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Posts Tagged: Xposed

pinshortcuts

Every Tuesday like clockwork, we talk about an Xposed Module designed to help you make your life easier, more secure, or just more awesomer (yes, I say that is a word).  We’ve showed everything from Heads Up Notification Easter eggs to Deep Sleep Battery Saver, all the way down to PerAppFonts customization. And today will be no different. Here is a module that, perhaps, will make your life easier

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you activate apps from your PIN lock screen. XDA Senior Member hamzahrmalik created the PINshortcuts module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

Blurred System UI

Unlike Windows Phone or iOS, Android looks quite differently on various devices. OEM skins such as HTC Sense, Samsung TouchWiz, or the lesser known Emotion UI look totally different than barebones AOSP. Clean Android might have lots of fans because of its simplicity, but not everyone is a fan of the default UI.

Almost every OS flaw be fixed either by the source amendments or by using Xposed Framework by XDA Senior Recognized Developer rovo89 and his partner in crime Recognized Contributor Tungstwenty. If you want a nice looking expanded notification background, XDA Recognized Developer serajr prepared something that might be of interest.

Blurred System UI is an Xposed module that blurs the background of the Expanded Notification Panel. After applying it on your current ROM, you will see a partially transparent background, which looks quite a bit better than the standard solid background used in many ROMs. This module lets you to configure a few things like bitmap scale and blur radius, so you can get the expected results relatively easily.

The module currently works only on smartphones, but tablet compatibility might be added in the near future. It’s reportedly working with multiple ROMs—both skinned and AOSP-derived. You can find the module and Gaussian blur your notification panel by visiting the Blurred System UI module thread.

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Pinshortcuts

Security in Android (or any mobile device platform) is one of the top priorities for users. Google offers a few ways of protecting your private information and device data. These range from the popular pattern unlock to the old school, yet still functional PIN code.

By default the OS asks you to enter a PIN code once the device is powered on. Protecting it with just a single code may not be enough, so third party developers invented a new ways of protection every day. One of them was presented by XDA Senior Member hamzahrmalik. PINshortcuts is an Xposed Framework module that lets you set PIN codes on per-app basis.

For example, if you want to open XDA App, you can to enter 1234. When an you want to launch your Internet Browser, you can use a different PIN code like 4321. After entering the code, the app will start directly from lock screen. Naturally, you can unlock your device without launching any apps by entering the default PIN code. The solution is pretty useful, but you obviously need to be careful. The more codes you try to remember will lead to some that you inevitably forget. Also a longer list of PIN codes will also give intruders more chances to simply guess the number and steal your data.

PINshortcuts is an Xposed module. This means that your device must be rooted in order to use this module. If you would like to use this module on your phone or tablet, make your way to the PINshortcuts thread and give it a try. How would you extend the security and functionality of your device? Let us know in the comments below.

heads up notifications

Easter Eggs: we all love them and finding them is always a thrill. Whether it be added features or just random silliness, finding treats in a program is invigorating, so imagine how many Android enthusiasts are excited about the heads up notifications feature hidden deep inside KitKat.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you activate the pop up notification panel feature in KitKat. XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG created the Heads Up Notifications module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

status bar transparency

The time when the Android status bar was only black, without any transparency is now long since forgotten. With the release of KitKat, Google officially added support for translucent status and navigation bars to the default launcher and system UI, so every application can now use transparency.

Android development is evolving, and now most of things can be achieved without changing a line of code in smali. Xposed Framework by XDA Senior Recognized Developer rovo89 is a powerful tool for both users and developers. One of the modules presented by XDA Forum Member Woalk gives users the ability to change the status bar’s transparency style easily.

The module has eight available styles that can be applied. The list includes styles from Android L and HTC Sense 5, so if you are using the stock KitKat style, perhaps it’s the good time to see how this looks on other distributions. The only requirement (in addition to being rooted and having Xposed installed) is that your ROM must be AOSP or close to it. In the future, the list of supported styles will be expanded.

If you want to learn how to change the style of your status and navigation bars, head over to the status bar transparency module thread. From there, just download, install, and enable the module.

Google Keep Trash

Google Keep is one of these first party Google apps that has earned very positive feedback from its users. This app plays the role of a virtual notebook, and is loved by many.

Unfortunately, Keep isn’t perfect. The current model of deleting a note that serves no purpose is quite cumbersome. You need to perform three steps to get rid of it: First, you need to long press the note. Then, you tap on the three-dot overflow menu. Finally, you can select delete. XDA Senior Member xenon92 made this process easier using Xposed Framework. Keep Trash removes the three-dot menu step by adding a delete button to the current menu. You can easily save yourself some tapping, in order to make Google Keep more efficient.

Since Keep Trash is an Xposed Framework module, you need to have Xposed installed on your device. And of course, your phone or tablet must be rooted. Needless to say that this module works only with Google Keep, so you need to have it installed as well.

If Google Keep is one of your crucial applications in Android, enhance its functionality with Keep Trash. You can find it by visiting the Keep Trash module thread, so go there and give it a shot.

notifyclean

Speaking from personal experience, I know that no matter how hard I try to keep it clean, my Android Notification Tray gets as cluttered and dirty as the change tray in my car. Between the forty different instant messages and emails I get a day and other apps making their presence known, it’s sometimes hard to find stuff in one try. There has get to be a way to suppress those notifications that I don’t want.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you clean up your notification panel. XDA Senior Member defim created the NotifyClean module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

G3toolbox

If you’re looking for some comprehensive UI customization on your Android device, there’s really not much reason to look further than the Xposed framework. It has enabled extensive customization of the Android UI to be as flexible and convenient as opening up and browsing your favorite app, with modules such as the hugely popular Gravity Box standing testament to this. If however, you own an LG G3 and the current selection of modules are simply not enough to satisfy your customization cravings, you may want to have a look at the G3 TweaksBox.

Developed by XDA Forum Member P_Toti, G3 TweaksBox is packed full with G3 specific customization options, so many that you could spend some solid hours playing around with each individual option to your heart’s content. The list of things which can be customized with the module includes, but not limited to, the:

  • Status bar
  • Navigation bar
  • Ring pad
  • Notification panel
  • Quick settings panel
  • Recent apps window
  • Messages
  • Lock screen
  • Camera
  • Launcher

With so many options available, G3 TweaksBox comes with an interface that’s organized and navigable. Furthermore, P_Toti provides some brief explanations and instructions in FAQ section of the original thread on how to install and use navigation bar themes, and how to remove the AM/PM abbreviations from the clock in the status bar.

If you would like to give G3 TweaksBox a whirl yourself, be sure to check out the original thread for more information and download.

No Lock Home Xposed Module

Ding! You have a notification. And another. And another. Unlock your phone and check it–and again and again. But wait, you’re at home, there’s no danger of anyone snooping on your data or stealing your device, so why is the lock screen needed anyway? Turning it on and off every time you enter or exit your house is unceremoniously monotonous–and if you forget, say goodbye to privacy!

Look no further, for XDA Senior Member moneytoo has  just the solution you’re looking for in the form of an Xposed Module that turns off your lockscreen when you get home. Magic? No, this module works by looking for a “trusted location” that is determined based on your home WiFi network. The module works with any type of lock screen, including the fingerprint reader on the Samsung Galaxy S5, and promises no wakelocks and no internet requirement.

Head on over to the application thread to get started on your lockscreen-free usage. The module requires Android 4.4 KitKat and the Xposed Framework to run. The developer also states that future versions could include a GUI for access points and a Bluetooth based authentication system, similar to what Android Wear offers.

bluetoothun

Bluetooth is one of the most conventional ways we transfer files from one device to another, and this is even more so with the integration of NFC technology in almost every device that’s been released in the past couple of years. And there are good reasons for this too–Bluetooth is convenient, relatively fast, energy efficient, and most important of all, can be found within any tech device of the past 10 years. With all its upsides however, it’s unfortunate that the one thing holding Bluetooth back is the restrictions on the file types that can be received, at least on the Android OS–a gripe which can be easily solved now with an Xposed module.

Developed by XDA Forum Member Massi-X, Bluetooth Unlock gets rid of this restriction on file types and allows you to receive any file type that you wish from your device to another. Okay, so possibly not every file type there may be in existence, but definitely a good proportion of what’s out there. This is so as the module enables you to select the types of files you want to receive or block from an extensive selection of file types sorted into neat categories such as Application, Audio, and Message to name a few.

Bluetooth Unlock is available in English, Italian, and Slovak, and Massi-X is welcoming any other translations if you would like to help out. So if you would like to check this module out, visit the original thread for more information and download.

Suggestions Toggle Xposed Module

FDA-developers. No, I meant XDA-Developers. Blame autocorrect. Undoubtedly, all of us have a love-hate relationship with our phone’s autocorrect and suggestions engine. At times, it saves us from embarrassing typos, but other times, it smothers us with its over-the-top suggestions–especially for proper nouns and uncommon words. Like FDA XDA.

Disabling autocorrect won’t work, because it does do a lot of good after all and without it, we’ll end up typing nnosense txet. So what can be done? Well, XDA Senior Member theknut saves the day with his Suggestions Toggle Xposed Module which allows you to quickly toggle autocorrect by double tapping the text field that you’re typing in. Yes, its that simple.

Head over to the module thread to get started. The module works on both Swiftkey and Google Keyboard, and the only requirement is that you have Xposed Framework installed.

xposed

If by now you haven’t already heard of XDA Senior Recognized Developer rovo89‘s fantastic Xposed Framework–well, maybe you’re in the wrong place. But for those of us who are well acquainted with this incredibly versatile and powerful tool, there’s only one question: When Xposed will gain support for ART runtime, and by proxy, Android L.

Two weeks ago when we first learned that the L release would be the first version of Android to remove all traces of Dalvik and make ART the default runtime compiler, many in the comments were quick to complain about how this would “be the end” of Xposed Framework. Obviously, this is not true. However, bringing Xposed to ART isn’t as simple as one would imagine–especially given how rovo intents on releasing something that doesn’t just work, but also works well. In his words:

Well, “once” kind of implies that this will happen immediately after Google publishes the “final” version of ART. It should rather be read as “not before” they do so. It’s true that I’ve had a very experimental test build running some months ago. But ART is pretty complex, with lots of different operation modes that need to be tested. I figured it would be a waste of time to do so before ART becomes more stable. The fact that they are still pushing changes every day, including several huge internal refactorings (which will require adjustments in my code) confirms this. I will have to look at it once the official version is available, as then the change rate will hopefully decrease and also because much of it is trial and error. Apart from that, it will also show how other changes (e.g. dual-stack 32/64 bit Zygote, very strict SELinux policy) have an impact on Xposed.

So keep calm everyone. I’m pretty sure that the will be Xposed for ART (the final version, probably not for KitKat, at least at first), but please don’t freak out if it *still* isn’t published three days after Google I/O. If it takes a few weeks, then that’s what it takes.

But of course, a statement like this isn’t enough to keep users from asking this prized developer on a daily basis about when Xposed will be updated to work with ART and L. Luckily, he has once again spoken up regarding Xposed’s future, the progress thus far, what’s standing in the way, and more:

Q: if you can get xposed running in android L developer preview it will make xposed available to kitkat with art ?

“Getting it running” is one thing, whether it’s good to publish it is another question. I’ve had a prototype of Xposed for the ART preview in December already. Barely tested, needed manual installation, probably failing here and there, but generally it did what it should. But already back then, I’ve seen that Google is still working actively on improving ART. They have made huge internal changes since then. Last weekend, I made my prototype compile against the master branch of AOSP and I had to introduce lots of conditionals. That’s without knowing whether it will actually work, I just changed declarations, calls etc. to avoid compile time errors.

The ART preview in KitKat and the ART almost-final in the Android L preview are different pieces of software. Maintaining support for both of them means basically twice the work, especially for testing. That, and the fact that ART in KitKat was just an optional preview (with potential bugs that may be incorrectly blamed on Xposed), makes it less likely that I will publish Xposed for the KitKat variant of ART. That’s not a final decision, it depends on how ART development continues and how well I can support Android L. It’s important that Xposed works fine on upcoming Android versions where ART is the only runtime. KitKat support would be a bonus if it’s not too much effort to maintain in parallel.

Oh, and for everyone who thinks that posting “pleeeeease” or “you have to support it” will increase the chances of publishing something: It won’t. It will just annoy me and make it less likely.

Q: How about you just let him work on it and see how it’s goes. 
There’s literally no reason at all to bother him with questions, when he has something new to share he will, when he doesn’t those questions will be just annoying to him. Not yours personally, but the sheer amount of people bombarding him with all kinds of art related questions just add up.

Indeed. I have received lots of hints “hey, Android L is out now” – yes, I know. So for now, I have disabled PMs…
By the way, I have just read the “How to Report Bugs Effectively” essay by the PuTTY developer. It’s so true! 

So there you have it, folks. It’s actively being worked on right now. But even though there are ART-compatible test builds right now, the project is not yet ready for release because he wants to do more than just “get it running.” Furthermore, the differences between ART’s “preview” in KitKat and the more complete form in the L Developer Preview make it even more difficult to maintain code for both platforms.

In short, stop asking rovo for an ETA. And just like what we said for application developers, let him develop in peace.

xmod

One major and welcomed addition to the Sony Xperia user interface that came along with the Android 4.3 update was Xperia Themes. This feature allows you to effortlessly change a number of UI elements with custom themes created by the community, one of which includes the system-wide system accent. Normally, the only way to change the color of the system accent is to set a new theme, which may also inadvertently change other aspects of the UI. But if you’d rather change this setting specifically without altering anything else that you may have in place, there’s now an Xposed module which will allow you to do this.

Called simply Xperia Theme Xposed Module and developed by XDA Senior Member SArnab©®, the module enables you to conveniently change the color of only the system accent without touching anything else. The choice of colors are not restricted by the Xperia themes you have installed on your device, but rather, you have a wide range of colors to choose from. SArnab©® has provided two versions of the module, with one variant being ad-supported, and the other being ad-free. Both, however, are exactly the same in functionality.

As mentioned previously, this module will work with any Xperia device with the official Android 4.3 firmware or newer, as well as those with Android 4.1 and 4.2. If you would like to check Xperia Theme Xposed Module out yourself, be sure to visit the original thread for more information and download.

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