New Range of Flexible Implantable Devices To Launch Later This Month

New Range of Flexible Implantable Devices To Launch Later This Month

Ever increasingly popular bio-modding company Dangerous Things is planning to launch a new range of flat, flexible, bio-safe implantable NFC tags at CeBIT, Germany later this month. Insiders of the implant community were treated to a preview of the new FlexNT NFC tag (see above) recently however, which is based on the NTAG216 but with significantly improved performance and choice of installation locations. Meaning this could well be a major step forward in biohacking for those of us who use NFC tags along side our Android devices. This will not be the first time the company has released NFC capable implants, they currently offer a line of non-flexible implants about the size of a grain of rice. Additional devices based on this new flexible manufacturing technique will soon be available later this year, with a major announcement to be made at CeBIT on March 16th.

 

nfcchip
The current generation of tags can be implanted by making a small incision with a scalpel or via injection with a syringe pre-loaded with the device, a process that takes seconds. It is doubtful the new tags will ever be able to be injected due their size and shape although any competent body modification professional should be able to perform the procedure. The concept of implanting an NFC tag inside your hand (usual placement) may seem alien to many of our readers however, the idea is catching on in many areas, for example some companies have started offering them as an optional alternative to security cards.
 The following is a list of the current RFID/NFC implants Dangerous Sells and has been taken directly from their store page to ensure accuracy.

xEM 125khz EM4102
The xEM is a low frequency 125khz transponder based on the EM4102 chip which has no user programmable memory or security features. Each xEM tag is programmed at the factory with a unique ID that cannot be changed, and it works with common EM41xx based readers available through many hobby electronics shops and electronics outlets. Several commercial systems can also read and work with the xEM tag, however we offer it as a “starter” implant for people new to RFID in general. The xEM is low cost, simple to use, and we also sell an xEM Access Control unit that works beautifully with the xEM tag that enables hobbyists to cheaply and easily build simple access control type projects.

xNT 13.56mhz NTAG216
The xNT is a high frequency 13.56mhz transponder based on the NTAG216 chip. The NTAG216 has 888 bytes of user programmable memory, 32 bit password protection security features, and is both ISO14443A and NFC Type 2 compliant. You can use the xNT with both commercial systems that work with ISO14443A as well as NFC devices like mobile phones and new ISO14443A and NFC hobby electronics as well. There are several hobby electronics readers and reader kits available, including one we sell, that work with Arduino and other micro-controllers commonly used by hobbyists and product engineers alike.

xM1 13.56mhz S50 (Mifare Classic 1K)
The xM1 is a high frequency 13.56mhz transponder based on the Mifare Classic S50 1K chip. This chip type is ISO14443A compliant but is not NFC compliant. The xM1 has 768 bytes of user programmable memory and also supports Crypto1 security features. The xM1 is supported only on some NFC devices which contain a reader chip from NXP. While the xM1 will work with any ISO14443A reader, including our PN532 reader, it cannot be expected to work reliably with all NFC devices. We supply the xM1 for people who have a specific need for this particular chip type.

xIC 13.56mhz ICode SLI
The xM1 is a high frequency 13.56mhz transponder based on the ICODE SLI chip. This chip type is ISO15693 compliant but is not NFC compliant. The xIC has 128 bytes of user programmable memory but has no security features. The xIC is supported only on some NFC devices which contain a reader chip from NXP. While the xIC will work with any ISO15693 proximity reader, it cannot be expected to work reliably with all NFC devices. We supply the xIC for people who have a specific need for this particular chip type.

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The story of how yours truly ended up having an NFC tag implanted inside his hand can be found here and includes the full journey from what made me first consider one, to purchasing and approaching a body modification professional and even includes a list of what they and be used for. Be sure to stay tuned during CeBIT on the 14th – 18th March for more details on this new generation of implants.

XDA’s NFC Implant Thread
Would you consider an NFC implant? Leave a comment below!
 

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