Samantha · Jul 13, 2013 at 06:30 pm

Telstra Giving FBI Access to Australian Calls, Emails, and Online Messages

Looks like even we Australians haven’t been able to stay clear from the unprecedented, mass surveillance that Americans have been subjected to, as The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) has revealed today. It may or may not come as a shock that Australia’s largest telecommunications company Telstra has had a secret pact with the US intelligence agencies for at least a decade, obliging Telstra to store mass volumes of communication data of Australians for potential investigations by the US in the future.

An agreement penned when 50.1 percent of Telstra was still owned by the Australian Federal Government, it obliged Telstra to meet the demands of the FBI and Justice Department to “provide technical or other assistance to facilitate…electronic surveillance,” while allowing for all communications involving a US point of contact to be stored in a secure storage facility located on US soil and managed and sifted through by Americans with top-level security clearance. This data includes phone calls, emails, and online messages.

This means if you’re an Australian who’s contacted anyone in the US in the last decade at least, those related phone calls, emails, and online messages are stored in some dark, dank dungeon of borderline criminality with  big, shameful ‘Made in Australia’ and ‘Owned by the US’ stickers all over it. That’s not a very desirable place for your private information to be stored.

SMH has also confirmed that the agreement was still in operation “as recently as March 2011,” while Telstra has disappeared in their White House replica doghouse with the tail between the legs, refusing to comment or answer detailed questions about it.

This is a major concern for Aussies, as although the contract does not “authorise Telstra or law enforcement agencies to undertake surveillance” (SMH), the legality of the contract is very questionable, if not an “invasion of privacy and erosion of Australia’s sovereignty,” as spoken by the Greens on Friday. This is so, as there a a number of legislation such as the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 (Cth) and Telecommunications Act 1997 (Cth) that govern the ‘privacy of communications,’ with the former “[prohibiting] the interception of communications passing over a telecommunications system and prohibits access to stored communications (i.e. email, SMS and voice mail messages) except where authorised in specific circumstances” (Electronic Frontiers Australia).

And for Optus customers, don’t feel so safe, as our second largest telecommunications company has also declined to comment whether they have stored data for “potential surveillance by US, or Australian, authorities” (SMH). This also certainly doesn’t mean that all you folks with unmentioned companies such as Vodafone are exempt from such probings.

Let’s see how this unfolds, shall we?

“It’s How We [Dis]Connect” Telstra Advertisement

[Source: Sydney Morning Herald]


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Samantha

jman2131 is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. View jman2131's posts and articles here.
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