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Posts Tagged: Xposed

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It’s been a while since Android 4.4 KitKat was released, and we’re slowly preparing for a new version cooked up somewhere in Google’s secret AOSP laboratories. With KitKat, Google for the first time decided to use transparency in Android’s ubiquitous status bar. It’s a great improvement in terms of aesthetics, but unfortunately not every app has this feature enabled. Fear not as with the help of XDA Senior Member StephenMilone‘s Xposed module, KitKat can start look better.

With this module, status bar transparency will be available in every application, not just the launcher and a handful of other apps. This module is experimental, and some applications like Gmail, Greenify, and even Xposed Installer itself may suffer some weird bugs or even stop working properly. The list of incompatible applications isn’t long though, and hopefully will get shorter with upcoming releases. Needless to say, this module will work only with API level 19+ (Android 4.4 and higher), where transparency has been enabled. To use this module, you need to root your device and enable the module in Xposed Framework Installer (which will stop working afterwards, so be prepared or don’t mark it on the list).

If you want translucent status bars in every app, head over to the module thread and give it a shot.

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The Google Nexus 5 is a great and rather popular device. This LG-produced flagship should receive a 4.4.3 update pretty soon, which will hopefully fix all of KitKat’s remaining bugs. This upcoming version of Android will be the third hotfix released since the launch of Android 4.4 KitKat alongside the Nexus 5 itself back in late October of last year.

One device feature that needs a bit more polish is the ambient light sensor, which currently has a tendency to go haywire when auto brightness is enabled. Most bugs of this type can be fixed relatively easily with Xposed Framework, and the ambient light sensor issue is no different thanks to XDA Forum Member abusalimov.

Abusalimov’s Xposed Module works by intercepting all ambient light sensor readings, and replacing the erroneous 30000 lux value, which occurs due to HAL problems. And since the module intercepts the sensor readings, there is no need to use additional applications as a workaround for the issue.

If you’re unhappy with the ambient light sensor performance of your Nexus, head over to the module thread to give this a shot.

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callblocker

In today’s modern world, your number gets in people’s hands, even if you are very careful. Well-meaning friends give your number to an insurance salesman. Or you ex can’t get over that fact that you left him or her and won’t stop calling. No matter how hard you try, eventually you are going to want to block a number from calling you.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that blocks phone numbers efficiently and easily. XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG created the Call Blocker Xposed Module. TK shows off the module and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

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Many are fans of particular OEM skins and their built-in features. One of the features available in stock Xperia ROMs is a Battery Stamina Mode, which was introduced to help users make the most of their batteries.

In this mode, all connectivity except GSM is disabled. This also disables your device’s LED lights. It works pretty well, but many find that disabling the LED is unnecessary. After all, without an LED, it’s rather easy to miss a call or message.

Now thanks to an Xposed Framework module by XDA Senior Member itandy, you can re-enable your LED leven when in Battery Stamina Mode. As you would expect, you need to be rooted and have Xposed Framework installed to get this going. And since this is an Xposed module, you can easily disable this when you want to go back to standard Battery Stamina Mode.

You can find the module in the original thread.

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Data security is very important, and we’re all well aware of that fact. Heartbleed only underscored our reliance on the security of our digital data. On the mobile device front, there are several ways to protect our data from prying eyes. One of them is a lock screen. You can secure your lock screen in several ways, including a variable device unlock PIN, face detection, passwords, traditional PINs, and of course pattern unlock. But an overly secured device can then also be a burden to its owner. After all, our memories aren’t perfect, and we may forget our unlock codes.

Entering an incorrect password five times forces you to wait 30 seconds before being allowed to try again. But none of us like waiting. With this in mind, XDA Senior Member hamzahrmalik created the More Pattern Attempts module for Xposed Framework.

As its name implies, More Pattern Attempts increases the number of incorrect patterns that can be attempted before the device locks itself to 20. The notice regarding five failures remains, but you will be able to enter the next patterns immediately. After 20 incorrect combinations, the device is locked and can only be unlocked by signing into your Google account. Since this comes in the form of an Xposed module, it works only on rooted devices with Xposed Framework installed.

You can find more information in the module thread.

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Nothing provides more satisfaction than making something yourself. Learning is a beautiful process. And when you create even something small with your own brain, you feel like a king. The same thing applies to Android, where first you start by using apps created by others and then you may venture to make your own.

Xposed Framework module development differs a bit from that of a regular application. As you know, Xposed Framework allows you to modify many aspects of the Android OS without APKTool, decompiling, pushing back to your device, and all of the requisite clutter. If you are ready for a challenge, XDA Forum Member hamzahrmalik posted a tutorial on how to create an Xposed module.

Before you get started, you should know that this isn’t an easy process. You must know quite a bit about Java. But with a bit of an effort, you should be able to create your own module. The module presented as an example in the guide was made in Eclipse, but you can use an IDE to compile an application. You should be able to create one on every operating system that supports Eclipse.

So if you think that now is a good time to start developing some Xposed module, make your way to the tutorial thread to get started.

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As we mentioned many times, KitKat was a quite substantial update to Android. The biggest change was probably the introduction of ART as an optional new runtime compiler. One of the other highlights is the new immersive mode. If you aren’t familiar with the name, it’s like entering a full screen mode on your device. Your software buttons are hidden, and you can bring back the status bar by swiping down from the top of the screen.

When you enter immersive mode for the first time, you are forced to accept a message explaining what immersive mode is and how to get back your navigation and status bars. This is then stored in memory, and you won’t have to accept this once again. However, Google implemented a “panic mode” for the more forgetful out there. This mode is actuated when a user turns off the screen and turns it back on within 5 seconds while in immersive mode. After that, the immersive mode message returns. Needless to say, that it’s not a convenient situation for those who have a habit of locking and unlocking their screens. Thankfully, XDA Forum Moderator GermainZ wrote an Xposed Module to prevent panic mode from being activated. The module simply disables the message and the annoyance. To use the module, your device must first be rooted, and you must be on the latest version of Xposed Framework.

If you would like to disable immersive mode’s panic mode, make your way to the module thread and give it a try.

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Privacy is an important topic in Android and mobile computing in general. Since its initial release, Google has implemented a few different ways of securing one’s device. But even now with face unlock and certain devices featuring fingerprint readers, the time-tested PIN and unlock patterns are still arguably the most popular. But the main disadvantage of these two methods is that prying eyes can easily see the code you are entering, compromising your data in the process.

If you care about your privacy as you should, an Xposed Framework module by XDA Senior Member elesbb may be up your alley. A single pattern, PIN, or password may be easy to remember, but remembering three patterns is a bit more tricky. This module siwtches between patterns, PINs, or passwords cyclically to enhance security and prevent people from accessing your data. Since it’s Xposed module, you must be rooted and have Xposed Framework installed.

To up your device security, head over to the module thread and give Cyclic Lock a try.

cooltool

XDA members are definitely Gadget Geeks. Some of us have such a heavy obsession that we spend days toiling away to get that extra 1% battery savings or free memory. When you are spending that much time tweaking your device, you want to know some serious stats and you want to know now!

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that allows you see your CPU usage, free memory, and more all on your home screen.  XDA Forum Member deviantstudio created the Cool Tool App and Xposed Module. TK shows off the module and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

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In recent Android releases, Google has become more and more unwilling to cater to the use of external SD cards. It was never quite clear why Google decided to abandon SD card support in their Nexus devices, but many believe this to be due to the added simplicity of removing another storage area.

While Google nixed the idea on its own devices, various OEMs decided to keep SD card slots in their devices. To use them properly, some modifications to Android’s source code were needed. And due to changes in how some later versions of Android handled SD cards, many applications lost the ability to access external SD cards. Luckily, Xposed Framework allows users to modify various aspects of their OS without messing around with the files themselves.

Annoyed by the external storage situation, XDA Senior Member defim created a module to fix the aforementioned issues. The only thing required to apply the fix is to enable the module in the Xposed Installer after successfully installing it on your rooted device.

If you are suffering from external storage handling problems on your Android 4.0.3+ device, make your way to the original thread and give this module a shot.

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“What’s the time?” You probably ask yourself this question countless times during the day. One second later, you’re probably checking the time on your smartphone. However, the system clock in the status bar can’t be modified to much without digging into source code of SystemUI.apk.

Most things in Android can be modified without touching code. This is all thanks to XDA Recognized Developer rovo89 and Recognized Contributor Tungstwenty, who created amazing Xposed Framework. With this tool, even stock ROMs can be made usable and freed from inconveniences. The same applies to the status bar clock, which color can be changed automatically when a device is connected to Internet, thanks to XDA Forum Member stanbel and his Xposed module.

With this module, you will no longer require some pesky arrows showing whether the connection is established or not. If your phone has an access to the Web, the clock becomes green. If not, it is black. The module should work like a charm with all devices running Jelly Bean and KitKat. Since it’s a module, it requires your device to be rooted and you need to have Xposed Framework installed.

You can learn more about the module and get the APK by visiting the original thread. If you want to make your status bar clock a bit unique, make your way there to give it a shot.

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While reviewing Android’s code, you may find some small annoyances here and there. One of the most absurd is a delay that prevents you from starting activities after pressing the home button from any other activity than the launcher’s. This was perhaps useful when phones featured very little RAM, but now devices are powerful and Android is considerably better optimized.

Five seconds makes for a very long delay, which doesn’t really fit to a modern operating system. Lucky, there’s Xposed Framework and developers who make modules. Thanks to an Xposed module by XDA Forum Moderator GermainZ, you can get rid of the delay really easy.

Module installation is very easy, and requires you to activate the module in Xposed Installer and reboot. It should work flawlessly on Android 2.3 and greater. Hopefully, Google’s Android developers will notice that some things are better when they’re simple, and rectify this in an upcoming release like the rumored 4.4.3 mentioned last week.

You can find the module by vising the module thread or grabbing it directly from the Xposed Modules database.

gesturecontrol

Gestures are everything. Controlling your device with simple swipes and swoops will save you time. You no longer have to search in your cluttered app drawer to find your favorite apps. Now, you can just two finger swipe left to open your Chrome browser. But how to you get these swipes programmed? Maybe an Xposed Module will help.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that allows you to launch your favorite apps from with Gestures. XDA Senior Member FemBlack created the Gesture Navigation Xposed Module. TK shows off the module and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

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