ElCondor · Apr 25, 2010 at 03:22 pm

Windows Phone 7 Facts: .xap to Replace .cab

XDA member and moderator Da_G has showed us some interesting facts about Windows Phone 7 in the WP7 Development and Hacking section. In the following weeks, we will be covering the more technical side of the currently unreleased OS by Microsoft. We’ll try to make it as easy to read as possible, so get yourself a cup of coffee, sit back, and read!

Most of you probably know about the .cab files. We’ll be talking about the Cab file used for Windows Mobile. Cab files are nothing more than installation packages that copy the files and registry edits from the package to the desired folder on your device. These ‘cabinet’ files, which originally were called ‘Diamonds’,  were used since the very first Windows Mobile devices.

Well these files seem to get banished from the coming Windows Phone 7, internally still called Windows Mobile 7. The new files to replace the cabinets are called ‘.xap’ files. So what are the exact changes between the two files?

First of all, .xap files are nothing more than renamed .zip files. There are a number of possible .xml files that could be included inside the .xap. These determine things like required security access level, to tell the system which .dll contains the main() for the application, and more setup options. Initially, xap files will only be available for deployment through the Marketplace.

Because of the sometimes bad experiences from users about laggy and slow Stock ROMs, Microsoft added some very strict requirements for preloaded apps:

Originally posted by Da_G

Preloaded App Requirements (which will be distributed as .xap) as follows:

  • Maximum of 6 preloaded applications on the device, not to exceed 60MB
  • All preloaded apps must pass Marketplace submission process (some extended APIs are available to OEM/MO so the process is slightly relaxed in that regard)
  • The application(s) and all future updates must be free of charge.
  • The apps must launch without dependency on network availability.
  • The apps must persist through a “hard reset”.
  • The apps must be updatable and revocable (!!!!) through the Marketplace.
  • The apps must notify the user at first launch of any capabilities to be utilized and get user consent (to access compass, accelerometer, network, etc.)

Most of the requirements aren’t bad at all for the end-user, though I think the OEMs are probably not very happy with these requirements.

You can download an .xap file from the thread to examine it.


_________
Want something on the XDA Portal? Send us a tip!

ElCondor

ElCondor is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. View ElCondor's posts and articles here.
Mike McCrary · Jul 31, 2015 at 03:56 pm · 1 comment

CloudPlayer: DIY HiFi Music Streaming Solution

In our Helpful Guide to Music Streaming Services, we mentioned several different services that offer ways to stream catalogs of music directly to your device. While each service has their benefits and drawbacks, the common theme among them is to give you access to a vast library of music without the need to store your own, and charge you a monthly fee for the privilege. But what if you already had access to your own catalog of music? Sure, there...

XDA NEWS
GermainZ · Jul 31, 2015 at 01:03 pm · no comments

Optimize Battery Life with This Useful App

Battery life is an important aspect of your smartphone, especially if you use it for more than just calls on the go. Since you're on XDA, you probably do and want to get the most out of your battery. Now, you can't magically expand its size but no matter how much its capacity is, you should make sure it's not draining faster than it should be. Your phone's processor runs at different frequencies when you're using the device. The CPU...

XDA NEWS
Mario Tomás Serrafero · Jul 31, 2015 at 11:00 am · 3 comments

The OnePlus 2 & The Year of Smartphone Compromises

We are very close to entering the last third of 2015, and we have now seen many of the biggest flagship lines issue their latest iterations. Phones like the LG G4 and Galaxy S6 were some of the most anticipated devices in smartphone history, and the hype surrounding the M9 and OnePlus 2 had us discussing for weeks. But for the most part, the awe has vanished.   There is a feeling that virtually all of us at the XDA office...

XDA NEWS