums to get in on the discussion!

mydevices

We’ve added a couple of small new features for logged in users of XDA. The first is a new Participated Tab in our forum index that keeps track of all threads in which you’ve participated. The second is a new profile field where you can show off which devices you’re currently using. To add devices, go to the Devices section of the User Control Panel. You can add as many devices as you want, and they’ll show up in your profile and in the More Info box alongside any posts you make.

ddb

ddbOne of our goals for the year has been to better organize all of the development works (ROMs, apps, tools, kernels, etc.) on XDA. We wanted this to be useful but also to have minimal impact on how developers post to XDA and on users who are happy with the current structure of the forums.

We’re currently testing a system, we call the Development Database (or DevDB for short) on a handful of forums (Galaxy S IIXperia Z, Galaxy Note II, Droid DNA, Nexus 4, Nexus 7). You’ll note that when you go to the gateway to those forums, such as that for the Xperia Z, you can now see a tab for ROMs. Each ROM is linked to a forum thread– just as it’s always been. But when you click through to these threads, you’ll notice that they’ve become “enhanced” with a shiny new menu bar as shown in the below screenshot. Developers have the option of which features they want to include for each project:

- Feature Requester
- Bug Reporter
- Screenshots
- Downloads (via our own torrent tracker)
- Q&A Thread Linking
- Reviews

READ ON »

Sales

For the longest time, XDA has been a bastion, a pillar in the world of development. This is essentially because we try our hardest to make the free flow of knowledge and information our main focus so that everyone can benefit and grow, but more importantly, because it encourages others to share as well.

Everyone understands that very few things in this life are free and many simply see the things that started as hobbies either as a potential business or even as a waste of time that would need to be monetarily justified in order to carry on with their continued existence. This almost inevitable shift in mentality of people who slave themselves behind keyboards has led into a rather interesting new business in the underground world of mobile development: paid apps. Mind you, we are not saying that this is a bad thing. In fact, economic stimulus can be a fantastic driving force to get you to do more. But again, remember: XDA is a place to share knowledge, not make a quick buck.

Having said that and because of a large influx of brand new developers due to the advent of Android, we feel that we needed to clarify a few things regarding paid work on this site. First off, lets start with the most obvious place, Rule 11:

11. Don’t post with the intention of selling something.

  • Don’t use XDA to advertise your product or service. Proprietors of for-pay products or services, may use XDA to get feedback, provide beta access, or a free version of their product for XDA users and offer support, but not to post with the intention of selling. This includes promoting sites similar/substantially similar to XDA-Developers.com.

  • Do not post press releases, announcements, links to trial software, or commercial services. unless you’re posting an exclusive release for XDA-Developers.com.

  • Encouraging members to participate in forum activities on other phone related sites is prohibited.

  • Off-site downloads are permitted if the site is non-commercial and does not require registration.

  • Off-site downloads from sites requiring registration are NOT encouraged but may be permitted if the following conditions are met:A) the site belongs to a member of XDA-Developers with at least 1500 posts and 2 years membership who actively maintains XDA-Developers’ support thread(s) / posts, related to the download,B) the site is a relatively small personal website without commercial advertising/links (i.e. not a competitor forum-based site with purposes and aims similar to those of XDA-Developers.com.)

 

Now, a big chunk of Rule 11 deals with other topics aside from paid apps, so we will only focus on the two bold, underlined sections (the first two bullets for those reading this in apps that may not display formatting correctly). Both of these converge to the same point: Do not use xda to make money. Use it to share, to learn from others, to teach, to help; this is the intent of our site. This is what we are here for and the sole reason why we have survived for 10 years (and counting). If you feel that you must/want to post your paid work in here, you are welcome to do so. But if you choose to, please make sure that you follow a few simple guidelines to keep you out of trouble:

 

Pro-Tip #1 – Sell in the correct area

If you have a paid app that you are advertising on xda-developers, it must be posted in the Paid Software Announcement and Discussion section, which has a few guidelines that need to be followed before posting. To save you some reading, you must be a member in good standing with some good history behind you on the site. This way, we ensure that people are not here solely to sell stuff.

 

Pro-Tip #2 – Sharing is caring

If you do not have the status to sell your apps directly on the aforementioned Paid Software section, you may link to your paid app in the app store from a thread that offers a free version of the app you are trying to sell. In other words, you must create a free version of the app that is either exclusive to xda-developers or at the very least, free of charge. The free app, however, must not be:

  • a time trial (expires after some time post installation);
  • crippleware (an app whose core functionality is affected to the point of it being unusable – ie a back-up app that will only allow you to back up a small number of apps per day);
  • If ads are present, please ensure that they do not interfere with the app’s usability.

So, what you can do is to go about using some of the commonly used methods of free app developers, such as

  • ads;
  • in-app purchases;
  • unlock extra functionality (think Ever-Root in Mobile Odin or touch free batch back up in TiBU).

To sum this one up, feel free to have a Pro/Advanced/Plus/Premium/Donate (or whatever you want to call it) version of your app alongside the one you are sharing with the community. If people like your work, they will likely want to see what you can do when money is involved.

 

Pro-Tip #3 – Link =| Spam

Be mindful of the amount of advertising you do with your paid work. Again, you can link from within the thread of your free version. However, you cannot include direct links to your paid apps in your signature, profile, or anywhere else. You can, however, put links to your free app threads in the aforementioned places, which already contain links to the paid counterparts. Simply put, you must first present your free app before you direct others to your paid work.

 

Pro-Tip #4 – We Showcase Free Apps!

We tend to feature free work on the Portal, regardless of whether it has a paid counterpart or not. Use it to your advantage. And don’t forget to submit a tip if you feel that you meet all of the above and wish for additional exposure.

 

That is essentially it. Following the above will certainly ensure that your stay at our site maximizes your time spent here as that of others. Always remember, sharing in here is about sharing knowledge and not finished goods. That is what the Play store is for. Thanks for reading and happy sharing!

 

Small link to the rules for a bit of a refresher course for those who need them :)

Want something published in the Portal? Contact any News Writer.

 

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