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Best pens for the Surface Pro 8 in 2022

Best pens for the Surface Pro 8 in 2022

The recently-announced Surface Pro 8 promises to be a very exciting device for various reasons. It’s the first big redesign the Surface Pro line has received in years, it adds a 120Hz refresh rate display, and it finally brings Thunderbolt support to the Surface family. Another big new feature is the Surface Slim Pen 2, which is going to give you haptic feedback to make it feel like you’re writing on paper with the Surface Pro 8.

This is a feature that only works with this new pen, so it’s probably the best pen experience you’re going to get on the Surface Pro 8. But what if that price tag is a little too steep for you and you don’t care about that feature? Or what if you find the design uncomfortable? The Surface Pro 8 and most Windows tablets support the Microsoft Pen Protocol, so while the Surface Slim Pen 2 is the most natural fit, there are actually lots of pens you can use with it. We’ve rounded up some of the best options available so you can choose something that fits your budget.

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    The perfect fit

    The Surface Slim Pen 2 is going to give you the bext experience writing and drawing on the Surface Pro 8. It has a finer tip and haptic feedback that feels like using a pen on paper.

    Official Microsoft alternative

    The classic Surface Pen is still a fantastic pen experience for the Surface Pro 8. It has 4,096 levels of pressure, tilt support, and a more rounded design you might prefer.

    Pen with dual eraser

    The latest model from Renaisser comes with a dual eraser, so you can use the button on the side or the tail end of the pen to erase. Plus, it has 4,096 levels of pressure and tilt support.

    Affordable and reliable

    The Dell Active Pen is a more affordable pen option, featuring 1,024 levels of pressure. It uses the Microsoft Pen Protocol, but it doesn't support Bluetooth for custom actions.

    Fully featured and cheap

    The RENAISSER Stylus Pen has all the premium features you'd expect, including Bluetooth 5.1, 4096 levels of pressure, and tilt support at an affordable price.

    Extra cheap

    The Uogic Pen for Surface devices is one of the cheapest alternatives if you're looking for a basic active pen. It has 1,024 levels of pressure and replaceable pen tips.

    The best of both worlds

    The Wacom Bamboo Ink Plus is a premium pen that supports both the Microsoft Pen Protocol and AES input, meaning you can use it with more devices.

    Affordable Wacom AES and MPP

    The standard Wacom Bamboo Ink still supports both MPP and AES protocols and has 4,096 levels of pressure, so it's still a great experience but more affordable.

    The absolute basics

    If you don't need an active pen or any fancy features, the Digiroot stylus gives you a bit more precision for drawing and writing if you don't want to spend a lot of money.

Those are the best pens you can buy right now for the Surface Pro 8. There’s a good range of price points, features, and brands out there, so you can find something that fits your style. As we’ve mentioned, the Surface Slim Pen 2 will give you the most complete experience on the Surface Pro 8, but you can save some money by going with something like the RENAISSER Stylus Pen, which is still fully featured.

If you haven’t yet, you can buy the Surface Pro 8 below to be one of the first to get it. Plus, You can get the Surface Pro Signature Keyboard with the Surface Slim Pen 2 included so you get a full laptop and pen experience. It’s worth noting that the pen charges wirelessly in the keyboard.

    The Surface Pro 8 is Microsoft's flagship tablet, and it comes with an all-new design, a 120Hz display, Thunderbolt 4, and more.
    The Surface Pro Signature Keyboard complements the Surface Pro 8 with a keyboard and trackpad to make it feel more like a laptop. This bundle also includes the Surface Slim Pen 2.

About author

João Carrasqueira
João Carrasqueira

Editor at XDA Computing. I've been covering the world of technology since 2018, but I've loved the field for a lot longer. And I have a weird affinity for Nintendo videogames, which I'm always happy to talk about.

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