Android 13 might let users define language settings on a per-app basis

Android 13 might let users define language settings on a per-app basis

Months before Google rolled out the first stable build of Android 12 to the Pixel lineup, we started seeing information about the next major Android upgrade — Android 13. We first learned Android 13’s dessert name — Tiramisu — back in July this year, shortly after Google released Android 12 Beta 3.1 for its Pixel phones. Then we saw evidence to suggest that Android 13 might let secondary profiles make NFC payments. In September, we spotted a code change in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) suggesting that Google was working on adding native support for another private DNS standard in Android 13. And, earlier this week, we learned that Android 13 might bring full support for Bluetooth LE Audio.

While we’re still months away from the first Android 13 developer preview release, more information about the next major Android upgrade has now surfaced online. A recent report from Android Police reveals that Google is working on a new feature, codenamed ‘Panlingual’, for Android 13 that will let users define language settings on a per-app basis. An unnamed source with information about the feature has told the publication that it will let users specify language settings for each app on their device, which will prove to be quite useful for multilingual users.

The report reveals that the feature will appear as a new “App languages” option within the “Languages & input” settings, but users will also be able to access it from the “App info” screen. However, since the feature is currently in its early stages of development, Google might change this implementation at a later stage.

While some apps (like Google Maps) already give users the option to change the internal language settings, most others currently rely on the system-wide language setting. However, with the upcoming feature, multilingual users will get the option to change the language on a per-app basis. Essentially, this will let you browse through Twitter in one language and get work done in Google Docs in a different language.

It’s worth noting that the upcoming feature might not work as intended on apps that only support one language. However, Google could make use of Android 12’s new translation API to automate the process of translating an app’s resources without requiring the developer to add support for more languages. We spotted some evidence pointing towards such an implementation in an APK teardown earlier this year. You can learn more about the translation service in our previous coverage.

About author

Pranob Mehrotra
Pranob Mehrotra

A Literature and Linguistics graduate with a keen interest in everything Android. When not writing about tech, Pranob spends most of his time either playing League of Legends or lurking on Reddit.