Crunchyroll streaming service now available on the Nintendo Switch

Crunchyroll streaming service now available on the Nintendo Switch

The Nintendo Switch has been around for nearly five years, and even as total sales eclipse the Nintendo Wii, most streaming services still don’t seem to interested in porting their applications to the console. Twitch, YouTube, and Hulu are still the only services with Switch apps (plus Niconico in Japan), but now another is joining the party: Crunchyroll.

“There’s officially a brand new way to watch Crunchyroll,” the company announced on Thursday in a blog post (via The Verge), “and it’s right in the palm of your hands. The Crunchyroll app is now available on Nintendo Switch, so you can stream all of your favorite anime on TV while your console is docked, or on the go with handheld and tabletop modes.”

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The product page on the Nintendo Switch eShop reveals the application is a 110MB download, so it shouldn’t take up too much room on your Switch’s internal storage or SD card. The app is available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Italian, and Russian. Thankfully, the Switch Pro Controller is fully supported, which technically gives it points over Nintendo’s own Super Mario Party.

Crunchyroll is one of the largest streaming/video services for anime content. It surpassed 5 million subscribers in 2021, with over 120 million registered users at the same time. Just like Disney+, Hulu, Netflix, and most other streaming platforms, Crunchyroll’s library is a combination of licensed shows/films (such as One Piece, Attack on Titan, Black Clover, to name a few in the US) and original content. The company also has applications available for iOS, Android, PlayStation 4, Wii U, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, PS Vita, Xbox 360, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and even Windows Phone.

Sony’s Funimation subsidiary completed its acquisition of Crunchyroll for a whopping $1.175 billion last year. That’s about 0.02% of what Microsoft just paid for Activision Blizzard, or roughly 33% of what Sony is paying for Bungie.

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Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer. Check out what he's up to at corbin.io.

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