Chainfire Releases Source Code for suhide, SuperSU’s SafetyNet-Hiding Addon

Chainfire Releases Source Code for suhide, SuperSU’s SafetyNet-Hiding Addon

These past 2 weeks have been quite a ride for root lovers. First, we got a new Magisk update, which features complete Google Pixel and A/B partition scheme support. Then, we got a minor SuperSU update, which fixes a bug with Android Oreo on the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL, only to receive sad news days later that Chainfire¬†was retiring from SuperSU development as a whole. Now, we’re getting some really unexpected news for suhide – coming from Chainfire as well.

suhide, the flashable addon which allows SuperSU users to pass the SafetyNet tamper check on Android phones, has been open sourced – meaning that the source code is now available on GitHub under the Apache License 2.0 for everyone to freely download it, modify it and compile it at will. This is pretty surprising, especially considering how SuperSU itself has been historically known for being closed-source software during the totality of its run. But this also means that SuperSU’s new owners (and now developers), Coding Code Mobile Technology (CCMT), are totally alright with open source software, taking into account that the GitHub description explicitly says that the source code was published with CCMT’s permission.

If you’d like to have a read at the source code or compile it yourself, you can go to the GitHub page to read more, and check out the official XDA thread for more information on suhide. It’s not clear whether this move signifies something bigger – after all, this is actually the first SuperSU-related big news following the CCMT development takeover. While this won’t bulge some people’s distrust for CCMT, we’re really excited to see open source software development growing bigger and bigger every time, so suhide¬†is a welcome addition to the FOSS family. If you want to check it out, follow the link in the button below.


Source: GitHub

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