jerdog · Oct 1, 2012 at 09:30 am

webOS: The Little Mobile OS That Could

Many grew up with The Little Engine That Could, a tale about the power of optimism and hard work. The goal is to spread hope through the metaphor of a little blue engine that defied all odds despite what others say. To keep motivated, the little engine chants, “I think I can; I think I can; I think I can.”

Open Source: a philosophy, or pragmatic methodology that promotes free redistribution and access to an end product’s design and implementation details.

From it’s beginnings with the Palm Pre in 2009, webOS has always been a unique animal in the mobile device market. Using the metaphor of cards that could be flung off the screen to terminate tasks, its approach to multitasking was unique at a time when iOS couldn’t / wouldn’t do it. The Palm Pre itself was actually a pretty nice device at the time, but like everything else Palm did, they bungled webOS and it never really took off. In April 2010, HP acquired the OS. After numerous, half-hearted attempts to take the OS forward, including the release of the HP TouchPad to compete in the expanding tablet market, they finally announced that they would halt device production and webOS development in August 2011. This lead to speculation that webOS would be killed off or sold to the highest bidder.

XDA exists so that like-minded developers can come and share their work and knowledge, as well as learn from others. We encourage open source development because that’s how true innovation happens. And without open source development, our favorite OS Android would not be where it is today. So when HP announced late last year that webOS would be open sourced rather than killed, the development community leaped at the news.

Except for a tidbit earlier this year about an HTC Evo 3D running a very dirty port of webOS, all has been mostly quiet on the Open webOS front. But now word is leaking out from the webOS-Ports team that webOS is being ported to the Galaxy Nexus. They have provided a video showing the device booted up with webOS and WiFi working, but it is quite obvious that hardware acceleration is drastically needed before this is actually usable—not to mention all of the phone functions, etc.

What makes this extremely interesting is that we are seeing the epitome of open source development. We have software—in this case a mobile OS—that the manufacturer no longer wishes to or is capable of supporting and improving. Then, you have a group of developers who see the potential of said software. And after a lot of hard (often thankless) work, we have the makings of another alternative for the mobile community. This is the crux of what makes XDA what it is. We look forward to seeing where this project goes.


_________
Want something on the XDA Portal? Send us a tip!
Jimmy McGee · Mar 5, 2015 at 06:00 am · 1 comment

RAVPower RP-WD02 – Android Accessories Review

There are so many Power Banks out there. However, they are not all the same. Some sacrifice weight for capacity. Others do the opposite. Some come with two ports and some come with more, while others come with less. Some are just batteries with a case around it, but others have some unique features. In this episode of XDA TV, Producer TK reviews the RAVPower RP-WD02 Wireless Filehub & Portable Travel Router. This device is the successor to the RP-WD01...

XDA NEWS
GermainZ · Mar 4, 2015 at 07:09 pm · no comments

A Look at the Telegram+ Situation

Most of this article doesn't only apply to Telegram+ -- it just happens to be an example that got a lot of coverage elsewhere, with many authors or commentators putting the full blame on Google, Telegram, the Telegram+ developer or even WhatsApp Inc (eh?). In this article, we'll try to look at the different aspects to provide a clear view of what actually happened, and what can (and hopefully will) improve with regards to developers in general and the Play...

XDA NEWS
Aamir Siddiqui · Mar 4, 2015 at 12:11 pm · 2 comments

Multi Boot: The Fall of Nandroid?

Ever since custom recoveries and roms became popular, nandroid backups have been the fall back method for all android enthusiasts, irrespective of their confidence levels. They allow easy backup and restore in case things go wrong, which happens invariably when a modification is being tested. With that being said, how relevant are Nandroid Backups to this day? Back in 2011, when the world of Android was being awed by the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S2, a little modification made its appearance...

XDA NEWS
Share This