Get a 4K Roku Ultra for $69 today ($31 off), or a Roku Streambar for $99 ($31 off)

Get a 4K Roku Ultra for $69 today ($31 off), or a Roku Streambar for $99 ($31 off)

Roku is one of the oldest names in the streaming box world, and the company is still pumping out new devices and software updates at a steady pace. Roku released a few new products only a few months ago, including a super-cheap Roku Express 4K+ and the Roku Streambar Pro, the latter of which doubles as a soundbar for your TV. Now you can get the Roku Ultra and the regular Roku Streambar for $69 ($31 off) and $99 ($31 off), respectively.

The Roku Ultra is the company’s highest-end streaming box, with a few features you won’t find on most other competing products. Besides all the usual streaming stick features, there are full-size USB and Ethernet ports on the back, so you can easily watch media from your hard drive of totally legally downloaded content or give your Roku a reliable wired internet connection. The voice remote also has an integrated headphone jack for easy private listening.

    Roku Streambar
    This is a Roku streaming stick and TV soundbar in one package. It's on sale for $99, $31 below the usual price.
    Roku Ultra (2020)
    This is one of Roku's best streaming players, with lots of ports and a headphone jack on the remote.

Meanwhile, the Roku Streambar is a soundbar and streaming stick rolled into one package. It has the standard voice remote you’ll find on most Roku products, with integrated TV power and volume controls. The Streambar can either be mounted to your wall, or it can sit on a stand in front of/below your TV.

Both of these were on sale a few months ago at the same prices, so if you missed out on that discount, now’s your chance. I’ve used a few Roku players over the years, and they’ve always been simpler to use and faster than its competitors from Google, Apple, and Amazon. However, they aren’t perfect — Roku has been embroiled in a few battles with app availability, including YouTube TV and HBO. Roku players also aren’t as easily moddable as something running Fire OS or Android/Google TV.

Disclaimer: The author of this article owns stock in Roku. This does not impact the opinions stated here.

About author

Corbin Davenport
Corbin Davenport

Corbin is a tech journalist and software developer based in Raleigh, North Carolina. He's also the host of the Tech Tales podcast, which explores the history of the technology industry. Follow him on Twitter at @corbindavenport.