• 5,738,494
    REGISTERED
  • 49,237
    ONLINE NOW

Posts Tagged: Xposed

UiKXVC9l

A couple of days ago, we talked about GravityBox receiving an update. One of the new features introduced in the update was “Heads Up mode,” which was discovered hidden somewhere in KitKat’s code. It’s a neat way of showing the notification in a floating window, implemented recently into CyanogenMod’s nightlies.

But if all you want to do is try out “Heads Up mode” on your device, you don’t have to install the GravityBox or pay for an in-app purchase. If you prefer a module with a single purpose instead, you might be interested in trying a module made by XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG. This module is very simple and does its job superbly. If you want to test it out on your device, simply install the module, restart your device, and you can enjoy the new, floating notifications–simple as that.

The list of requirements is short. Your device must be rooted in order to use the Xposed Framework, and you must be a KitKat user, since this module uses the discovered code. The project is fully open-sourced, so you can verify the code, improve it, or compile it to learn something new and maybe incorporate it into your personal project.

Are you excited to try out new notification method on your device? If so, don’t wait to visit the module thread and give it a shot.

GravityBox ultimate notification control heads up

Ever since its initial release nearly one year ago, we’ve talked quite a bit about the GravityBox Xposed Module by XDA Recognized Contributor C3C076. Initially offering features such as Pie Controls, expanded desktop, status bar quick settings tile management, and much more, GravityBox has always offered a very robust feature set. And over the past year, we’ve seen GravityBox receive KitKat compatibility through a separate branch, as well as plenty of new features, and all of this has helped the module evolve into an essential module for countless users.

Now, GravityBox for Android 4.4 KitKat has been updated to version 3.2.0. In this new version for free users, C3C076 has tweaked quick settings management and added the ability to define headset plug and unplug actions. The changes to quick settings allow you to set an extended battery info tile and show temperature, voltage, and battery percentage within the tile.

C3C076 also introduced additional functionality for users who donate using in app purchases. This includes a new “Heads Up mode” for notifications, which takes advantage of hidden code within KitKat that allows the Android OS to show you notifications in a floating window, which can be expanded with a two-finger swipe. Normally, we wouldn’t even bother mentioning a paid feature, but it’s important to note that since the project is fully open source (including Ultimate Notification Control with Heads Up mode), users are free to modify and compile a version for themselves without any restrictions.

If you’re an Xposed user, there’s really no reason to not give GravityBox a try. You can get started by heading over to the module thread. And those wanting to learn more about what went into 3.2.0 should visit the changelog post. And once again, users looking to build on the project themselves should head over to the project GitHub.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

Advertisment
Sony Xperia

Time and time again, Sony has proven itself to be one of the more developer-friendly OEMs available. That’s why it almost doesn’t matter which Sony Xperia device you’re looking at; there will generally be a healthy amount of aftermarket development, which translates to a cornucopia of source-built ROMs, kernels, and so on. Despite all this, many users find themselves relatively content with the stock Sony firmwares and their OEM-bundled apps. For these users, it’s often more convenient to modify the stock firmware (or how it behaves), rather than to start fresh with a source-built ROM.

Screen Tweaks by XDA Senior Member Pezo is an Xposed Framework module that’s aimed to bring quite a lot of screen-related customization to Sony Xperia devices. In its initial iteration, Screen Tweaks allowed users to hide the “swipe to unlock” text on the lock screen, enable the CRT screen-off animation, and prevent the screen from turning on every time you plug or unplug the charger. The last option unfortunately didn’t work at first, but was later fixed in the second release. Not too long after, Pezo also added a few more options that allow users to hide the camera icon, carrier label, and sparkle effect on the lock screen. However, the last two (carrier label and sparkle effect) only seem to work on certain devices at this time.

If you’re rocking a Sony Xperia device running a stock or stock-based firmware, Screen Tweaks will likely give you quite a bit of screen-related customization. You can get started by heading over to the module thread or the Xposed repo and downloading the latest version.

Xtended Navbar for Xposed

On-screen navigation buttons undoubtedly have their pros and cons. While many don’t care for the lack of true haptic feedback or “wasted” screen real estate, many others favor the sleek lines and versatility only possible with on-screen buttons. For those of us who happen to fall in the latter category, it’s hard to go back to a device with hardware buttons–but that’s not to say that on-screen keys can’t be made even better!

XDA Senior Member fmaster1 recently released a new Xposed module called Xtended NavBar. And as you would expect from its name, it aims to make your software navigation bar even more versatile. With this module enabled, you can swipe from the edges to change to your music player or access quick settings, and you can swipe back to return to the standard navigation keys.

The module itself should work on any Android 4.3 and 4.4 devices with Xposed framework installed, and should even be compatible with some other navigation bar customization modules. You can learn more by heading over to the module thread.

Hodor!

June 20, 2014   By:

HODOR

Hodor, hodor hodor. Hodor, hodor!  Sorry about that, folks. It looks like we got a little carried away, there.

You may recall that a few weeks back, a rather “unique” Game of Thrones-themed keyboard appeared for Android. Rather than actually allowing users to write anything of their choosing, this keyboard simply allows users to type Hodor, much like the strange but lovable recurring character in Game of Thrones. So what happens when you take a joke keyboard and go a step further? Let’s find out!

XDA Forum Moderator GermainZ created a one-of-a-kind Xposed module that turns practically all displayed text into the word “Hodor.” This module changes how text is displayed in essentially any app, and in pretty much all circumstances. There are a few exceptions, however, and these include WebViews and possibly a few others.

Obviously this module is not something that you’d want to run for anything other than a quick laugh or to show off to GoT-loving friends. But if you’re a GoT fan and you want to spend a few minutes living the life of the Starks, head over to the module thread and give Hodor a try.

Screen Off Animation

The CRT screen-off animation has been with Android ever since version 2.3 Gingerbread. It’s been tweaked a bit here and then in the time since, but for the most part it’s been the same. Unfortunately for fans looking to modify the feature or incorporate it into ROMs that lack the feature, doing so has always involved modifying system files.

Now through the magic of Xposed Framework, you can do so without making permanent modifications—assuming you already have Xposed installed. This Xposed module, which is aptly called ScreenOffAnimation, comes courtesy of XDA Recognized Developer zst123.

As you would expect from its name, ScreenOffAnimation allows you to set a screen-off animation on devices that don’t natively support the feature. These animations can be customized heavily, including changing both the speed and animation style. You can also define a screen-on animation if you don’t mind a delay when turning on your device. What’s more, you can also enable animation randomization so that you’re never bored when turning on or off your screen.

If you’re running Android 4.0 or greater and you’ve been looking to add or customize your screen on and off animations, head over to the module thread and give ScreenOffAnimation a shot.

Android Clipboard Manager

The Android OS has offered unified, system-wide copy/paste functionality for quite some time. But like most implementations on the majority of OSes, the stock Android clipboard manager only retains the clipboard’s latest entry. Luckily there are tools available in order to expand the clipboard manager’s functionality.

One such tool was developed by XDA Senior Member plbelanger with his app Clipboard Admin. This application runs in the background and copies all clipboard entries into an SQL database for later viewing. But rather than truly integrating  with the OS and letting you directly paste into text fields, users are only able to manually access or export the clippings.

Now through the magic of Xposed Framework, XDA Forum Member DHM47 was able to create a module that integrates with the OS’s native copy/paste functionality. As shown in the image to your right, the additional clipboard functionality is exposed when entering the text selection menu, though you can also access it by long-pressing “Paste” during cursor placement. From here, you are just one tap away from summoning a previous clipboard item. And if you wish to have a better look at one particular item, long-pressing any individual clipboard menu zooms in and exposes its entire contents.

Android’s built in copy/paste functionality is great, but now users running Xposed framework can make it even better. If you’ve ever wanted a more robust copy/paste system on your Android device, simply head over to the module thread to get started.

lg knock code xposed

LG’s KnockOn has been very popular on recent LG devices. This feature was then expanded on their latest device, the LG G3. Originally introduced on the G3, Knock Code then allows you to unlock with a knock pattern. But here at XDA, we don’t like features being device-specific, so we work on replicating the idea on other devices.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you unlock your device with a Knock Code. XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG created the Knock Code module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

youtube

When you open the YouTube application on your Android device, it defaults to the “What to Watch” screen. This is great for most users, as it shows some videos from your subscriptions, as well as videos that Google thinks you may be interested in viewing. However, not everyone likes being defaulted to this screen at launch.

Many others would instead prefer to be dropped into their Subscriptions pane, the Watch Later list, or perhaps even a particular playlist/subscription. Now thanks to an Xposed module by XDA Forum Moderator GermainZ, you have the freedom to have your app default to any pane of your choosing.

Aptly titled as “YourTube,” this Xposed module allows you to select your default YouTube pane as What to Watch, My Subscriptions, Watch Later, Browse Channels, or even a custom playlist or subscription ID. Setting the default pane to the first four options is simply a point and click affair, but as you would expect, setting the default pane to a particular playlist or subscription requires you to first locate the ID for the list in question. Luckily, Germainz also explains how to do that in the thread.

If you don’t really care for the What to Watch pane in the stock YouTube app and would like to have it default to a different screen at launch, you should give YourTube a try. You can do so by visiting the module thread.

Force Fast Scroll

You may have noticed in your everyday usage that scrolling behavior isn’t identical in every Android application. In the majority of cases, developers use the built-in ListView functionality to create these scrollable lists. But even using ListView, the end result isn’t always the same.

Certain sorted scrollable ListView instances feature a draggable scroll bar on the right hand side that allows you to quickly navigate between the different list categories. This draggable scroll bar appears when the developer adds android:fastScrollEnabled=”true” into the XML file for the activity in question. But even though many of us find the function extremely useful, this obviously isn’t always the case in every app.

Luckily, XDA Senior Member hamzahrmalik wrote a simple Xposed module that allows users to enable fast scrolling in every app that uses ListView. Once enabled, this module forces every ListView in every application to use fast scroll, like what you’re used to seeing in the contacts app shown in the screenshot to your right.

Naturally, since this is an Xposed module, you must be rooted and running Xposed Framework. If you are an Xposed user and you’d like to speed up your scrolling in the vast majority of apps with a draggable scroll bar, head over to the module thread and give this a try.

Alarm Clock

If you’re running a minimally modified, AOSP-derived custom ROM, chances are that you have a love-hate relationship with the stock KitKat alarm clock app. You may be a huge fan of the application’s clean and modern user interface, and fancy all of the clock app’s built-in features, but you’d be lying if you said that you didn’t hate it every morning when you give in to your sleep drive and hit that Snooze button.

Luckily, this is where the aftermarket development community comes in. XDA Forum Member MythosXe recently created an Xposed module that tweaks the stock Android clock to add quite a bit of added functionality. You know how every time you hit the Snooze button, you first have to check the time to make sure you won’t be too late by allowing yourself a few more minutes of sleep? This module aims to prevent this added expenditure of energy of having to actually look at the clock by instead verbally telling you anything you would like. You can set the module to say the time and a friendly wake up reminder every time you hit Snooze, and you can even set a separate message when dismissing the alarm.

If you’re a heavy sleeper and have a hard time waking up in the morning, you may want to give this tweak a try. You can get started by heading over to the module thread.

Jordan0616

Geohot roots the Samsung Galaxy S5 and most other devices! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is a story talking about how Firefox OS apps can now run on Android, as well as how to control your Google Play Store permissions with finer detail! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure to check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for PinNotif. Then, Adam talked about simple Hacking prevention. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of TWRP Theme Manager. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

hulpVYR

If you’re an HTC device owner and you frequently find yourself using your phone while on the road, you probably have become well acquainted with Car Mode. For those unaware, HTC Car Mode is a user interface mode that puts together all of the most useful functions that you may find yourself using while in the car. This includes navigation, your phone dialer, music, and voice commands.

While Car Mode is  a great feature addition, HTC decided to limit its functionality quite a bit in Sense 6. Most likely to encourage more responsible driving and to discourage drivers from playing with their phones while on the move, HTC removed some features that were available in previous versions. The most noticeable example is the loss of status bar pulldown functionality and the ability to easily switch between applications for multitasking.

Luckily, this is XDA, and our community frequently finds ways around OEM-imposed limitations. To that end, XDA Senior Member Ambious created an Xposed module that brings back all of the missing functionality on Sense 6-powered devices. Naturally, in order to run this modification, you need both a device running Sense 6, as well as Xposed Framework.

You can reclaim your missing features by heading over to the module thread. However, please be careful when driving. There’s good reason why HTC removed these functions for the general population, and that’s because you shouldn’t be texting (or playing with your mobile device) while driving. But if used wisely, this can serve as a time saver for when you’re not actively driving, and you need to access your device.

Advertisement

XDA TV: Most Recent Video

Buy/Sell on Swappa

  • Nexus 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Galaxy Note 3 (T-Mobile) buy | sell
  • HTC One M7 (Verizon) buy | sell
  • Galaxy S 5 (Unlocked) buy | sell
  • Nexus 7 2013 buy | sell
  • Swappa is the official marketplace of XDA