Disney+ won’t show ads or collect data from children on ad-supported tier

Disney+ won’t show ads or collect data from children on ad-supported tier

It’s only been a few years since the launch of Disney+, yet the service has amassed a whopping 137 million subscribers in that short amount of time. As Disney looks towards the future, it will look to add more subscribers, through a more affordable option. While it is uncertain as to when it will arrive, Disney has expressed interest in offering an ad-supported version of its streaming service.

Thankfully, Disney is quite clear about its strategy for its ad-supported version of Disney+. In a new report from the Wall Street Journal, it states that Disney will keep things to a minimum. That means that it will run about four minutes of ads for every hour of programming. This is quite generous when compared to some other services, which have started upping the quantity of ads in recent years during its programming blocks. Naturally, there is a balance when presenting ads, as longer and more frequent commercial breaks can create a disconnect for users when watching their favorite shows or movies online.

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In another surprising move, Disney will refrain from running ads on shows that cater to young children. It will not run any commercials for programming that is aimed towards preschool children on its ad-supported version when it launches. This will apply to young viewers who use their own account on the streaming service. Furthermore, Rita Ferro, Disney’s president of ad sales and partnerships stated that “We’re never going to collect data on individual kids to target them”.

At this point it is unknown when Disney+ with ads will launch. But, from what we have learned, it should be very competitive and will even provide its younger subscribers with incredible benefits. Currently, Disney+ costs $7.99 a month in the United States. There is no word on pricing of its upcoming ad-supported version of the service.
Source: Wall Street Journal

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