Mike Szczys · May 28, 2013 at 07:00 am

Weather App by Example Teaches JSON, HTTP, and API Use

Developers who are just getting started can leap through the learning curve by reading code written by more experienced programmers. It becomes even more useful if you can read an explanation of what each code chunk does, like with this weather app tutorial. Francesco Angola, who also wrote that guide on using Httpclient, has done a great job of explaining how to use a website API, parse a JSON string, and present the results to the user.

Francesco starts by exploring the data available from the Open Weather Map API. Don’t be confused by that web page title. The goal here is to gather text data on the current weather conditions, not to display on an onscreen map. Entering the URL in a browser returns a JSON string, whose format he uses to craft a parser method with the help of the JSONObject and JSONArray classes. I consider this to be the core of the guide. The parser lays out a roadmap for how the data object will be stored. This technique is easily adapted anytime you’re working with the JSON format. From here, he uses HttpClient to grab the string that feeds the parser. The guide concludes by creating a bare bones activity that displays weather conditions on screen.

Head over to his blog for the full tutorial.

[Via Reddit]


_________
Want something on the XDA Portal? Send us a tip!

Mike Szczys

szczys is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. Mike Szczys is a professional musician but spends all his free time working with hobby electronics. As Contributing Editor for Hackaday.com he became interested in Android as some of the early hardware hacks started popping up on the Internet. What followed was a gradually rising addiction to all things Android. View szczys's posts and articles here.
Mario Tomás Serrafero · Jul 30, 2015 at 02:04 pm · 3 comments

What Do You Think About Fingerprint Scanners?

More and more phones are featuring fingerprint scanners, and with many promising developments and it being natively supported on Android M, we can soon expect to see them on smartphones everywhere. If done right, it is a useful feature that allows for quick unlocking and authorization. There are concerns regarding security, but nonetheless the industry seems to be embracing it with open arms. What do you think?

DISCUSS
Aamir Siddiqui · Jul 30, 2015 at 01:20 pm · no comments

What’s Next for Samsung and Its Flagships?

If we were to say that the Galaxy S6 was a leap of faith made by Samsung, we wouldn't be too wrong. After all, the device marked a definite change in how Samsung perceived the market and its own place in it, as it stood amongst the signs of decline which started with the critical reception of the Galaxy S5. To recap, the Samsung Galaxy S5 was criticized heavily for feeling more like a toy, rather than a premium flagship...

XDA NEWS
Eric Hulse · Jul 30, 2015 at 12:24 pm · 2 comments

The Ultimate Showcase of dBrand Skins

In the search for ways to protect, accessorize, and personalize; a user has many options. One could choose a case, a “skin”, “armor”, or “wraps.” In fact, the global mobile accessory market is poised to reach a high of $62 Billion in 2017. dBrand is one of the more creative and friendly vinyl skin manufacturers around. In hopes of sharing what they can offer, our friends at dBrand sent us over some skins to have a look at. They offer...

XDA NEWS