Automatically Power Off Your Car-Mounted Tablet or Smartphone with AutoSleeper

Automatically Power Off Your Car-Mounted Tablet or Smartphone with AutoSleeper

Let’s face it. Not all of us own cars featuring fancy, built-in touch screen navigation systems. Regardless of the high initial expense, these systems are often quite cumbersome and underpowered, at least when compared to our modern mobile devices. Because of this, many instead choose to permanently mount their Android-powered tablets to their dashboards.

While using your Android-powered tablet as a car computer works quite well for the most part, there are a few lingering inconveniences in doing so. Perhaps the biggest one is manually powering on and off your device. Luckily, XDA Forum Member gdort2 created AutoSleeper to make this a thing of the past.

As its name implies, AutoSleeper automatically wakes and puts your device to sleep—and it does so when you turn on and off your car. You may be wondering how exactly it’s able to do this without any proprietary hardware, but it’s rather simple. When the device senses that it’s connected to external power, the app turns on your display. Then when the power is removed, the app turns off your display. This method works quite well, as the vast majority of cars cut 12V power when the engine is turned off, and only turn it back on when you turn on the car or put it in ACC mode. And on the Android side of things, all you have to do is give the app Device Administrator privileges so that it can lock and wake your device.

If you’ve got an Android-powered car computer or want to set one up, make your way to the application thread and give AutoSleeper a shot. Then while you’re at it, try the Torque app, along with one of those fun little ELM327 modules.

About author

Will Verduzco
Will Verduzco

Will Verduzco is the former Editor-in-Chief and Portal Administrator of the XDA-Developers Portal. He has been addicted to mobile technology since the HTC Wizard. But starting with the Nexus One, his gadget love affair shifted to Google's little green robot. You can now find Will writing for the Swappa Blog, though he still pops up on XDA from time to time.