AMD Ryzen 5000G series with integrated graphics goes official for OEMs, full-release later this year

AMD Ryzen 5000G series with integrated graphics goes official for OEMs, full-release later this year

AMD has just released the Ryzen 5000G APUs featuring the same Zen 3 architecture as the regular Ryzen 5000 series, but now with integrated graphics. These are primarily low-to-mid-range processors with up to 8-cores and integrated Vega 8 graphics. Notably, these new chips will only be available for pre-built systems by OEMs and other system integrators at the moment. However, AMD does plan to release these chips later for consumers and DIY PC builders.

The new Ryzen 5000G series includes three models available in two TDP (Thermal design power) variants, which means a total of six processors to choose from. They are built on TSMC’s 7nm process, and as mentioned before, up to eight Zen 3 cores with Vega 8 graphics. These will also support 24 lanes of PCIe 3.0 and support DDR4-3200 memory.

The series is led by the Ryzen 7 5700G, an octa-core processor with 16-threads and clock speeds of 3.8GHz with peak turbo speeds of 4.6GHz and a 65W TDP. Next, we have the Ryzen 5 5600G, which comes with a six-core configuration with 12-threads, 3.9GHz clock speed, and turbo speeds of 4.4GHz. Lastly, the Ryzen 5 5300G comes with only 4 cores and 8-threads running at base clock speeds of 4GHz going up to 4.2GHz. All three of the 5000G series processors will have 5000GE counterparts configured with lower 35W TDP, which means lower base frequencies and assumingly lower sustained power. AMD says that these processors will be compatible with X570, B550, and A520 motherboards, while X470 and B450 motherboards might also be supported, depending on the manufacturer.

AMD Ryzen 5000G APUs

The integrated graphics are probably the most disappointing part as we once again have Vega 8 graphics. AMD does mention that the jump from 12nm to 7nm has enabled the company to increase the clock speeds from 1400 MHz to 2100 MHz, and the 8 compute units perform better than the 11 compute units on the older 12nm based Vega graphics. Don’t expect the integrated graphics on the new APUs to deliver impressive performance, especially if you are going to compare it with the latest Iris Xe graphics available on the 11th-gen Intel processors.

AMD’s new 5000G APUs are already making their way into pre-built systems by Dell, HP, and other manufacturers. Pricing has not been shared at the moment, but AMD should share it later in the year once it plans to make these chips directly available to consumers.

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Kunal Khullar
Kunal Khullar

PC building enthusiast currently exploring the gaming industry. My love for tech began at an early age and I also have a keen interest in photography, music, PUBG Mobile, automobiles and a knack for keeping things clean. Email: [email protected]