Apple has reportedly given up on making an iPad Pro with a glass back

Apple has reportedly given up on making an iPad Pro with a glass back

The iPad Pro 2021 is an impressive tablet, with high-end hardware and enough productivity software to replace a laptop for some people. However, the aluminum body won’t work well with the MagSafe charging technology that Apple has adopted on its mobile devices. According to a new report, Apple was experimenting with an iPad Pro that had an all-glass back cover, but the idea has supposedly been dropped.

Apple has been developing prototypes for a future iPad Pro with glass back covers, as reported by Bloomberg in June of last year, which could have allowed easy wireless charging. However, in what is likely a surprise to no one, the all-glass iPads were more fragile and easy to shatter. A new report from 9to5Mac claims Apple has now scrapped that idea, and is currently experimenting with a different approach.

Apple is now allegedly experimenting with an iPad Pro that has a larger Apple logo made of glass, which could be used to transfer power from a MagSafe charger. The prototype also apparently has stronger magnets than on the iPhone and a higher maximum charging speed — MagSafe on the iPhone currently tops out at 15W (or 12W on the iPhone 12 Mini).

9to5Mac also believes the next iPad Pro will include a larger battery, a camera module similar to the iPhone 13’s camera array, and a new System-on-a-Chip (SoC). The new chip might be the Apple M2, which is also rumored to show up in a MacBook Air revision sometime this year.

The current iPad Pro 2021 is sold in both 11-inch and 12.9-inch sizes, both with IPS displays, Apple M1 chips, up to 2TB of storage and 16GB RAM, 20W USB Type-C charging, Thunderbolt 3, FaceID, multiple rear cameras, Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5.0, optional LTE and 5G connectivity, and Apple’s iPadOS software. The M1 chip is also found in the current MacBook Air and iMac 24-inch.

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Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. He's also the host of the Tech Tales podcast, which explores the history of the technology industry. Follow him on Twitter at @corbindavenport.