Dell Latitude 5430 vs Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3: Battle of business laptops

Dell Latitude 5430 vs Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3: Battle of business laptops

As we approach the middle of the year, most major PC companies have refreshed their best laptops with the latest processors from Intel and/or AMD. That means there’s quite a lot of choice if you want to buy a new laptop today, but it also means it can be hard to choose the right device for you. We’re here to help, and today, we’re comparing the Dell Latitude 5430 and the Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3, two business laptops geared towards a more mainstream audience.

What that means is that these laptops aren’t exactly focused on delivering the most premium experience or featuring an ultra-light design. These are business laptops focused on nailing the basics at a more reasonable price point, keeping the things that matter the most to business users. While they’re similar in their goals, the Dell Latitude 5430 and the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 have quite a few differences, so let’s take a look at what makes each of them tick to help you decide what’s best for you.

XDA VIDEO OF THE DAY

Navigate this article:

Dell Latitude 5430 vs Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3: Specs

Dell Latitude 5430 Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3
Operating system
  • Windows 11
  • Ubuntu (Laptop only)
  • Windows 11
CPU
  • 12th-generation Intel Core i3-1215U (6 cores, 8 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 10MB cache)
  • 12th-generation Intel Core i5-1235U vPro Essentials (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 12MB cache)
  • 12th-generation Intel Core i5-1245U vPro Enterprise (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 12MB cache)
  • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1255U vPro Essentials (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.7GHz, 12MB cache)
  • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1265U vPro Enterprise (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.8GHz, 12MB cache)
  • Up to 11th Generation Intel Core i5 (U15) with vPro (unspecified SKUs)
  • Intel
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i5-1235U (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 12MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i5-1245U (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 12MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1255U (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.7GHz, 12MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1265U (10 cores, 12 threads, up to 4.8GHz, 12MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i5-1240P (12 cores, 16 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 12MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i5-1250P (12 cores, 16 threads, up to 4.4GHz, 12MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1260P (12 cores, 16 threads, up to 4.7GHz, 18MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1270P (12 cores, 16 threads, up to 4.8GHz, 18MB cache)
    • 12th-generation Intel Core i7-1280P (14 cores, 20 threads, up to 4.8GHz, 24MB cache)
  • AMD
    • Up to AMD Ryzen 6000 PRO processors (20W)
Graphics
  • Intel UHD Graphics (Core i3)
  • Intel Iris Xe graphics (Core i5/i7)
  • Intel:
    • Integrated
      • Intel UHD graphics (Core i3)
      • Intel Iris Xe (Core i5/Core i7)
    • Discrete (optional)
      • NVIDIA GeForce MX550
      • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2050
  • AMD
    • AMD Radeon Graphics 600M (integrated)
Display
  • 14-inch 16:9 HD (1366 x 768), anti-glare, 220 nits, 45% NTSC
  • 14-inch 16:9 FHD (1920 x 1080), anti-glare, 250 nits, 45% NTSC
  • 14-inch 16:9 FHD (1920 x 1080), anti-glare, 300 nits, 100% NTSC, touch
  • 14-inch 16:9 FHD (1920 x 1080), anti-reflective, anti-smudge, 400 nits, 100% sRGB, Super Low Power
  • 14-inch 16:9 FHD (1920 x 1080), anti-glare, 300 nits, 100% sRGB, SafeScreen (privacy screen), touch
  • 14-inch 16:10 Full HD+ (1920 x 1200) IPS, anti-glare, 300 nits
  • 14-inch 16:10 Full HD+ (1920 x 1200) IPS, anti-glare, 300 nits, touch
  • 14-inch 16:10 Full HD+ (1920 x 1200) IPS, low power, anti-glare, 400 nits, 100% sRGB
  • 14-inch 16:10 Full HD+ (1920 x 1200) IPS, Privacy Guard, anti-glare, 500nits, 100% sRGB
  • 14-inch 16:10 2.2K (2240×1400) IPS, anti-glare, 300nits
  • 14-inch 16:10 Ultra HD+ (3840 x 2400) IPS, anti-glare, anti-reflection, anti-smudge, 500nits, 100% DCI-P3, HDR 400, Dolby Vision, touch (AOFT)
Storage
  • 256GB PCIe NVMe SSD, Class 35
  • 512GB PCIe NVMe SSD, Class 35/Class 40
  • 1TB PCIe NVMe SSD, Class 35/Class 40
    • Optional self-encrypting drive (OPAL2)
  • 2TB PCIe NVMe SSD, Class 40
  • Up to 2TB PCIe NVMe SSD
RAM
  • 4GB DDR4 3200MHz single-channel
  • 8GB DDR4 3200MHz single-channel/dual-channel
  • 16GB DDR4 3200MHz single-channel/dual-channel
  • 32GB DDR4 3200MHz dual-channel
  • 64GB DDR4 3200MHz dual-channel
  • Intel:
    • Up to 48GB DDR4 dual-channel (8/16GB soldered + up to 32GB SODIMM)
  • AMD:
    • Up to 32GB LPDDR5 6400MHz dual-channel (soldered)
Battery
  • 3-cell 41Whr battery
  • 4-cell 58Whr battery
    • Up to 90W USB Type-C power adapter
  • 39.3Whr battery (integrated graphics only)
  • 52.5Whr battery
Ports
  • 2 x Thunderbolt 4 (USB Type-C)
  • 2 x USB 3.2 Gen 1 Type-A
  • 1 x HDMI 2.0
  • RJ45 Ethernet
  • 3.5mm headphone jack
  • microSD card reader
  • Nano SIM slot (optional)
  • Intel: 2 x Thunderbolt 4 / USB Type-C
  • AMD: 2 x USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C
  • 2 x USB Type-A (USB 3.2 Gen 1)
  • 1 x HDMI 2.0b
  • 1 x RJ45 Ethernet
  • 3.5mm combo headphone jack
  • SIM card slot
Audio
  • Dual high-quality speakers, Waves MaxxAudio Pro
  • Dual noise canceling microphones
  • Dolby Audio speaker system with Dolby Voice
  • Dual microphones
Camera
  • 720p HD webcam with shutter
  • 1080p Full HD + IR camera with shutter, Dell Express Sign-In
  • 1080p Full HD + IR camera with shutter Dell Express Sign-In, Intelligent Privacy, Ambient Light Sensor
  • 720p HD camera
  • 1080p Full HD camera
  • 1080p Full HD camera + IR camera
Windows Hello
  • IR webcam (optional)
  • Fingerprint sensor (optional)
  • IR webcam (optional)
  • Fingerprint reader in power button
Connectivity
  • Wi-Fi 6E
  • Bluetooth 5.2
  • Optional: 4G LTE Cat9 (Intel XMM 7360)
  • Intel Wi-Fi 6E
  • Bluetooth 5.2
  • Cellular options:
    • 4G LTE Cat20/Cat16/Cat9
Color
  • Dark silver
  • Storm Grey
  • Thunder Black (Intel: optional antimicrobial surface treatment)
Size (WxDxH)
  • 321.35 x 212 x 19.3 mm (12.65 x 8.35 x 0.76 in)
  • 317.7 x 226.9 x 17.9 mm (12.51 x 8.93 x 0.70 in)
Weight
  • Starts at 1.36kg (3.01 lbs)
  • Starting at 1.21 kg (2.65 lbs)
Price Starting at $1,419 Starting at $1,299 (AMD) / $1,399 (Intel)

Performance: You get more options with the ThinkPad T14

As you can probably tell by looking at the spec sheet above, the Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 is available in a whole lot of processor configurations, and that helps it stand out in this comparison. For one thing, it’s available in either AMD or Intel versions (though the AMD model isn’t available to buy just yet). Not only that, but the Intel version gives you the option for either U15-series (though these also aren’t available yet) or P-series processors, while the Latitude 5430 only has U15 series models. The Latitude 5430 is also supposed to be available with last-gen Intel processors, but it’s not yet.

Dell Latitude 5430 overhead view with lid open

Intel’s P-series processors have a higher TDP of 28W, as opposed to the 15W of the U15 series, which means that they consume more power, but in return, give you significantly more performance. P-series processors have more cores and more threads, especially with the top-tier Intel Core i7-1280P. If you’re interested in how all of these processors compare, let’s take a look at Geekbench 5 scores to get an idea of what each of them looks like. Lenovo hasn’t revealed the exact AMD processors it will be using in the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3, so they aren’t included here.

Intel Core i5-1235U
(see test)
Intel Core i5-1240P
(see test)
Intel Core i7-1255U
(see test)
Intel Core i7-1280P
(see test)
Geekbench 5 (single/multi-core) 1,586 / 6,432 1,552 / 7,494 1,679 / 6,942 1,710 / 8,430

Because these processors are very recent, there isn’t an established average score yet, so these are individual test results and they may be a little skewed. Still, you can see that the P-series processors achieve noticeably higher scores, which should translate into real-life performance, too, especially if you have more demanding workloads. That means the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 can deliver more performance if you go with a P-series processor, though on the flip side, it will likely have noticeably worse battery life because the processors use more power and the battery options are smaller.

Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 seen from the front at a right-side angle

The ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 also gives you the option for more graphics power, with discrete Nvidia GPUs available in the Intel model, including a GeForce MX550 or RTX 2050, though these options aren’t available yet at writing time. In the AMD model, you don’t get discrete graphics, but the AMD Ryzen 6000 series CPUs do come with the new Radeon 600M integrated GPU, which should be much faster than Intel’s Iris Xe graphics.

The Latitude 5430 has up to 64GB of RAM, and it's fully replaceable.

Dell pulls ahead in the RAM department, though, because the Latitude 5430 can be configured with up to 64GB of RAM, versus 48GB on the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 (or just 32GB on the AMD model). Additionally, the RAM inside the Latitude 5430 is completely replaceable and upgradeable, while the ThinkPad T14 uses soldered memory, with only the Intel model offering one SODIMM slot for expansion. For storage, both models come with up to a 2TB SSD, so there’s not much a difference there.

Display: The ThinkPad T14 has a 16:10 display and higher resolutions

Another area that helps the Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 pull ahead is the display. These are both 14-inch laptops, but the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 comes with a 16:10 aspect ratio, meaning the screen is taller than that of the Latitude 5430. Taller screens first started showing up in premium laptops, but they’re making their way to more mainstream ones, and they’re fantastic news for productivity. A taller display means you can see more content on a webpage or an Excel spreadsheet without scrolling.

Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 front view with a pink gradient

The base model of the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 comes with a Full HD+ (1920 x 1200) panel, which you can configure with touch support or a privacy screen. However, you can also upgrade to a 2.2K (2240 x 1400) panel if you want a bit of extra sharpness, or go all-out with the Ultra HD+ (3840 x 2400) panel, which also includes touch support, 100% coverage of DCI-P3, and DisplayHDR 400 support. These options make this a phenomenal display.

Meanwhile, the Dell Latitude comes with a typical 16:9 aspect ratio for its display, and the base configuration actually comes with a 1366 x 768 resolution, which is very low considering the base price of this laptop. This option doesn’t actually seem to be available for sale despite being on the spec sheet, so maybe it will show up later. Regardless, all the other options are only Full HD (1920 x 1080), with optional touch support and the ability to add a privacy screen. For business users, this should be good enough, but you don’t have the option to get something truly better, and that’s a shame.

Dell Latitude 5430 front view with lid open

In regards to the webcam, the two laptops offer very similar configurations, with a 720p camera in the base model but with the ability to upgrade up to a 1080p camera complete with Windows Hello facial recognition. However, Dell also gives you the option to add Intelligent Privacy features, meaning the laptop’s screen can dim when you look away from it to save battery, or blur the screen if someone is looking over your shoulder.

For sound, neither of these laptops will give you a mind-blowing experience, but they should get the job done. They both have a pair of stereo speakers, and that should be enough to get you through calls or meetings in a pinch.

Design: They’re certainly business laptops

Moving on to the design, neither of these laptops is particularly exciting, which is what you’d expect from business laptops. The Lenovo ThinkPad T14 carries the lineage of the ThinkPad family, with the classic black surfaces (but also available in grey) and red accents. Plus, features like the red TrackPoint and the duplicate mouse buttons above the touchpad are bound to please long-time users of ThinkPads. It’s nothing we haven’t seen before, but maybe you like that.

Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 seen at a left-side angle from the front

The Dell Latitude 5430 is similarly not very exciting, but it doesn’t have the same iconic look as Lenovo’s laptops. It comes in a dark silver color, and there really isn’t anything that adds flair or any kind of distinctive factor.

The ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 is thinner and lighter than the Latitude 5430.

On the more technical side, the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 is also more appealing than the Dell Latitude 5420 in terms of portability. At 17.9mm, it’s noticeably thinner than the 19.3mm of Dell’s laptop, and it’s also significantly lighter, starting at 2.65lbs versus the Latitude’s 3.01lbs.

Ports and connectivity: Similar setups, except for cellular

Finally, we come around to the ports, and the two laptops are very similar. Both come with two Thunderbolt 4 ports, two USB Type-A (3.2 Gen 1) ports, HDMI, RJ45 Ethernet, and a nano SIM card slot if you choose to add cellular connectivity. The Latitude 5430 does have an advantage in the form of a microSD card reader, which can be useful in some cases.

Two Dell Latitude 5430 laptops back to back seen from right-angle perspective

One thing that’s worth noting is that the AMD model of the ThinkPad T14 doesn’t support Thunderbolt, so instead you get two standard USB-C (USB 3.2 Gen 2) ports, which don’t support things like external GPUs or dual 4K 60Hz monitors.

As we mentioned, both laptops offer the option to add cellular connectivity, and they specifically come with LTE support. However, Lenovo’s laptop has an advantage here because it supports LTE with up to Cat20 speeds depending on your configuration. The Latitude 5430 only supports Cat9 LTE, so it’s not quite as fast. Aside from that, they both support Wi-Fi 6E and Bluetooth 5.2.

Dell Latitude 5430 vs Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3: Final thoughts

Both of these laptops have benefits and disadvantages to them, but if we had to make a choice between the two, the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 seems to be the most compelling option in a few ways. For one thing, it offers more powerful processors and graphics (including the choice for an AMD model soon), plus it has a nicer display with more premium options, and it supports faster LTE speeds. Of course, the added performance comes at the cost of battery life, but you can also get it with the less power-hungry 15W processors if you want to favor battery life. We’d also give Lenovo the point in terms of design, since it’s lighter, thinner, and it looks more unique than the Latitude.

On the other hand, the Dell Latitude 5430 does have options for more RAM, plus it’s fully replaceable if you want to upgrade it later. In most other areas, it still offers a good enough experience that matches or comes close to the ThinkPad, plus it has an extra microSD card slot that you might find useful.

For the same price, the ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 comes with significantly more powerful specs.

But then you have to consider the price, and both of these laptops start at almost the same price, even though the base configuration of the Dell Latitude 5430 is far less powerful than that of the ThinkPad T14. In fact, if you compare the options available at writing time, buying the Latitude 5430 with an Intel Core i3-1215U costs more than the ThinkPad T14 with a Core i5-1240P, and Lenovo’s laptop will be much faster. Unless you have a strongly established trust in the Dell brand, it’s hard to recommend the Latitude 5430 in this scenario.

Regardless, you can buy either of these laptops using the links below, though the AMD model of the ThinkPad T14 isn’t yet available to buy.

    The Dell Latitude 5430 is a highly configurable business laptop with 12th-gen Intel processors and a premium design.
    The Lenovo ThinkPad T14 Gen 3 is a business laptop powered by Intel 12th-gen or AMD Ryzen 6000 processors. It has a 16:10 display, lots of ports, and it nails all the basics for businesses.

About author

João Carrasqueira
João Carrasqueira

Editor at XDA Computing. I've been covering the world of technology since 2018, but I've loved the field for a lot longer. And I have a weird affinity for Nintendo videogames, which I'm always happy to talk about.

We are reader supported. External links may earn us a commission.