jerdog · Apr 23, 2013 at 03:00 pm

Xperia Z Joins Sibling in the AOSP Mix

The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) is Google giving the entire community (manufacturers, enthusiasts, developers, etc.)  the necessary building blocks to bring what many refer to as “stock Android” (more accurately “vanilla Android”) to a device. The inherent problem with this is that the manufacturers are often the roadblock to such endeavors. Too often manufacturers (like HTC, Samsung, etc.) and suppliers (like Qualcomm) all claim that they can’t release certain drivers, and label them as “proprietary” so that no one can use them. Of course, since there’s nothing really “new” under the sun, this just serves to hinder innovation and development. And often times manufacturers will claim it’s the suppliers who are really hindering things, but who is it that chooses the suppliers? I’ll let the obvious rhetorical question be obvious.

In this mix, it’s refreshing to see a mainstream company attempt to shuck all of these trends and actually release the AOSP source for a device, with the Xperia S being the first non-Nexus device to be included in the AOSP device tree. This experiment ended on a positive note, with Sony moving the source for the Xperia S into their own managed GitHub repository. But Sony hasn’t stopped there.

While companies like Samsung, which used to be rather developer-friendly, now moving away from being open to the community, Sony instead is welcoming them with open arms. Their latest flagship device, the Xperia Z, has joined the Xperia S with having its AOSP source files available on their GitHub. They even posted a lot of information over on their Developer World blog, listing SD Card, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, LED light, and sensors working (partially), and they state plans to include NFC in the future. They also have a link to the proprietary Qualcomm binaries needed in order for this to work. You can see the video below, and visit their blog post for more information.


_________
Want something on the XDA Portal? Send us a tip!

jerdog

jerdog is an editor on XDA-Developers, the largest community for Android users. Jeremy has been an XDA member since 2007, and has been involved in technology in one way or another, dating back to when he was 8 years old and was given his first PC in 1984 - which promptly got formatted. It was a match made in the stars, and he never looked back. He has owned, to date, over 60 mobile devices over the last 15 years and mobile technology just clicks with him. In addition to being a News Editor and OEM Relations Manager, he is a Senior Moderator and member of the Developer and Moderator Committees at XDA. View jerdog's posts and articles here.
Mathew Brack · May 25, 2015 at 06:00 am · 5 comments

Android M Code Name: Macadamia Nut Cookie

While the official name for the latest iteration of Android has yet to be revealed, the code name used internally by Google has been seen to be Macadamia Nut Cookie (MNC). This will almost certainly not be the final name for the release with rumors so far leaning towards milkshake, much like Key Lime Pie became Kit Kat and Lemon Meringue Pie became Lollipop. The acronym MNC has now also started to appear in several locations in AOSP, just look out...

XDA NEWS
Chris Gilliam · May 24, 2015 at 03:59 pm · 3 comments

XDA Recap: This Week In Android (May 17 – 23)

Another week, another recap. The Sunday tradition marches on this week with a fresh no-nonsense look at big-picture news. Here in the digital XDA writers’ room, we spend our days pouring over an average of 2,500 news items and forum threads every 24 hours. Only the most timely and interesting bits survive the editing process, but the portal’s front page still sees weekly counts in excess of 100 posts. This is a glut of content to absorb, especially if following...

XDA NEWS
Mario Tomás Serrafero · May 24, 2015 at 11:00 am · 1 comment

Sunday Debate: Are Smaller Bezels Better or Worth It?

Bezels have been getting smaller and smaller as the years go by, and while devices from 2011 needed to trim some fat, there is no absolute rule that says that smaller bezels, after a happy medium, are beneficial to a phone. Part of this is that, with today’s current smartphone paradigms, an absolute lack of bezels does not produce an inherently better user experience.   With each technological advancement come limitations and compromises of some sort, and bezels are not...

XDA NEWS
Share This