AMD Ryzen 7 5700X vs Ryzen 7 5800X: Which CPU is better?

AMD Ryzen 7 5700X vs Ryzen 7 5800X: Which CPU is better?

The Ryzen 7 5700X is one of the new CPUs that AMD announced recently alongside its first 3D V-cache CPU, the Ryzen 7 5800X3D. While it’s not a top-of-the-line CPU in Ryzen 5000 series, we think it’s still a solid option to consider for your next PC build. In this article, we’re going to take a look at the AMD Ryzen 7 5700X vs Ryzen 7 5800X comparison to find out which CPU you should consider buying for your next PC.

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Specifications

Before we begin the comparison, here’s a quick look at the specifications table to see what each of these CPUs bring to the table:

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Specification AMD Ryzen 7 5700X AMD Ryzen 7 5800X
CPU Socket AMD AM4 AMD AM4
Cores 8 8
Threads 16 16
Lithography TSMC 7nm FinFET TSMC 7nm FinFET
Base Frequency 3.4GHz 3.8GHz
Boost Frequency Up to 4.6GHz Up to 4.7GHz
Unlocked for overclocking? Yes Yes
L3 Cache 32MB 32MB
Default TDP 65W 105W
Max. Operating Temperature (Tjmax) 90°C 90°C
Memory Support DDR4-3200
Up to 128GB
DDR4 up to 3200MHz
Up to 128GB
Integrated Graphics NA NA

AMD Ryzen 7 5700x vs 5800x: Performance

The Ryzen 7 5700X’s specs, as you can see, are very similar to that of the Ryzen 7 5800X. The 5700X has 8 cores and 16 threads, and we’re looking at a base and boost frequency of 3.4GHz and up to 4.6GHz, respectively. There’s a noticeable difference in the base clock, but not much when it comes to the boost frequency. You’ll also notice how the Ryzen 7 5700X tops out at 65W TDP as opposed to 105W for the Ryzen 7 5800X processor. This means the new chip is going to be extremely efficient in select applications such as Blender or some other similarly threaded tasks.

The Ryzen 7 5700X is essentially identical to AMD’s Ryzen 7 5800 (non-X variant) which is exclusive to OEMs. The 5800 (non-X) is also an 8 core, 16 thread CPU with a 65W default TDP. Despite the lower TDP rating, however, the R7 5800 (non-X) matches the general performance of the R7 5800X. We expect to see a similar level of performance from the Ryzen 7 5700X going head-to-head against the Ryzen 7 5800X.

Ryzen 7 5800X processor

Another thing that’s worth pointing out about the Ryzen 7 5700X is that it’s an unlocked chip which means you can overclock it and get more performance out of it. While the Ryzen 7 5800 (non-X) was also unlocked for overclocking, it wasn’t able to produce the best results going against a fully overclocked R7 5800X. It’ll be interesting to see if the Ryzen 7 5700X will be able to perform any better when you tweak the settings.

We also expect the Ryzen 7 5700X to perform well when it comes to gaming. If the Ryzen 7 5800 (non-K) performance was any indication, we think the Ryzen 7 5700X should be able to handle just about any modern AAA title without any issues. But we’d like to point out that the Ryzen 7 5700X doesn’t come with integrated graphics, which means you’ll have to add a discrete GPU to get it up and running. If you are on the lookout for a basic gaming rig to run casual games, then do check out the Ryzen 7 5700G which comes with its own graphics.

Before we wrap up the performance section, we think it’s worth mentioning that the Ryzen 7 5700X doesn’t come with a stock CPU cooler. This isn’t all that surprising because the Ryzen 7 5800X didn’t come with a stock cooler either, so you’ll have to spend more on a third-party CPU cooler. We suggest you take a look at our collection of the best CPU coolers to find some good options if you are planning to buy one of these processors. Both processors have a maximum operating temperature of 90°C, so no differences there.

Pricing and Availability

AMD has launched the Ryzen 7 5700X for $299 which puts right below the Ryzen 7 5800X in the pricing charts. You can buy a new Ryzen 7 5800X for $359 right now, which means we’re looking at a price difference of around $60. That being said, the Ryzen 7 5800X is now available to purchase whereas you’ll have to wait till April 4 to get your hands on the new Ryzen 7 5700X. Alternatively, you can take a look at the Ryzen 7 5700G, which is now available for $309 at the time of writing this article.

    The Ryzen 7 5800X is what we think is the best gaming CPU you can buy from the house of AMD. It offers impressive performance for gaming as well as content creation, making it a fantastic mainstream CPU overall.

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    AMD Ryzen 7 5700G is your best bet if you want to build a budget gaming PC right now without having to spend a lot of money on a discrete GPU.

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We’re leaving links to buy the Ryzen 7 5800X and the Ryzen 7 5700G for now. We’ll add a link to buy the Ryzen 7 5700X once it goes on sale on April 4, so keep an eye on this space.

AMD Ryzen 7 5700x vs 5800x: Which one should you buy?

While we haven’t had a chance to test both the CPUs for a head-to-head comparison just yet, we think the Ryzen 7 5700X should come close to matching the general performance of the Ryzen 7 5800X. If anything, this new 65W TDP processor is going to be more power-efficient than the 5800X, just like the Ryzen 7 5800 (non-K) variant. The Ryzen 7 5800X is a great option if you are looking for the absolute best performance and don’t mind paying slightly higher. But if you don’t mind the slightly slower clock speeds, we think you can’t go wrong with the cheaper Ryzen 7 5700X.

For around $60 less, the Ryzen 7 5700X offers the same level of performance in most tasks while consuming significantly less power. You can also overclock the chip further to increase the overall performance. But you will need a good quality CPU cooler as the 5700X isn’t bundled with a stock cooler. If you’re not interested in either of these chips, then we suggest you take a look at our collection of the best CPUs to find some good options. You can also take a look at the Ryzen 6000 series mobile CPUs to see what AMD’s been up to in the mobile computing space. Additionally, the company is also launching the new AMD Ryzen 7000 series desktop processors later this year, so be sure to keep an eye out for those CPUs too.

About author

Karthik Iyer
Karthik Iyer

Karthik covers PC hardware for XDA Computing. When not at work, you will find him yelling at his monitors while playing video games.

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