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Posts Tagged: Xposed

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When a phone or tablet gets stolen, not much can be done. Such situations should not occur, but the world isn’t perfect and some people want things for free. When this happens, there are some tools that help you protect your private data and wipe as a last resort.

Wiping data and locating your device is not everything that can be done remotely, however. XDA Senior Member leducbao has gone further and created an app that also can be used as an Xposed Framework module, to take a selfie of thief using front camera of your device. The photo is sent to a predefined Email afterwards. This data can help you and police gather evidence to catch the thief

Theftie works in three modes: Prevent protects the device from unauthorized access by locking it and making a selfie of the thief. Catch allows communication with the device. Finally, rescue data – retrieve your personal data like SMS, photos and documents and save them to Google Drive.

Just like Android Device Manager, Theftie can wipe the SD card and phone data. While activated, app can’t be uninstalled which makes your phone protected.

Don’t allow your device to be stolen without hope of rescuing your data. Head over to the application thread and give Theftie a shot.

Apps like Android Device Manager or Theftie don’t guarantee your device’s safety, so if your phone gets stolen, don’t hesitate to inform the local police.

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Unquestionably, many have grown to like Android L since its official unveiling. Since then, we’ve seen users come up with random application ports, ringtones, and other goodies from Google’s latest work in progress OS. We are all waiting for the official release, so why not give our current OS builds some of L’s graphical style?

Not too long ago, we talked about a theme that changes your UI to look like that in Android L. Unfortunately, however, this only works on ROMs with CyanogenMod’s new theme engine installed. Now, everyone can try Android L’s look on their devices.

XDA Forum Member Adhi1419 made this possible using Xposed Framework. The module themes pretty much everything, including statusbar icons, settings, calculator, ringtones, and so on. Some users reported issues with non-CyanogenMod ROMs, but hopefully they will be fixed soon.

Are you tired of your current Jelly Bean or KitKat look? If so, visit the original thread to change your theme right away.

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XDictionary Xposed Module

 

We’ve all likely had the pleasure of coming across words while using our phones that are  beyond our literary grasp, and this can prove to be extremely annoying. The typical solution in such cases is to switch to the browser and quickly Google the word in question, or alternatively, open a dictionary app and look up the word. However, doing so breaks the workflow and isn’t very user friendly.

For those of using the Xposed Framework, XDA Senior Member perseuso807 has come up with a delightful solution in the form of a module that adds a “Define” action to to text input fields next to the “Paste” action. Just like that, the previously tedious procedure becomes a one-click action.

In its current form, the module only supports text input fields and the English language, but the developer states that he has an expansion planned. Head on over to the module thread to get started. Needless to say, you must have the Xposed Framework up and running for the module to work.

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The Google Experience Launcher has become one of the most popular home applications on Android. It’s used as the default launcher in every Google Nexus and Google Play Edition device, and it’s found its way to many more thanks to various XDA members.

Although many care for the Google Now Launcher, it lacks quite a lot of relatively standard configuration options. XDA Senior Member theknut decided to do something about it, and used Xposed Framework to fix this with his module Xposed GEL Settings.

Not too long ago we talked about a theme that modifies your OS to look like Android L. If your ROM doesn’t support the theme engine, you can use theknut’s module to change the Google Now Launcher’s look to match the Android L style. The module changes icons, folder preview, drawer icon, and even animations, so it’s a complete solution before Android L reaches official status.

Like every Xposed module, XGELS requires a device to be rooted in order to work. Ensure that you have the newest version of Xposed and SuperSU installed before trying this module out.

If you are a Google Now Launcher user, you can add some Android L material design to the GEL. All you need to do is visit the module thread and give it a shot. You can find a complete changelog in the following forum post.

dsbatterysaver

Our phones are more powerful than ever. With lusciously crisp screens, GPS navigation, and quad core power, our phones can render a pixel better than ever. This naturally comes at a cost, battery life. Many people have resorted to carrying extra battery packs around, like the Lepow U-Stone or the RAVPower RD-WD01. However, there is a way to control your battery from your phone.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you control your phone’s sleep settings to save your battery. XDA Senior Member leducbao created the Deep Sleep Battery Saver module. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

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Android L is a big thing. And in many ways, it’s perhaps the biggest release since Ice Cream Sandwich, as it brings tons of new API and end user changes under the hood. Android L is already available to download as a developer preview for Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 (2013) users, and it should be ready for the public in the Fall. But in the meantime, you can enjoy bits and pieces from the developer preview ported to other devices with KitKat, Jelly Bean, and so on.

If you took a look at L screenshots, you undoubtedly noticed its changes to the navigation bar. It was redesigned to match the new Material design. Thanks to Xposed Framework and XDA Senior Member prithvee, you can now try the Android L’s navigation bar on your device. The module changes the look of the “standard” Android 4.0+ navigation bar to look like L’s modified offering.

The module is very simple and has no configuration options. To use it on your device, simply install the APK, enable it in Xposed, and reboot your device. The changes should be visible right away if you are running Android 4.0 or newer. Just be sure that you have Xposed Framework installed and properly configured.

To try out more goodies from the upcoming Android L, visit the module thread.

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How many times has someone tried to read your SMS or view your private photos? If you have a child and want to allow him or her to play some games on your phone without giving access to all your personal data, we have something that might interest you.

A new Xposed module written by XDA Senior Member WasseemB allows you to select up to three applications that your children can access (or eight in the paid version). All other applications are locked and require a PIN code. The module disables the recent apps button and the status bar, so it’s quite difficult to unlock the device without knowing the password. Pressing the home button returns to the application the select screen. Since this is an Xposed module, your device must be rooted and have Xposed Framework installed.

If your partner or children are too interested in your private data, make your way to the module thread and give WasseemB’s module a try.

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A few years ago when the whole Android party was starting, Google and Facebook were really closely integrated. Before Ice Cream Sandwich, users were able to see contacts synced directly from Facebook on their devices. Then, policies changed, and synchronization through the first party Facebook app was no longer possible, so people looking for contact syncing had to switch to a third party app in order to keep their contacts up-to-date.

Said third party apps, despite being great, have one big disadvantage: They are unable to get the Email address and phone number from your Facebook friends list. In the last few years, we’ve talked about an almost limitless number of Xposed modules for simple things like turning everything into Hodor (Hodor, Hodor, Hodor!!1oneeleven!) to more complex set of tools like GravityBox. Now, XDA Senior Member agentdr8 created a module to bring the Facebook sync functionality back. Everything is quite simple and requires just few simple steps to be followed. Once again, Xposed shows its potential to change almost anything on your OS.

Before using this module, ensure that your device is rooted and Xposed Framework is installed. After that, install the module, enable it, reboot, and enjoy your updated contact entries in your phone book. To learn more about this module, visit the original thread.

minminlock

In this day and age, we all have a lot of apps on our phones and tablets. Some of those apps may have some personal information on them or could cost us money, so it would be nice to keep people out of them. For example, you don’t want your friends stealing your phone and ordering weird stuff from your Amazon app, so you might need to lock your apps from opening.

In this episode of XDA Xposed Tuesday, XDA Developer TV Producer TK reviews an Xposed Module that lets you lock your applications. XDA Senior Member FatMinMin‘s created the MinMinLockmodule. TK shows off the modules and gives his thoughts, so check out this Xposed Tuesday video.

READ ON »

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A couple of days ago, we talked about GravityBox receiving an update. One of the new features introduced in the update was “Heads Up mode,” which was discovered hidden somewhere in KitKat’s code. It’s a neat way of showing the notification in a floating window, implemented recently into CyanogenMod’s nightlies.

But if all you want to do is try out “Heads Up mode” on your device, you don’t have to install the GravityBox or pay for an in-app purchase. If you prefer a module with a single purpose instead, you might be interested in trying a module made by XDA Recognized Developer MohammadAG. This module is very simple and does its job superbly. If you want to test it out on your device, simply install the module, restart your device, and you can enjoy the new, floating notifications–simple as that.

The list of requirements is short. Your device must be rooted in order to use the Xposed Framework, and you must be a KitKat user, since this module uses the discovered code. The project is fully open-sourced, so you can verify the code, improve it, or compile it to learn something new and maybe incorporate it into your personal project.

Are you excited to try out new notification method on your device? If so, don’t wait to visit the module thread and give it a shot.

GravityBox ultimate notification control heads up

Ever since its initial release nearly one year ago, we’ve talked quite a bit about the GravityBox Xposed Module by XDA Recognized Contributor C3C076. Initially offering features such as Pie Controls, expanded desktop, status bar quick settings tile management, and much more, GravityBox has always offered a very robust feature set. And over the past year, we’ve seen GravityBox receive KitKat compatibility through a separate branch, as well as plenty of new features, and all of this has helped the module evolve into an essential module for countless users.

Now, GravityBox for Android 4.4 KitKat has been updated to version 3.2.0. In this new version for free users, C3C076 has tweaked quick settings management and added the ability to define headset plug and unplug actions. The changes to quick settings allow you to set an extended battery info tile and show temperature, voltage, and battery percentage within the tile.

C3C076 also introduced additional functionality for users who donate using in app purchases. This includes a new “Heads Up mode” for notifications, which takes advantage of hidden code within KitKat that allows the Android OS to show you notifications in a floating window, which can be expanded with a two-finger swipe. Normally, we wouldn’t even bother mentioning a paid feature, but it’s important to note that since the project is fully open source (including Ultimate Notification Control with Heads Up mode), users are free to modify and compile a version for themselves without any restrictions.

If you’re an Xposed user, there’s really no reason to not give GravityBox a try. You can get started by heading over to the module thread. And those wanting to learn more about what went into 3.2.0 should visit the changelog post. And once again, users looking to build on the project themselves should head over to the project GitHub.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in!]

Sony Xperia

Time and time again, Sony has proven itself to be one of the more developer-friendly OEMs available. That’s why it almost doesn’t matter which Sony Xperia device you’re looking at; there will generally be a healthy amount of aftermarket development, which translates to a cornucopia of source-built ROMs, kernels, and so on. Despite all this, many users find themselves relatively content with the stock Sony firmwares and their OEM-bundled apps. For these users, it’s often more convenient to modify the stock firmware (or how it behaves), rather than to start fresh with a source-built ROM.

Screen Tweaks by XDA Senior Member Pezo is an Xposed Framework module that’s aimed to bring quite a lot of screen-related customization to Sony Xperia devices. In its initial iteration, Screen Tweaks allowed users to hide the “swipe to unlock” text on the lock screen, enable the CRT screen-off animation, and prevent the screen from turning on every time you plug or unplug the charger. The last option unfortunately didn’t work at first, but was later fixed in the second release. Not too long after, Pezo also added a few more options that allow users to hide the camera icon, carrier label, and sparkle effect on the lock screen. However, the last two (carrier label and sparkle effect) only seem to work on certain devices at this time.

If you’re rocking a Sony Xperia device running a stock or stock-based firmware, Screen Tweaks will likely give you quite a bit of screen-related customization. You can get started by heading over to the module thread or the Xposed repo and downloading the latest version.

Xtended Navbar for Xposed

On-screen navigation buttons undoubtedly have their pros and cons. While many don’t care for the lack of true haptic feedback or “wasted” screen real estate, many others favor the sleek lines and versatility only possible with on-screen buttons. For those of us who happen to fall in the latter category, it’s hard to go back to a device with hardware buttons–but that’s not to say that on-screen keys can’t be made even better!

XDA Senior Member fmaster1 recently released a new Xposed module called Xtended NavBar. And as you would expect from its name, it aims to make your software navigation bar even more versatile. With this module enabled, you can swipe from the edges to change to your music player or access quick settings, and you can swipe back to return to the standard navigation keys.

The module itself should work on any Android 4.3 and 4.4 devices with Xposed framework installed, and should even be compatible with some other navigation bar customization modules. You can learn more by heading over to the module thread.

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