Flutter 1.22 releases to stable with better Android 11 and iOS 14 support

Flutter 1.22 releases to stable with better Android 11 and iOS 14 support

For those not in-the-know, Flutter is a cross-platform application framework made by Google. Based on Google’s Dart language, it allows developers to share a single codebase among apps for iOS, Android, web, Windows, macOS, and even Linux. Today marks the release of Flutter 1.22, with a whole bunch of new features. In this post, we’re going to be talking about two of them: support for Android’s display cutouts, and support for iOS 14’s App Clips.

With bezelless designs becoming more and more popular, notches and hole-punches are becoming more and more common. While we’re getting close to proper under-display cameras, we’re not there yet. To help developers deal with these different types of display cutouts, Flutter now fully supports Android’s DisplayCutout API. If you use Flutter, you won’t need to worry about something in your app being covered by a notch.

And this support also extends to things like curved or waterfall displays. So if you’ve been having trouble dealing with curved displays, Flutter has your back.

iOS 14 introduced a new feature called App Clips. If you know what Android Instant Apps are, App Clips are essentially the same idea. App Clips allow the user to quickly “install” and open a small part of your app, making it easier to do things like offer online menus or lightweight rental services. Flutter 1.22 includes support for developing App Clips on iOS. That means you can continue to have a unified codebase, while still supporting iOS’ new features.

Of course, Flutter 1.22 introduced quite a bit more than these two features. There’s also better support for localization (including hot-reloading), along with some new UI elements and plugins. If you’re interested in the rest of these changes, check out Google’s blog post.

About author

Zachary Wander
Zachary Wander

I write articles and develop apps for XDA. I'm also the developer of SystemUI Tuner. Yes, I'm bad at writing self-descriptions.