Samantha · Apr 13, 2013 at 09:00 pm

XDA-University: Getting Started

A while back, we introduced XDA-University to the world, an ongoing project that aims to guide your steps in the world of Android development. Featuring a wealth of information, guides, hints, and tips on a variety of topics regarding Android and development, XDA-U serves to help beginners and experienced pros alike, from knowing how to root your first Android device to porting and building your own ROM. Today however, we’re going back to the basics with getting to know XDA and your first Android device.

Now, if you’re starting off as an overwhelmed newcomer on XDA, it’s recommended for you to check out the New Users’ Guide to XDA-Developers to help you get on your feet and start browsing a site as large as XDA. The guide breaks down many activities for which new users visit XDA, such as finding answers to questions and problems, showing appreciation for helpful replies and users in the form of the ‘Thanks’ button, finding the most likely place to get help, and a general explanation to the temporary restrictions placed on new forum users.

The New User’s Guide to Android is up next, with a simple but thorough explanation of all the necessary basics of Android, covering matters ranging from setting up the Google Account and importing contacts to the home launcher and the files systems to APKs and USB Debugging. It serves as a 101 for your mum or dad, friends and colleagues, or even you—anyone who may be starting out with this OS but doesn’t know where exactly to begin. The guide is also conveniently available in eBook and PDF format for those who prefer to view it offline.

So now that you have a grasp of the Android basics and XDA navigation, how do you use the resources found on XDA? What’s a flashable zip? How do you use RSD, Odin and Fastboot? Can you eat a bootloader and what does it taste like? Well, the answers to all your questions can be answered with the guide on using XDA resources. The guide explains what a flashable zip is and how to flash them onto your Android device, what to do with an SBF file with RSD, how to use TAR files, Odin and Fastboot, and what a bootloader tastes like.

Hopefully by now, you may know a little bit more than when you first started. And if you’re looking for help on more the more advanced development, you’re invited to check out more of XDA-University.


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Samantha

jman2131 is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. View jman2131's posts and articles here.
Mike McCrary · May 28, 2015 at 01:43 pm · 1 comment

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