Does the HP EliteBook 840 G9 have good battery life?

Does the HP EliteBook 840 G9 have good battery life?

In any new laptop, you’ll likely want long battery life so you can spend a lot of time away from wall plugs, and more of your day out and about. So, if you want to know if the HP EliteBook 840 G9 business laptop has good battery life, the answer is yes, it does. It also sports two different battery sizes, and both options can chug along nicely for quite a while.

This can be quite important for some business scenarios where workers might always be in the field. In fact, even more important than options like the CPU itself. That’s why we’ll dive a bit deeper with this guide.

HP EliteBook 840 G9 battery

Battery life on any laptop depends on two primary things. As we typically mention when we review the best laptops, the first is the size of the battery, usually rated in watt hour, better known as Wh. The second thing that comes into play is the way you’ll end up using the device. If you use your laptop with the screen at 100% brightness all the time and are doing processor-heavy tasks like running virtual machines, then your battery won’t last too long. Two additional factors include the choice and wattage of the CPU. All that said, here are the specifics on some of that for the HP Elitebook 840 G9.

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Starting first with the Wh on the battery, there are actually two options, according to HP’s specs sheets. The first is a 38Wh HP Long Life 3-cell battery. The second option is an HP Long Life 51 Wh battery. As you’d expect, the second option will result in longer battery life, since it is bigger. That’s the rule of thumb. The higher the Wh, the longer the battery life on the laptop. Typically a laptop maker might have battery claims in hours based on the Wh, but HP does not mention this anywhere on product listings. But, in comparison, another business laptop, the Lenovo ThinkPad Z13 has a similar 51.5 Wh battery and got to around 4 hours in our testing, but that was because it had an OLED display which consumed a lot of power. We have not tested or reviewed it yet, but with other laptops as benchmarks, expect the EliteBook to last around the same 4 to five hour time, if not better, and past 7 hours for a few reasons that we get into next.

Looking at the CPU, we have a few notes on how it impacts battery life. All of the CPU options on the HP Elitebook 840 G9 come from Intel’s P-series lineup. These processors run at 28 watts of power, which is fairly mid-range for final battery life. Other laptops with GPUs feature Intel’s H-series CPUs which run at 45 watts and consume a lot of power. Some lighter and thinner tablets will have the U-series CPUs, which run even lower at 15 or 9 watts for longer battery life. This strikes the perfect balance, with the ThinkPad X1 Carbon 10th Gen being an example, as it got to around 5 hours, which is what we look for in a laptop.

We’ll end by touching on the display. As we already hinted at, high-end and high-resolution displays with OLED technology or touch support will consume a lot of power. In the case of the HP EliteBook 840 G9, this isn’t the case. If you buy a touch screen display, you might lose a bit in terms of battery life, but non-touch options will last a bit longer. The standard IPS panel and the resolution of 1920 x 1200 help out.

So there you have it, folks, that’s all we have to say about the battery life on the HP EliteBook 840 G9. It should be pretty decent and last you within five or 7 hours. But even when it runs dry, you can charge up quickly. The laptop supports Fast Charging with the 65 W USB Type-C adapter. Worse comes to worst, you even can replace the battery with a new one on your own. If all this has you interested, check it out below.

    The HP EliteBook 840 G9 is a great business laptop with high-end specs. Like most business laptops, it's also relatively easy to repair.

About author

Arif Bacchus
Arif Bacchus

I have over six years of experience covering Microsoft, Surface, Windows, macOS, and Chrome OS news and rumors for sites like Digital Trends and OnMSFT. I also write laptop reviews and how-to guides. I am a Microsoft fan and I have a drawer full of PCs and other devices. You can follow and interact with me on Twitter if you want to chat!

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