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Posts Tagged: Xposed

Xtended Navbar for Xposed

On-screen navigation buttons undoubtedly have their pros and cons. While many don’t care for the lack of true haptic feedback or “wasted” screen real estate, many others favor the sleek lines and versatility only possible with on-screen buttons. For those of us who happen to fall in the latter category, it’s hard to go back to a device with hardware buttons–but that’s not to say that on-screen keys can’t be made even better!

XDA Senior Member fmaster1 recently released a new Xposed module called Xtended NavBar. And as you would expect from its name, it aims to make your software navigation bar even more versatile. With this module enabled, you can swipe from the edges to change to your music player or access quick settings, and you can swipe back to return to the standard navigation keys.

The module itself should work on any Android 4.3 and 4.4 devices with Xposed framework installed, and should even be compatible with some other navigation bar customization modules. You can learn more by heading over to the module thread.

Hodor!

June 20, 2014   By:

HODOR

Hodor, hodor hodor. Hodor, hodor!  Sorry about that, folks. It looks like we got a little carried away, there.

You may recall that a few weeks back, a rather “unique” Game of Thrones-themed keyboard appeared for Android. Rather than actually allowing users to write anything of their choosing, this keyboard simply allows users to type Hodor, much like the strange but lovable recurring character in Game of Thrones. So what happens when you take a joke keyboard and go a step further? Let’s find out!

XDA Forum Moderator GermainZ created a one-of-a-kind Xposed module that turns practically all displayed text into the word “Hodor.” This module changes how text is displayed in essentially any app, and in pretty much all circumstances. There are a few exceptions, however, and these include WebViews and possibly a few others.

Obviously this module is not something that you’d want to run for anything other than a quick laugh or to show off to GoT-loving friends. But if you’re a GoT fan and you want to spend a few minutes living the life of the Starks, head over to the module thread and give Hodor a try.

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Screen Off Animation

The CRT screen-off animation has been with Android ever since version 2.3 Gingerbread. It’s been tweaked a bit here and then in the time since, but for the most part it’s been the same. Unfortunately for fans looking to modify the feature or incorporate it into ROMs that lack the feature, doing so has always involved modifying system files.

Now through the magic of Xposed Framework, you can do so without making permanent modifications—assuming you already have Xposed installed. This Xposed module, which is aptly called ScreenOffAnimation, comes courtesy of XDA Recognized Developer zst123.

As you would expect from its name, ScreenOffAnimation allows you to set a screen-off animation on devices that don’t natively support the feature. These animations can be customized heavily, including changing both the speed and animation style. You can also define a screen-on animation if you don’t mind a delay when turning on your device. What’s more, you can also enable animation randomization so that you’re never bored when turning on or off your screen.

If you’re running Android 4.0 or greater and you’ve been looking to add or customize your screen on and off animations, head over to the module thread and give ScreenOffAnimation a shot.

Android Clipboard Manager

The Android OS has offered unified, system-wide copy/paste functionality for quite some time. But like most implementations on the majority of OSes, the stock Android clipboard manager only retains the clipboard’s latest entry. Luckily there are tools available in order to expand the clipboard manager’s functionality.

One such tool was developed by XDA Senior Member plbelanger with his app Clipboard Admin. This application runs in the background and copies all clipboard entries into an SQL database for later viewing. But rather than truly integrating  with the OS and letting you directly paste into text fields, users are only able to manually access or export the clippings.

Now through the magic of Xposed Framework, XDA Forum Member DHM47 was able to create a module that integrates with the OS’s native copy/paste functionality. As shown in the image to your right, the additional clipboard functionality is exposed when entering the text selection menu, though you can also access it by long-pressing “Paste” during cursor placement. From here, you are just one tap away from summoning a previous clipboard item. And if you wish to have a better look at one particular item, long-pressing any individual clipboard menu zooms in and exposes its entire contents.

Android’s built in copy/paste functionality is great, but now users running Xposed framework can make it even better. If you’ve ever wanted a more robust copy/paste system on your Android device, simply head over to the module thread to get started.

lg knock code xposed

LG’s KnockOn has been very popular on recent LG devices. This feature was then expanded on their latest device, the LG G3. Originally introduced on the G3, Knock Code then allows you to unlock with a knock pattern. But here at XDA, we don’t like features being device-specific, so we work on replicating the idea on other devices.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you unlock your device with a Knock Code. XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG created the Knock Code module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

youtube

When you open the YouTube application on your Android device, it defaults to the “What to Watch” screen. This is great for most users, as it shows some videos from your subscriptions, as well as videos that Google thinks you may be interested in viewing. However, not everyone likes being defaulted to this screen at launch.

Many others would instead prefer to be dropped into their Subscriptions pane, the Watch Later list, or perhaps even a particular playlist/subscription. Now thanks to an Xposed module by XDA Forum Moderator GermainZ, you have the freedom to have your app default to any pane of your choosing.

Aptly titled as “YourTube,” this Xposed module allows you to select your default YouTube pane as What to Watch, My Subscriptions, Watch Later, Browse Channels, or even a custom playlist or subscription ID. Setting the default pane to the first four options is simply a point and click affair, but as you would expect, setting the default pane to a particular playlist or subscription requires you to first locate the ID for the list in question. Luckily, Germainz also explains how to do that in the thread.

If you don’t really care for the What to Watch pane in the stock YouTube app and would like to have it default to a different screen at launch, you should give YourTube a try. You can do so by visiting the module thread.

Force Fast Scroll

You may have noticed in your everyday usage that scrolling behavior isn’t identical in every Android application. In the majority of cases, developers use the built-in ListView functionality to create these scrollable lists. But even using ListView, the end result isn’t always the same.

Certain sorted scrollable ListView instances feature a draggable scroll bar on the right hand side that allows you to quickly navigate between the different list categories. This draggable scroll bar appears when the developer adds android:fastScrollEnabled=”true” into the XML file for the activity in question. But even though many of us find the function extremely useful, this obviously isn’t always the case in every app.

Luckily, XDA Senior Member hamzahrmalik wrote a simple Xposed module that allows users to enable fast scrolling in every app that uses ListView. Once enabled, this module forces every ListView in every application to use fast scroll, like what you’re used to seeing in the contacts app shown in the screenshot to your right.

Naturally, since this is an Xposed module, you must be rooted and running Xposed Framework. If you are an Xposed user and you’d like to speed up your scrolling in the vast majority of apps with a draggable scroll bar, head over to the module thread and give this a try.

Alarm Clock

If you’re running a minimally modified, AOSP-derived custom ROM, chances are that you have a love-hate relationship with the stock KitKat alarm clock app. You may be a huge fan of the application’s clean and modern user interface, and fancy all of the clock app’s built-in features, but you’d be lying if you said that you didn’t hate it every morning when you give in to your sleep drive and hit that Snooze button.

Luckily, this is where the aftermarket development community comes in. XDA Forum Member MythosXe recently created an Xposed module that tweaks the stock Android clock to add quite a bit of added functionality. You know how every time you hit the Snooze button, you first have to check the time to make sure you won’t be too late by allowing yourself a few more minutes of sleep? This module aims to prevent this added expenditure of energy of having to actually look at the clock by instead verbally telling you anything you would like. You can set the module to say the time and a friendly wake up reminder every time you hit Snooze, and you can even set a separate message when dismissing the alarm.

If you’re a heavy sleeper and have a hard time waking up in the morning, you may want to give this tweak a try. You can get started by heading over to the module thread.

Jordan0616

Geohot roots the Samsung Galaxy S5 and most other devices! That and much more news is covered by Jordan, as he reviews all the important stories from this weekend. Included in this weekend’s news is a story talking about how Firefox OS apps can now run on Android, as well as how to control your Google Play Store permissions with finer detail! That’s not all that’s covered in today’s video!

Be sure to check out the other videos released this week on XDA Developer TV. XDA Developer TV Producer TK released an Xposed Tuesday video for PinNotif. Then, Adam talked about simple Hacking prevention. And later, TK gave us a an Android App Review of TWRP Theme Manager. Pull up a chair and check out this video.

READ ON »

hulpVYR

If you’re an HTC device owner and you frequently find yourself using your phone while on the road, you probably have become well acquainted with Car Mode. For those unaware, HTC Car Mode is a user interface mode that puts together all of the most useful functions that you may find yourself using while in the car. This includes navigation, your phone dialer, music, and voice commands.

While Car Mode is  a great feature addition, HTC decided to limit its functionality quite a bit in Sense 6. Most likely to encourage more responsible driving and to discourage drivers from playing with their phones while on the move, HTC removed some features that were available in previous versions. The most noticeable example is the loss of status bar pulldown functionality and the ability to easily switch between applications for multitasking.

Luckily, this is XDA, and our community frequently finds ways around OEM-imposed limitations. To that end, XDA Senior Member Ambious created an Xposed module that brings back all of the missing functionality on Sense 6-powered devices. Naturally, in order to run this modification, you need both a device running Sense 6, as well as Xposed Framework.

You can reclaim your missing features by heading over to the module thread. However, please be careful when driving. There’s good reason why HTC removed these functions for the general population, and that’s because you shouldn’t be texting (or playing with your mobile device) while driving. But if used wisely, this can serve as a time saver for when you’re not actively driving, and you need to access your device.

signature verification

If you’ve ever tried to modify and reinstall a system application, you probably encountered application signature checks in one form or another. Either you removed the original app before proceeding, or you gave your modified APK another package name in order to get it to install without first removing the old application. And in either case, you also had to re-sign the application yourself in order to get it to install in the first place.

You can get around all of these behaviors by temporarily disabling application signature checks. But before we get into the metaphorical meat and potatoes of this article and tell you how to do so, it’s critical that we talk a little bit about application signature checks, what they do, and why you should never remove them in the vast majority of cases. READ ON »

Status Bar SSID display with XSSID

If you’re a college student living in university housing or if you reside in a densely populated area, chances are that you have dozens of wireless networks in range. You may also have different WiFi networks in range that you connect to depending on task. For example, some schools and companies only allow users to access certain resources if locally connected. This then becomes an issue when you have many potential networks to connect to, as these resources may or may not work.

Luckily, it’s not very hard to check what WiFi network you’re connected to. Simply swipe down from your status bar with two fingers, and stock Android will tell you. However, that’s still one step that can be done away with. XDA Senior Member pyler created a simple Xposed module called XSSID Indicator that places your connected wireless network’s SSID right in the middle of your status bar. And since this area’s not ordinarily occupied by any information, there’s practically nothing to lose.

Naturally, you must be rooted and have Xposed Framework in order to apply this modification, but that’s the vast majority of us at this point. Head over to the module thread to get started.

[Screenshot courtesy of XDA Senior Member Ja_som]

translucent status bar

A few days ago, we talked about the rumored future of Android’s UI. Dubbed “Quantum Paper,” this initiative aims to deliver a much more consistent user experience across all Google products when accessed through Android, the Web, and even iOS.

One of the expected UI tweaks that we may see if and when Quantum Paper comes to fruition is the widespread use of tinted and translucent status bars. This, along with app-specific action bar colors, will lead to a highly unified user interface in Google’s core applications. But luckily, we don’t have to wait in order to enjoy a taste of some of the UI stylings that may make their way into the next version of Android.

Inspired by the previously covered Tinted Status Bar Xposed Module and by the rumored Quantum Paper UI, XDA Forum Member Woalk created Tinted Translucent StatusBar. This module allows you to make your status and navigation bars translucent, with a predefined color. The module also lets you to define how to handle applications with and without built-in action bars, and you are able to set this for every activity in every app.

If you’ve been looking for a way to clean up and unify your Android UI a tad and you have Xposed Framework installed, you may want to give this module a shot. You can get started by heading over to the module thread. And if you want to build off of this module to create something similar, head over to the project’s Github.

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