Acer announces the sustainability-focused Chromebook Vero 514

Acer announces the sustainability-focused Chromebook Vero 514

Acer has announced the latest member of its sustainability-focused brand, the Chromebook Vero 514, which is also the first Vero-branded Chromebook in the company’s lineup. Acer introduced the first Vero laptop with the Acer Aspire Vero in 2021, and a few more models have been introduced since then, but this is the first one powered by Google’s Chrome OS.

In line with its environmentally-conscious design, the laptop uses 30% post-consumer recycled plastic (PCR) in the chassis, 50% PCR in the keycaps, and 100% ocean-bound plastics for the surface of the touchpad, plus the cardboard packaging uses 90% recycled paper. The exterior of the laptop also uses a paint-free chassis, and the display panel is 99% recyclable, so sustainability is definitely a big focus here.

XDA VIDEO OF THE DAY

Two Acer Chromebook Vero 514 laptops back to back, showing both sides as well as the front and back of the laptop

The Acer Chromebook Vero 514 also doesn’t skimp out on specs, though. It’ll be available with up to an Intel Core i7-1255U, so it’s packing the latest and greatest on that front Plus, it has up to 16GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD. The first configuration available in the US isn’t quite that powerful, though. It will be powered by an Intel Core i3-1215U, 8GB of RAM, and a 128GB SSD, which is still a solid combination for a mid-range Chromebook. It also has a 14-inch display with Full HD resolution, and in some markets (not the US), touch support.

It even includes niceties like a fingerprint reader for biometric authentication, as well as a Full HD webcam for video calls. Plus, the chassis still meets MIL-STD-810H military standards for durability, so there aren’t a ton of compromises being made here.

The US configuration of the Acer Chromebook Vero 514 will be available starting in mid-October at Best Buy, and it will cost $499.99, which is frankly not a terrible price for a laptop with these specs. You’re not paying a huge premium for the sustainable design, which makes this device all the more interesting.

About author

João Carrasqueira
João Carrasqueira

Editor at XDA Computing. I've been covering the world of technology since 2018, but I've loved the field for a lot longer. And I have a weird affinity for Nintendo videogames, which I'm always happy to talk about.

We are reader supported. External links may earn us a commission.