Buying the highest-end Mac Studio will cost you nearly $8,000

Buying the highest-end Mac Studio will cost you nearly $8,000

Apple just revealed several new Mac models, including the most powerful Apple Silicon computer yet, the Mac Studio. It has a similar form factor as the Mac Mini, but with a taller design and much more powerful internals. How powerful, you may ask? Well, maxing out every available option will set you back nearly $8,000.

The Apple Store product listing for the Mac Studio just went live, and Apple has a few configuration options available. You can buy it with a 48 or 64-core GPU, and 64 or 128GB of unified memory (which is shared across conventional RAM and video memory). Apple has four storage options available: 1TB, 2TB, 4TB, and 8TB. There is no keyboard, mouse, or other accessory included in the box: just the Mac Studio and a power cord.

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Maxing out all available options brings the final total to a whopping $7,999.00. That’s far from the most expensive Mac hardware configuration to date — a top-of-the-line Mac Pro in 2019 would have cost you $52,199 — it’s certainly pricey. The official release date is March 18, but shipping dates are already exceeding that timeline, as of the time of writing.

Before you balk at the pricing as another example of Apple’s price gouging, like the infamous $999 monitor stand that the company is still selling, the Mac Studio is a high-end workstation. It’s intended for graphics-intensive modeling design and video editing, not Microsoft Word or a few rounds of Among Us. Windows-powered PC workstations for the same tasks are easily in the same price range, and as previously mentioned, Apple itself has sold more expensive computers in recent history.

The starting price for the Mac Studio is a much more affordable $1,999.00 for 32GB of unified memory, 512GB of SSD storage, and an M1 Max chipset with a 10-core CPU and 24-core GPU. You still don’t get any accessories in the box, though.

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Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer. Check out what he's up to at corbin.io.

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