Captainkrtek · Oct 24, 2010 at 09:31 pm

XDA Exclusive: Verizon’s LTE Upgrade Plans

Thanks to a source that will remain anonymous, we got our hands on some very detailed plans for Verizon’s new LTE Upgrade they are working on. The documents we have cover the very technical side of this network upgrade. We will try to put it in simple terms for the everyday user.

As quoted from the document, here is what LTE aims at:

  • Higher data rates: 300Mbps downlink & 75Mbps uplink
  • Shorter delay
  • Better efficiency
  • Better user experience
  • Lower deployment cost

Speeds like that seem to be very high goals even for Verizon. If they can reach those types of speeds, we would see such things at Multimedia Streaming take off. The speeds they plan to implement are currently faster than all other network types such as HSDPA and HSUPA.

For those interested in the more technical aspect of this part of the upgrade, read here:

  • LTE is a wireless data system. To suit the bursty nature of packet data, LTE systems plan to support data rates in excess of 300 Mbps on the downlink & 80 Mbps or more on the uplink.
  • To support the peak data rates needed to efficiently deliver bursty packet data, OFDMA based air interface is used, along with multiple antennas.
  • LTE systems need to minimize the latency experienced by packets going through the system to support packet data services that may be sensitive to delay.
  • Packet data is primarily IP traffic. To provide an efficient backhaul transport mechanism, IP-based transport mechanisms are used as part of the LTE architecture.
  • LTE is defined for a mobile wireless network environment. Since LTE is evolved from 3GPP-based networks, LTE supports inter-technology handovers between 3GPP technologies. LTE also supports interoperability and mobility from non-3GPP technologies as well.
  • LTE supports deployment on a range of bandwidths and spectrum. LTE defines both FDD and TDD modes, and supports a range of bandwidths from 1.4 MHz up to 20 MHz by using a scalable form of OFDMA.

This is just a brief run over of the speed of the network, as the documents we received are over 200+ pages. We will dig through all the jargon and try to pull out more readable information. Stay tuned!


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Captainkrtek

Captainkrtek is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. My name is Steven, Im a resident of Seattle Washington and an owner of a Droid Eris, Moto Droid 1, and an HTC Mega. I moderate 7 forums and am a News Writer for XDA. If you have any news tips or need help with your Android phone feel free to PM me! View Captainkrtek's posts and articles here.
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